Read Alberta Books

Browse the latest titles by Alberta book publishers.

The Poor Clare

by Elizabeth Gaskell

Stonehouse Publishing

2018

Classics, Fiction, Horror | 65

CDN: 16.95

Set in Victorian England, Gaskell’s gothic masterpiece weaves the tale of a lonely old woman whose curse upon the murderer of her cherished dog unleashes unintended consequences. The impulse of revenge is turned to contrition after the discovery of an unexpected connection between her and the accursed. Through Ireland to Yorkshire and finally London, a young lawyer discovers a beautiful young woman mysteriously followed by her own demonic doppelganger, and sets out to learn if the curse can be broken.

The High Line Scavenger Hunt

by Lucas Crawford

University of Calgary Press

2018

Poetry | 144

CDN: 18.99

Imagine: a public park that floats above the city, slicing the urban grey with its narrow green body. It winds its way through Manhattan, from the Meatpacking District to Chelsea to the Rail Yards. It is the beneficiary of millionaires, politicians, and citizens, who rescued it from demolition. Every tour book points here. Cities around the world clamor to reclaim their own abandoned train tracks as parks, inspired by this success. This is High Line Park.

Imagine: the Meatpacking District, 1989. Affordable apartments in Chelsea. Queer and racialized youth vogue, using piers as their runways. A transsexual community bands together. The fight for AIDS awareness takes hold. After sunsink, punks and urban adventurers hoist themselves onto the abandoned train tracks, where seeds dropped from loose locomotive doors have bloomed into an elsewhere-landscape, commemorating dead commerce. This was the High Line.

The High Line Scavenger Hunt is a poetic search for the ruins and relics of this fraught space that straddles violent gentrification and erased histories. This is a scavenger hunt, but the list of items is written in invisible ink. Lucas Crawford leans in to the tensions between the revitalized High Line Park and the queer histories of the High Line neighborhood, braiding transgender history, autobiographical reflection, and architectural speculation into a commentary on the histories now lost to gentrification.

American Labour’s Cold War Abroad

From Deep Freeze to Détente, 1945-1970

by Anthony Carew

Athabasca University Press

2018

History, Political Science | 504

CDN: 49.99

During the Cold War, American labour organizations were at the centre of the battle for the hearts and minds of working people. At a time when trade unions were a substantial force in both American and European politics, the fiercely anti-communist American Federation of Labor–Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL–CIO) set a strong example for labour organizations overseas. The AFL–CIO cooperated closely with the US government on foreign policy and enjoyed an intimate, if sometimes strained, relationship with the CIA. The activities of its international staff, and especially the often secretive work of Jay Lovestone and Irving Brown—whose biographies read like characters plucked from a Le Carré novel—exerted a major influence on relationships in Europe and beyond.

Having mastered the enormous volume of correspondence and other records generated by staffers Lovestone and Brown, Carew presents a lively and clear account of what has largely been an unknown dimension of the Cold War. In impressive detail, Carew maps the international programs of the AFL–CIO during the Cold War and its relations with labour organizations abroad, in addition to providing a summary of the labour situation of a dozen or more countries including Finland, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Greece, and India. American Labour’s Cold War Abroad reveals how the Cold War compelled trade unionists to reflect on the role of unions in a free society. Yet there was to be no meeting of minds on this, and at the end of the 1960s the AFL–CIO broke with the mainstream of the international labour movement to pursue its own crusade against communism.

The Mighty Carlins

And Other Plays

by Collin Doyle

NeWest Press

2018

Drama, Theatre | 239

CDN: $19.95

Award-winning playwright Collin Doyle has crafted three gripping plays that display a keen understanding of human relationships, both functional and dysfunctional.

In The Mighty Carlins, an irascible father reunites with his two sons – one a naïve idealist, the other a compulsive manipulative liar – to commemorate the anniversary of their mother’s death. In the dynamic Let the Light of Day Through, a couple in their thirties reimage their relationship and their future, in order to leave behind the memory of their dead teenage son. And in Routes, a lonely teenager rides the Mill Woods bus almost every night to escape the violence of his home life, only to find that violence cannot be avoided with the purchase of a bus ticket.

Redcoats-ish 2

Jeff Martin's War of 1812 Book 2

by Jeff Martin

Renegade Arts Entertainment

2018

Graphic Novel, History | 116

CDN: 14.99

Redcoats-ish 2 collects more comic strips from Jeff Martin’s War of 1812 stories, featuring the misadventures of John and George, two not so fearless men of the Canadian militia. Heeding the call to defend Canada against the invading American army, John and George are now doing their best to be heroes, whilst also working hard to avoid battles, marching, danger or anything else that involves effort. More mad-cap adventures this time as our hapless heroes stumble into Tecumseh, Laura Secord, the burning of the White House and the destruction of Toronto, I mean York. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair guest writes a story about their indigenous counterparts in a twist of perspective too. This a good fun read for anyone looking for War of 1812 adventures that make you chuckle.

Hummingbird

A Novel

by Devin Krukoff

Freehand Books

2018

Fiction, Novel | 232

CDN: 21.95

A compelling, haunting novel about a man experiencing gaps in time, and the pain of living inside an anxious mind.

Felix wakes up one day to find himself with a girlfriend he doesn’t recognize, their life together that is unfamiliar. A novel, with his name on the cover, that he doesn’t remember writing. He’s been losing time since university. Sometimes these gaps are minutes, sometimes months. But now he begins experiencing flashbacks, moments where he gets a glimpse of an unsettling future. He will do anything necessary to keep the people he loves safe . . .

Hummingbird is a haunting, powerful novel, told in unadorned language that expresses with clarity the pain of living inside a disturbed mind. Like Anakana Schofield’s ground-breaking Martin John, Hummingbird is at times uncomfortable, but written with deep compassion and a sense of urgency.

Twin Studies

A Novel

by Keith Maillard

Freehand Books

2018

Fiction, Novel | 576

CDN: 24.95

An engrossing, timely, and contemporary novel about the bonds between twins, about sexuality and gender fluidity, and about the messy complexities of modern family life — the much-anticipated new novel, the first in more than a decade, from acclaimed writer Keith Maillard.

Dr. Erica Bauer — an identical twin — studies twins at the university in Vancouver. Through the course of her research, she meets a set of preteen twins who are evidently fraternal, but who insist emphatically that they are identical. Their mother, Karen Oxley, is a West Van single mum whose life is on the wrong road — and who discovers an urgent need to put it back on the right one. As Erica sets out to help the twins, their lives become increasingly intertwined in unexpected ways.

Twin Studies is a masterful novel that explores the complicated bonds between twins and siblings, friends and lovers; the role of class and money; and the nature of gender and sexuality. Its characters are real, their relationships a rich world that readers will thoroughly lose themselves in. No other contemporary novel so deftly explores the intersection between our inner lives and our public lives — that “we’re not what people see.”

All of Us in Our Own Lives

A Novel

by Manjushree Thapa

Freehand Books

2018

Fiction, Novel | 320

CDN: 21.95

A beautiful story of strangers who shape each other’s lives in fateful ways, All of Us in Our Own Lives delves deeply into the lives of women and men in Nepal and into the world of international aid.

Ava Berriden, a Canadian lawyer, quits her corporate job in Toronto to move to Nepal, from where she was adopted as a baby. There she struggles to adapt to her new career in international aid and forge a connection with the country of her birth.

Ava’s work brings her into contact with Indira Sharma, who has ambitions of becoming the first Nepali woman director of an NGO; Sapana Karki, a bright young teenager living in a small village; and Gyanu, Sapana’s brother, who has returned home from Dubai to settle his sister’s future after their father’s death. Their journeys collide in unexpected ways.

All of Us in Our Own Lives is a stunning, keenly observant novel about human interconnectedness, about privilege, and about the ethics of international aid (the earnestness and idealism and yet its cynical, moneyed nature).

Super Explorers

Planets

by Tamara Hartson

Blue Bike Books

2018

Children's, Education | 64

CDN: 6.99

Super Explorers take you deep into space to see the planets in our Solar System and beyond.

Paper Caskets

by Emilia Danielewska

NeWest Press

2018

Poetry | 101

CDN: 18.95

Emilia Danielewska‘s debut book of prose-poetry reveals the dead. Divided into four parts, Paper Caskets proposes a poetics of the box — as coffin, as prose parameters of the page, as photograph, and as state of mind and body in the face of death. From the act of photographing the dead, to mourning the dead, and to preparing for death that is coming, here is work startling in its clarity, which exposes, as a photograph does, the complicated relationship humans have with mortality.

Paper Caskets looks beyond grief to see the dead as dynamic places where memory and body collide, where flesh rots and fluid seeps and we de/compose prose-poetry.

Left

by Theanna Bischoff

NeWest Press

2018

Fiction, Mystery | 323

CDN: $19.95

Twenty-nine-year-old Natasha Bell went for an evening jog, just like any other night – except now no one knows where she is. Not her sister, Abby – eighteen, eight months pregnant, and without a game plan. Not her childhood sweetheart, now ex-boyfriend, Greg, an introverted academic who could never bring himself to commit. Not her best friend Josie, a newlywed, born-again Christian, with whom Natasha recently had a falling out. And not detective Reuben Blake, who thought this case would be open ’n shut – a quick way to prove himself and move up the ranks. Missing person’s statistics suggest Natasha’s ex is the primary suspect, but what about the possibility of a stranger abduction? Or the possibility that Natasha left voluntarily or took her own life? What about Natasha’s mother, who took off eighteen years before her daughter’s disappearance? As days stretch into months and months stretch into years, the evidence that emerges seems only to complicate the picture more. What secrets might Natasha have been keeping? – and, for that matter, her friends and family.

KidsWorld

Bees and Other Pollinators

by Wendy Einstein & Einstein Sisters

Blue Bike Books

2018

Children's, Education, Educational, Gardening | 64

CDN: 6.99

Bees and other insects and animals help pollinate the planets that give us many of our favorite foods.

Super Explorers

Night Skies of Canada

by Tamara Hartson

Blue Bike Books

2018

Children's, Education, Environment | 64

CDN: 6.99

Super Explorers take you up into the stars to see the wonders of the night sky above.

Amma’s Daughters

A Memoir

by Meenal Shrivastava

Athabasca University Press

2018

Memoir | 312

CDN: 29.95

As a precocious young girl, Surekha knew very little about the details of her mother Amma’s unusual past and that of Babu, her mysterious and sometimes absent father. The tense, uncertain family life created by her parents’ distant and fractious marriage and their separate ambitions informs her every action and emotion. Then one evening, in a moment of uncharacteristic transparency and vulnerability, Amma tells Surekha and her older sister Didi of the family tragedy that changed the course of her life. Finally, the daughters begin to understand the source of their mother’s deep commitment to the Indian nationalist movement and her seemingly unending willingness to sacrifice in the name of that pursuit.

In this re-memory based on the published and unpublished work of Amma and Surekha, Meenal Shrivastava, Surekha’s daughter, uncovers the history of the female foot soldiers of Gandhi’s national movement in the early twentieth century. As Meenal weaves these written accounts together with archival research and family history, she gives voice and honour to the hundreds of thousands of largely forgotten or unacknowledged women who, threatened with imprisonment for treason and sedition, relentlessly and selflessly gave toward the revolution.

Assessment Strategies for Online Learning

Engagement and Authenticity

by Diane Conrad & Jason Openo

Athabasca University Press

2018

Education, Non-Fiction, Scholarly | 206

CDN: 32.99

For many learners, assessment conjures up visions of red pens scrawling percentages in the top right-hand corner of exams and feelings of stress, inadequacy, and failure. Although learners sometimes respond negatively to evaluation, assessments have provided educational institutions with important information about learning outcomes and the quality of education for many decades. But how accurate are these data and have they informed practice or been fully incorporated into the learning cycle? Conrad and Openo argue that the potential inherent in online learning environments to alter and improve assessment and evaluation has yet to be explored by educators and learners.

In their investigation of assessment methods and learning approaches, Conrad and Openo explore assessment that engages and authentically evaluates learning. They insist that online and distance learning environments afford educators new opportunities to embrace only the most effective face-to-face assessment methods and to realize the potential of engaged learning in the digital age. In this volume, practitioners will find not only an indispensable introduction to new forms of assessment but also a number of best practices as described by experienced educators.

The Eavesdroppers

by Rosie Chard

NeWest Press

2018

Drama, Fiction, Mystery, Thriller | 279

CDN: 20.95

When social attitudes researcher Bill Harcourt puts an advertisement in the newspaper for ‘listeners’ to work on an unconventional project, he anticipates that his team of eavesdroppers will discover previously untapped insights into public opinion.

But as five eager listeners begin eavesdropping in the cafes, dentist waiting rooms, public toilets, tube trains and launderettes of London, discreetly noting the details of unguarded conversations, Bill starts to notice subtle changes in their behaviour and realises he has underestimated the compulsive nature of his group. His anxiety is compounded after he receives a series of anonymous letters warning him of the dangers of his experiment.

As the group becomes increasingly intertwined in their subjects’ lives, eavesdropping descends into obsession and Bill has to find a way to rein in his increasingly unruly team before they are beyond help.

Informed by conversations collected over three years, The Eavesdroppers, by award-winning author Rosie Chard, is a dark, yet wryly humorous tale of present-day Londoners, living in a constant state of noise and crowds and eavesdroppers.

Waiting

An Anthology of Essays

by Rona Altrows & Julie Sedivy

The University of Alberta Press

2018

Anthologies: General, Canadian, Canadian Literature, essays, literary collections | 296

CDN: 24.99

Waiting, that most human of experiences, saturates all of our lives. We spend part of each day waiting—for birth, death, appointments, acceptance, forgiveness, redemption. This collection of thirty-two personal essays is as much about hope as it is about waiting. Featuring literary voices from the renowned to the emerging, this anthology of contemporary creative nonfiction will resonate with anyone who has ever had to wait.

The verb esperar means to wait. It also means to hope.—“The Past Was a Small Notebook, Much Scribbled-Upon”, Cora Siré

Contributors: Samantha Albert, Rona Altrows, Sharon Butala, Jane Cawthorne, Weyman Chan, Rebecca Danos, Patti Edgar, John Graham-Pole, Leslie Greentree, Edythe Anstey Hanen, Vivian Hansen, Jane Harris, Richard Harrison, Elizabeth Haynes, Lee Kvern, Anne Lévesque, Margaret Macpherson, Alice Major, Wendy McGrath, Stuart Ian McKay, Lorri Neilsen Glenn, Susan Olding, Roberta Rees, Julie Sedivy, Kathy Seifert, Cora Siré, Steven Ross Smith, Anne Sorbie, Glen Sorestad, Kelly S. Thompson, Robin van Eck, Aritha van Herk

Magnetic North

Sea Voyage to Svalbard

by Jenna Butler

The University of Alberta Press

2018

Canadian, Climate Change, Ecological Science, Ecology, Environment, Essays & Travelogues, Global Warming & Climate Change, Life Sciences, literary collections, Science, the Biosphere, The North, Travel, Women's Studies | 120

CDN: 19.99

“Windburned, eyes closed, this: beneath the keening of bergs, a deeper thresh of glaciers calving, creaking with sun. Sound of earth, her bones, wide russet bowl of hips splaying open. From these sere flanks, her desiccating body, what a sea change is born.”

From the endangered Canadian boreal forest to the environmentally threatened Svalbard archipelago off the coast of Norway, Jenna Butler takes us on a sea voyage that connects continents and traces the impacts of climate change on northern lands. With a conservationist, female gaze, she questions explorer narratives and the mythic draw of the polar North. As a woman who cannot have children, she writes out the internal friction of travelling in Svalbard during the fertile height of the Arctic summer. Blending travelogue and poetic meditation on place, Jenna Butler draws readers to the beauty and power of threatened landscapes, asking why some stories in recorded history are privileged while others speak only from beneath the surface.