Read Alberta Books

Browse recent and past titles by Alberta book publishers.

The Read Alberta Books September 2017 advertising feature.

The Read Alberta Books Spring 2017 advertising feature.

The Sum of Us

Tales of the Bonded and Bound

by Edited by Susan Forest & Lucas K. Law

published by Laksa Media Groups Inc.

2017

Fantasy, Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction | 376 pages

CDN $: 19.95

The world of caregivers and unsung heroes, the province of ghosts . . . Who are THE SUM OF US?

Children giving care. Dogs and cats giving care. Sidekicks, military, monks, ghosts, robots. Even aliens. Care given by lovers, family, professionals. Caregivers who can no longer give. Caregivers who make the decision not to give, and the costs and the consequences that follow. Bound to us by invisible bonds, but with lives, dreams, and passions of their own.

If we believe that we are the protagonists of our lives, then caregivers—our pillars—are ghosts, the bit players, the stock characters, the secondary supports, living lives of quiet trust and toil in the shadows. Summoned to us by the profound magic of great emotional, physical, or psychological need, they play their roles, and when our need diminishes . . .
The caregivers fade.

These are their stories.

Twenty-three science fiction and fantasy authors capture the depth and breadth of caring and of giving. They find insight, joy, devastation, and heroism in grand sweeps and in tiny niches. And, like wasps made of stinging words, there is pain in giving, and in working one’s way through to the light.

Our lives and relationships are complex. But in the end, there is hope, and there is love.

Where the Stars Rise

by Edited by Lucas K. Law and Derwin Mak

2017

Fantasy, Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction | 352 pages

CDN $: 19.95

ALL EMOTIONS ARE UNIVERSAL.

WE LIVE, WE DREAM, WE STRIVE, WE DIE . . .

Follow twenty-three science fiction and fantasy authors on their journeys through Asia and beyond. Stories that explore magic and science. Stories about love, revenge, and choices. Stories that challenge ideas about race, belonging, and politics. Stories about where we come from and where we are going. Each wrestling between ghostly pasts and uncertain future. Each trying to find a voice in history.

Orphans and drug-smuggling in deep space. Mechanical arms in steampunk Vancouver. Djinns and espionage in futuristic Istanbul. Humanoid robot in steamy Kerala. Monsters in the jungles of Cebu. Historic time travel in Gyeongbok Palace. A rocket launch in post-apocalyptic Tokyo. A drunken ghost in Song Dynasty China. A displaced refugee skating on an ice planet. And much more.

Embrace them as you take on their journeys. And don’t look back . . .

Searching for Petronius Totem

by Peter Unwin

published by Freehand Books

2017

Fiction, Satire | 250

An utterly original, satirical novel about a cross-country road trip, the meaning of art, and — as always — flying edible robot chickens.

Following a dramatic break-up with his long-suffering wife, Jack Vesoovian retreats to a Hamilton rooming house, where he impulsively decides to take to the road to track down his life-long colleague, Petronius Totem.

Petronius Totem has disappeared following the unlikely success of his memoir, Ten Thousand Busted Chunks, praised for its searing honesty. But when it is discovered to be a pack of lies, Petronius Totem becomes universally despised.

Meanwhile, Jack faces another grim truth: the world is being taken over by a sinister multi-national Fibre-Optic Catering business that has created a chicken-like food matter than can actually fly. Can he and Petronius Totem escape into a virtual future that is free of Chick Lit and flying fibre-optic chickens? Or will Jack return home to his wife Elaine whom it seems, with good reason, will shoot him on sight?

Searching for Petronius Totem is a love story for the age: a wild, imaginative, and utterly original novel.

The Dragon Run

Two Canadians, Ten Bhutanese, One Stray Dog

by Tony Robinson-Smith

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Biography and Memoir, Travel | 256pp

CDN $: 24.95

Tony Robinson-Smith, his wife Nadya, and ten Bhutanese college students set out to run 578 kilometres (360 miles) across the Kingdom of Bhutan in the Himalayas. Joined by a stray dog, they slogged over five mountain passes, bathed in ice-clogged streams, ate over log fires, and stopped at every store, restaurant, guesthouse, and dzong to raise money for the Tarayana Foundation. The “Tara-thon” was the first endeavour of its kind and gave 350 village children the chance to go to school. En route, the Long Distance Dozen met a Buddhist lama, a royal prince, a Tibetan renegade, and a matriarch who told them the secret to long life. On arrival in Thimphu, they were decorated by Her Majesty the Queen. In this contemplative memoir, Tony describes Bhutan in rich detail at a transformative period in its history and reflects on tradition, belief, modernization, and happiness.

An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land

Unfinished Conversations

by Jennifer S. H. Brown

published by AU Press

2017

Aboriginal Issues, Indigenous Studies | 360 pp

CDN $: 44.95

In 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the Algonquian communities—who hosted and tolerated the fur traders—and later, the missionaries, anthropologists, and others who found their way into Indigenous lives and territories. The eighteen essays gathered in this book explore Brown’s investigations into the surprising range of interactions among Indigenous people and newcomers as they met or observed one another from a distance, and as they competed, compromised, and rejected or adapted to change.

Annie Muktuk

and other stories

by Norma Dunning

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Canadian Literature, Fiction, short stories | 216

CDN $: 19.95

Throughout this audacious collection of short stories, Norma Dunning makes the interplay between contemporary realities and experiences and Inuit cosmology seem deceptively easy. The stories are raucous and funny and resonate with raw honesty. Each eye-opening narrative twist in Annie Muktuk and Other Stories challenges readers’ perceptions of who Inuit people are.

Rodeo Roundup

by Wendy Pirk

published by Dragon Hill Publishing

2017

Children's, Non-Fiction |

CDN $: 6.99

Rodeo is one of the most exciting contests in the world. From bull riding to chuckwagon racing, discover what makes a rodeo so thrilling and what it takes to be a rodeo cowboy: • Steer wrestling, or bulldogging, is a very fast event where cowboys try to wrestle a steer to the ground in less than 7 seconds • A saddle bronc rider must stay on the bucking horse for 8 seconds, holding the reins with one hand and keeping the other hand high in the air • In team roping two cowboys, the header and the heeler, work together to rope a steer’s head and back legs • The rodeo clown has the most dangerous job of all; he tries to distract the bull after a rider has been bucked off • In barrel racing a horse and rider gets a no-time score if they knock over a barrel or make a mistake running the pattern • Mutton busting is an event where kids aged 4 to 7 try to ride a sheep • Chuckwagon racing is one of the most thrilling rodeo events; the chuckwagon and the outriders have to race around barrels in a figure 8 without knocking them over.

Mega Machines: Ships & Boats

by Nicholle Carrire

published by Blue Bike Books

2017

Children's, Non-Fiction |

CDN $: 6.99

Super Explorers want to show you the ships and boats of the world, from the smallest dinghy to the largest cruise ship.

Mega Machines: Planes

by Nicholle Carriere

published by Blue Bike Books

2017

Children's, Non-Fiction |

CDN $: 6.99

The Super Explorers want to show you the planes of the world, from biplanes and passenger jets to stealth aircraft and drones.

Trudeau’s Tango

Alberta Meets Pierre Elliott Trudeau, 1968–1972

by Darryl Raymaker

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Biography and Memoir, Canadian History, Non-Fiction, Political Science, Politics | 244 pages

CDN $: 24.95

Trudeau appeared to enjoy the encounter. He stood his ground while escaping projectiles, including a tomato…

In this insightful and lively history, Liberal insider Darryl Raymaker recalls the attempt to broker “a marriage from hell” between the federal Liberal Party and Alberta’s Social Credit government in the late 1960s. Raymaker uses his deep connections and backroom knowledge to trace the tangled political relationships that developed when charismatic statesman Pierre Trudeau confronted the forces of oil and agriculture in Canada’s west. Part memoir, part chronicle, Trudeau’s Tango provides a window into Canadian history, politics, economics and the zeitgeist of the late 1960s.

Writing Alberta

Building on a Literary Identity

by George Melnyk, Donna Coates (Eds.)

published by University of Calgary Press

2017

Canadian History | 320 pages

CDN $: 34.95

Alberta writing has a long tradition. Beginning with the pictographs of Writing-on-Stone, followed by Euro-Canadian exploration texts, the post-treaty writing of the agrarian colonization period, and into the present era, Alberta writing has come to be seen as a distinct literature. In this volume Melnyk and Coates continue the project of scholarly analysis of Alberta literature that they began with Wild Words: Essays on Alberta Literature (2009). They argue that the essays in their new book confirm that Alberta’s literary identity is historically contingent with a diverse, changing content, that makes its definition a work-in-progress. The essays in this volume provide contemporary perspectives on major figures in poetry and fiction, such as Robert Kroetsch, Sheila Watson, Alice Major, and Fred Stenson.  Other essays bring to light relatively unknown figures such as the Serbian Canadian writer David Albahari and the pioneer clergyman Nestor Dmytrow.

Writing Alberta: Building on a Literary Identity offers a detailed discussion of contemporary Indigenous writers, an overview of Alberta historiography of the past century, and the fascinating autobiographical reflections of the novelist Katherine Govier on her literary career and its Alberta influences. This collection demonstrates that Alberta writers, especially in the contemporary period, are not afraid to uncover, re-think, and re-imagine parts of Alberta history, thereby exposing what had been lain to rest as an unfinished business needing serious re-consideration.

Canadian Fly Fishing

Canadian Fly Fishing

Hot Spots & Essentials

by Duane S. Radford

published by Partners Publishing / Lone Pine Press

2017

Nature Guides, Outdoors | 224 pages

CDN $: 28.95

Canada as a whole is a world-class fly fishing destination, and Duane Radford recounts some amazing trip-of-a-lifetime hot spots. He has fly fished them all and in this book he offers his expertise and experience on everything from basic fly fishing techniques and gear to landing Mr. Big in Canada’s North. This book is packed with information for both the fly fishing novice and aficionado.

When Big Bears Invade

by Nyco Rudolph, Alexander Finbow

published by Renegade Arts Entertainment

2017

Canada, Fiction, humor | 18 pages

CDN $: 19.99

THE MOST CANADIAN BOOK EVER WRITTEN

‘Children, children. Gather round, your grandmother and I will tell you of the time before the benevolent bears showed humanity how to live in harmony with the world. A time when humans ran amok, threatening to destroy the very world we all share so happily now. A time when the Big Bears made sure humanity paid attention to their message. And it happened here, in our very own Canada.’

Manitoba artist Nyco Rudolph and Alberta writer Alexander Finbow join creative forces to reveal the myth behind how the Benevolent Bears came to rule over us all. An illustrated children’s book for adults featuring beautiful Godzilla and King Kong inspired paintings of Giant Bears attacking major Canadian cities and landmarks. Includes Grizzly Bear Colossuses attacking the CN Tower, Spirit Bears surfing the Tsunami into Vancouver, a huge Bearnado ripping into Winnipeg, giant bear cubs playing jump rope with the Mountain Gateway pipeline, Polar Bear Behemoths dropping a glacier on to the oil sands, and the Giant Bears delivering a very Canadian wall to keep the Americans out. At least that’s what Granny says really happened.

Give Your Other Vote to the Sister

A Woman's Journey into the Great War

by Debbie Marshall

published by University of Calgary Press

2017

Biography, History, Non-Fiction | 338 pages

CDN $: $29.95 CAD / $29.95 USD

Give Your Other Vote to the Sister tells the story of Roberta MacAdams, the first woman elected to the Alberta legislature. In fact, she was one of the first two women elected to a legislature anywhere in the British Empire.

Give Your Other Vote to the Sister describes MacAdams’ journey overseas, her work at a large military hospital in London, and the personal sacrifices she endured during the war. It also chronicles Debbie Marshall’s own journey to reclaim MacAdams’ life, one that took her across Canada and to the places where MacAdams lived and worked in England and France. It was a search that would change her own perceptions about how and why so may women willingly participated in the world’s first “great war.”

 

Calgary: City of Animals

by Jim Ellis

published by University of Calgary Press

2017

Academic, Nature, Non-Fiction | 144

CDN $: 29.95

How have our interactions with animals shaped Calgary?

What can we do to ensure that humans and animals in the city continue to co-exist, and even flourish together?

This wide-ranging book explores the ways that animals inhabit our city, our lives and our imaginations.

Essays from animal historians, wildlife specialists, artists and writers address key issues such as human-wildlife interactions, livestock in the city, and animal performers at the Calgary Stampede.

Contributions from some of Calgary’s iconic arts institutions, including One Yellow Rabbit Performance Theatre, Decidedly Jazz Danceworks, and the Glenbow Museum, demonstrate how animals continue to be a source of inspiration and exploration for fashion, art, dance, and theatre.

The full-colour volume is beautifully illustrated throughout with archival images, wildlife photography, documentary and production stills, and original artwork.

Alberta’s Lower Athabasca Basin

Archaeology and Palaeoenvironments

by edited by Brian M. Ronaghan

published by Athabasca University Press

2017

Academic, Non-Fiction, Textbook | 559 pages

CDN $: 39.95

Over the past two decades, the oil sands region of northeastern Alberta has been the site of unprecedented levels of development. Alberta’s Lower Athabasca Basin tells a fascinating story of how a catastrophic ice age flood left behind a unique landscape in the Lower Athabasca Basin, one that made deposits of bitumen available for surface mining. Less well known is the discovery that this flood also produced an environment that supported perhaps the most intensive use of boreal forest resources by prehistoric Native people yet recognized in Canada. Studies undertaken to meet the conservation requirements of the Alberta Historical Resources Act have yielded a rich and varied record of prehistoric habitation and activity in the oil sands area. Evidence from between 9,500 and 5,000 years ago—the result of several major excavations—has confirmed extensive human use of the region’s resources, while important contextual information provided by key ecological and palaeoenvironmental studies has deepened our understanding of how the region’s early inhabitants interacted with the landscape.

Touching on various elements of this rich environmental and archaeological record, the contributors to this volume use the evidence gained through research and compliance studies to offer new insights into human and natural history. They also examine the challenges of managing this irreplaceable heritage resource in the face of ongoing development.

Finding Directions West

Readings that Locate and Dislocate Western Canada's Past

by ed. George Colpitts and Heather Devine

published by University of Calgary

2017

Canadian History, History | 266

CDN $: $34.95

In the past, Western Canada was a place of new directions in human thought and action, migrations of the mind and body, and personal journeys. This book anthology brings together studies exploring the way the west served as a place of constant movement between places of spiritual, subsistence and aesthetic importance. The region, it would seem, gained its very life in the movement of its people. Finding Directions West: Readings that Locate and Dislocate Western Canada’s Past, showcases new Western Canadian research on the places found and inhabited by indigenous people and newcomers, as well as their strategies to situate themselves, move on to new homes or change their environments to recreate the West in profoundly different ways. These studies range from the way indigenous people found representation in museum displays, to the archival home newcomers found for themselves: how, for instance, the LGBT community found a place, or not, in the historical record itself. Other studies examine the means by which Métis communities, finding the west transforming around them, turned to grassroots narratives and historical preservation in order to produce what is now appreciated as vernacular histories of inestimable value. In another study, the issues confronted by the Stoney Nakoda who found their home territory rapidly changing in the treaty and reserve era is examined: how Stoney connections to Indian agents and missionaries allowed them to pursue long-distance subsistence strategies into the pioneer era.

Animal Metropolis

Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada

by ed. by Joanna Dean, Darcy Ingram and Christabelle Sethna

published by University of Calgary Press

2017

Canadian History, Environment | 335

CDN $: 34.95

Animal Metropolis brings a Canadian perspective to the growing field of animal history, ranging across species and cities, from the beavers who engineered Stanley Park to the carthorses who shaped the city of Montreal. Some essays consider animals as spectacle: orca captivity in Vancouver, polar bear tourism in Churchill, Manitoba, fish on display in the Dominion Fisheries Museum, and the racialized memory of Jumbo the elephant in St. Thomas, Ontario. Others examine the bodily intimacies of shared urban spaces: the regulation of rabid dogs in Banff, the maternal politics of pure milk in Hamilton and the circulation of tetanus bacilli from horse to human in Toronto. Another considers the marginalization of women in Canada’s animal welfare movement. The authors collectively push forward from a historiography that features nonhuman animals as objects within human-centered inquiries to a historiography that considers the eclectic contacts, exchanges, and cohabitation of human and nonhuman animals

Malala

Women Who Inspire Series

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2017

Biography, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Malala was lucky. Her parents knew the value of an education for both boys and girls, so Malala was sent to school and excelled. Today, Malala is known world-wide as the young Pakistani girl who bravely spoke up in support of female education. In spite of a near-fatal attack by a Taliban supporter who shot her in the head, Malala continues to be a determined voice for young girls striving to get an education. In 2014, at the age of 17, Malala was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the youngest person ever to achieve the prestigious award

Helen Keller

Women Who Inspire Series

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2017

Biography, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Helen Keller learned to speak, read, and write in spite of becoming blind and deaf at the age of two due to an illness. As a child, Helen was frustrated and unmanageable but her mother never gave up on her. Helen’s life changed when a teacher, Annie Sullivan, came into her life. Annie won Helen’s trust and was able to teach Helen to speak, read, and write. Helen had Annie at her side when she became the first deaf-blind person to get a college degree. She used her fame to raise money for deaf and blind people and to fight for women’s rights. Helen Keller lived to the age of 80 and died in peace in 1968.

Wangari Maathai

Women Who Inspire Series

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2017

Biography, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

In 1977, Wangari Maathai formed the Green Belt Movement, an organization that paid poor women to plant trees. The movement started in Kenya and soon spread throughout Africa. The simple act of planting a tree not only helped improve the local environment of the people but also empowered women in Africa. They became the keepers of the environment and found a way to stand up for their rights and the rights of their communities. Wangari showed the world how environment, poverty, and peace go hand in hand. In 2004, Wangari became the first black woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Clara Hughes

Women Who Inspire Series

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2017

Biography, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Clara Hughes was on a risky path as a teenager. Watching the Olympic Games in 1988 changed her life. She was inspired to go for gold. Although she began training as a speed skater, her coach encouraged her to pursue cycling. Clara excelled at cycling and won Olympic medals. However, she went back to her original dream of speed skating and won Olympic medals in that sport as well. She was the first athlete to compete in and win medals in both the Summer and Winter Olympics. Clara decided to give back by working with youth at risk and providing opportunities for children to play sports. She currently dedicates her time to raising awareness about mental health issues such as depression, which she herself has struggled with in the past.

English-Arabic Bilingual Photostories (Set of 9)

published by Grassroots Press

2017

ESL | 52-60

CDN $: 115.95 (For entire series, 12.95 each)

Dual language books are wonderful tools to help create a literacy bridge between languages. These bilingual photostories are set up so that students can read the stories in both the target language and their first language, making it possible to compare and contrast the texts and develop metalinguistic ability. The photographs on each page reflect the text, making the words easy to decode. The diverse topics will appeal to a broad range of students. The set includes the following titles: Volunteer Series: Thrift Store, Gardening; Health Series: Stress, A Good Night’s Sleep, Fad Diets; Be-the-Judge Series: Tony’s Deal, The Change; How-to Series: How to Check an Apartment, How to Build Community

English-Spanish Series (Set of 12)

published by Grassroots Press

2017

ESL | 52-60

CDN $: 154.95

Dual language books are wonderful tools to help create a literacy bridge between languages. These bilingual photostories are set up so that students can read the stories in both the target language and their first language, making it possible to compare and contrast the texts and develop metalinguistic ability. The photographs on each page reflect the text, making the words easy to decode. The diverse topics will appeal to a broad range of students. The set includes the following titles: Volunteer stories: Thrift Store, Daycare Centre, Gardening; Health issues: Stress, A Good Night’s Sleep, Fad Diets; Be-the-Judge: Tony’s Deal, Mandy’s Garage Sale, The Change; How-to: How to Check an Apartment, How to Be Good to Yourself, How to Build Community

Throwing the Diamond Hitch

by Emily Ursula

published by U of C Press

2017

Biography & Memoir, History | 105

CDN $: 18.95

In 1951 two intrepid women, Phyllis and her best friend, Anne, set off on a journey from Victoria, British Columbia, to Red Deer, Alberta, and back again. Travelling first by 1927 MG Roadster to Alberta, and then on horseback on the way home, the journey took months and would test the women’s wits and resourcefulness at every turn. Phyl and Anne documented their adventures and the stories of the people they met along the way in a journal, which was passed down to author Emily Ursuliak, Phyl’s granddaughter. Throwing the Diamond Hitch—an inventive, poetic retelling of the Phyl and Anne’s journey—crackles like the starter of an old roadster, and kicks like a stubborn pack pony. Ursuliak employs a variety of poetic styles and approaches to capture the personality of the two women and the motley of characters they encountered on their trip. Ride along with Phyl and Anne, and discover how to throw the elusive diamond hitch.

The Book of Sensations

by Sheri-D Wilson

published by U of C Press

2017

Poetry | 120

CDN $: 18.95

The Book of Sensations by Sheri-D Wilson embodies an intricate ecosystem of language and feeling. These poems reach their roots down into the depths of what it means to be—to connect to one another, and to connect to the earth. With fine-tuned vocabulary, far-reaching observation, and the dream-vision of the surrealist eye, Sheri-D delves into the personal and the universal, the everyday and the mythical. This book is full of poignant sensations and astonishing realizations. This is a book of life and experience. Put it in your pocket and immerse yourself in a world of sensations.

Listen. If

by Douglas Barbour

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Canadian Literature, Poetry | 152 Pages

CDN $: 19.95

first snow falling slow

hangs in the air

a curtain drifting there

thickening sight

—“Winter”

In this new collection, Douglas Barbour experiments with what he calls “rhythmically intense open form.” Listen. If presents technically innovative poetry that invites the reader to join in some serious play. Barbour’s vivid, ekphrastic poems engage an ongoing conversation among artworks—not only classic paintings but also popular music—while his lyric poems astutely, accessibly evoke places, moments, and feelings. This is poetry that takes up language both as the already-said and as a playground for brilliant technique. Leaping from love to landscapes, politics to jazz, Keats to Milne to Monk, these poems yearn to be spoken aloud for the pure joy of sound.

Only Leave a Trace

by Roger Epp

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Education, Leadership, Self-Help | 96

CDN $: 19.95

“Make yourself big when you enter a room, when you meet a bear in the woods. Make yourself big. Meet the eyes.”

Roger Epp’s poetic meditations about the best, the hardest, the loneliest times of leading a small university campus through significant change are depicted in a series of elegant yet understated prose pieces, alongside images by his life partner, Rhonda Harder Epp. Taking a candid look at the many challenges such a position brings, Roger Epp humanizes, scrutinizes, and upholds the integrity of academic administrative work. Only Leave a Trace will resonate with those who work in universities, hold leadership roles in them, or care about the connections between higher education, students, and place.

The Burgess Shale

The Canadian Writing Landscape of the 1960s – CLC Kreisel Lecture Series

by Margaret Atwood

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Canadian Literature, essays, Language Arts, Literary Criticism | 56

CDN $: 10.95

“The outburst of cultural energy that took place in the 1960s was in part a product of the two decades that came before. It’s always difficult for young people to see their own time in perspective: when you’re in your teens, a decade earlier feels like ancient history and the present moment seems normal: what exists now is surely what has always existed.”

Margaret Atwood compares the Canadian literary landscape of the 1960s to the Burgess Shale, a geological formation that contains the fossils of many strange prehistoric life forms. The Burgess Shale is not entirely about writing itself, however: Atwood also provides some insight into the meagre writing infrastructure of that time, taking a lighthearted look at the early days of the institutions we take for granted today—from writers’ organizations, prizes, and grant programs to book tours and festivals.

Flora Annie Steel

A Critical Study of an Unconventional Memsahib

by Edited by Susmita Roye

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

History, Literary Criticism | 304 Pages

CDN $: 49.95

Flora Annie Steel (1847–1929) was a contemporary of Rudyard Kipling and rivaled his popularity as a writer during her lifetime, but her legacy faded due to gender-biased politics. She spent 22 years in India, mainly in the Punjab. This collection is the first to focus entirely on this “unconventional memsahib” and her contribution to turn-of-the-century Anglo-Indian literature. The eight essays draw attention to Steel’s multifaceted work—ranging from fiction to journalism to letter writing, from housekeeping manuals to philanthropic activities. These essays, by recognized experts on her life and work, will appeal to interdisciplinary scholars and readers in the fields of British India and Women’s Studies.

Contributors: Amrita Banerjee, Helen Pike Bauer, Ralph Crane, Gráinne Goodwin, Alan Johnson, Anna Johnston, Danielle Nielsen, LeeAnne M. Richardson, Susmita Roye

Beyond “Understanding Canada”

Transnational Perspectives on Canadian Literature

by Edited by Melissa Tanti, Jeremy Haynes, Daniel Coleman and Lorraine York

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Literary Criticism, Political Science, Public Policy | 368 Pages

CDN $: 49.95

The dismantling of “Understanding Canada”—an international program eliminated by Canada’s Conservative government in 2012—posed a tremendous potential setback for Canadianists. Yet Canadian writers continue to be celebrated globally by popular and academic audiences alike. Twenty scholars speak to the government’s diplomatic and economic about-face and its implications for representations of Canadian writing within and outside Canada’s borders. The contributors to this volume remind us of the obstacles facing transnational intellectual exchange, but also salute scholars’ persistence despite these obstacles. Beyond “Understanding Canada” is a timely, trenchant volume for students and scholars of Canadian literature and anyone seeking to understand how Canadian literature circulates in a transnational world.

Contributors:

Michael A. Bucknor, Daniel Coleman, Anne Collett, Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Ana María Fraile-Marcos, Jeremy Haynes, Cristina Ivanovici, Milena Kaličanin, Smaro Kamboureli, Katalin Kürtösi, Vesna Lopičić, Belén Martín-Lucas, Claire Omhovère, Lucia Otrísalová, Don Sparling, Melissa Tanti, Christl Verduyn, Elizabeth Yeoman, Lorraine York

The Wolves at My Shadow

The Story of Ingelore Rothschild

by Ingelore Rothschild, edited by Darilyn Stahl Listort and Dennis Listort

published by Athabasca University Press

2017

Biography, Memoir | 306 pages

CDN $: 24.95

Ingelore Rothschild was twelve years old when she was whisked out of her home in 1936. It was her first step on a cross-continent journey to Japan, where she and her parents sought refuge from rising anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. A decade later, as she sails away from what has become her home in Kobe, Japan, Ingelore records her memories of life in Berlin, the long train journey through Russia, and her time in Japan during World War II.

Each leg of the journey presents its own nightmare: passports are stolen, identities are uncovered, a mudslide tears through the Rothschild’s home, and the atomic bombs are dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Ingelore’s bright, observant nature and remarkable capacity for befriending those along her way fills her narrative with unique details about the people she meets and the places she travels to.

The story of Ingelore and her prominent German Jewish family’s escape is an invaluable account that contributes to Holocaust witness and memoir literature. Although she was forever marked by her traumatic past, Ingelore’s survival story is a painful reminder that only European Jews with significant financial means were able to carefully orchestrate an escape from Nazi Germany.

Ontario Nature Guide

by Krista Kagame

published by Lone Pine

2017

Nature Guides | 224

CDN $: 19.95

The Ontario Nature Guide lets you discover the wondrous diversity of nature that lies right outside your front door. Covering every inch of Ontario’s incredibly varied landscape, this book teaches you to identify 382 species of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, invertebrates, trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses and ferns:

* Colour illustrations of each species
* Native uses of plants
* Animal behaviour
* Ecology and range
* Similar species cross-referenced
* Colour maps showing ecoregions, parks and nature areas across Ontario.

Birds of Ontario

by Andy Bezener

published by Lone Pine

2017

Nature Guides | 375

CDN $: 26.95

This illustrated field guide helps readers identify, understand and appreciate the birds of Ontario. It contains full-colour illustrations and detailed descriptions of 318 species, with each account including information on:

*Size * Status * Habitat * Nesting * Feeding * Voice * Similar species cross-referenced * Best sites for viewing * Range maps showing seasonal occurrences of the bird and migration routes.

Colour-coded header bars and a quick reference guide make finding information fast and easy. Also includes a glossary of terms and a birder’s checklist. Technical review by Ross James, former Curator of Ornithology at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Interrogating Motherhood

by Lynda Ross

published by AU Press

2017

Gender Studies, Sociology | 163

CDN $: 27.95

It has been four decades since the publication of Adrienne Rich’s Of Woman Born but her analysis of maternity and the archetypal Mother remains a powerful critique, as relevant today as it was at the time of writing. It was Rich who first defined the term “motherhood” as referent to a patriarchal institution that was male-defined, male controlled, and oppressive to women. To empower women, Rich proposed the use of the word “mothering”: a word intended to be female-defined. It is between these two ideas—that of a patriarchal history and a feminist future—that the introductory text, Interrogating Motherhood, begins. Ross explores the topic of mothering from the perspective of Western society and encourages students and readers to identify and critique the historical, social, and political contexts in which mothers are understood. By examining popular culture, employment, public policy, poverty, “other” mothers, and mental health, Interrogating Motherhood describes the fluid and shifting nature of the practice of mothering and the complex realities that define contemporary women’s lives.

Nuala

A Fable

by Kimmy Beach

published by U of A Press

2017

Fable, Fiction | 150

CDN $: 19.95

“Shh, my Nuala. I am with you. Today I shall teach you the newness of you.”

As the Engine breathes life into Nuala, her gaze falls on Teacher-Servant, the chosen one. He alone will be able to hear her thoughts and interpret her emotions. But soon Teacher-Servant starts to worry that Nuala will be able to give away her thoughts freely. Set in an atypical dystopian world, Nuala is startlingly original and inventive, echoing the work of Margaret Atwood, José Saramago, and Kazuo Ishiguro. Beach’s dark, fearless imagination has created a time and space that are at once remote and strange, but absorbing and deeply credible. Nuala leaves the reader with much to consider about the nature of love, possessiveness, jealousy, envy, and autonomy.

Ice Blink

Navigating Northern Environmental History

by ed. Stephen Bocking and Brad Martin

published by U of C Press

2017

Canadian History, Environment | 532

CDN $: 41.95

Northern Canada’s distinctive landscapes, its complex social relations and the contested place of the North in contemporary political, military, scientific and economic affairs have fueled recent scholarly discussion. At the same time, both the media and the wider public have shown increasing interest in the region. This timely volume extends our understanding of the environmental history of northern Canada – clarifying both its practice and promise, and providing critical perspectives on current public debates.

Ice Blink provides opportunities to consider critical issues in other disciplines and geographic contexts. Contributors also examine whether distinctive approaches to environmental history are required when studying the Canadian North, and consider a range of broader questions. What, if anything, sets the study of environmental history in particular regions apart from its study elsewhere? Do environmental historians require regionally-specific research practices? How can the study of environmental history take into consideration the relations between Indigenous peoples, the environment, and the state? How can the history of regions be placed most effectively within transnational and circumpolar contexts? How relevant are historical approaches to contemporary environmental issues?

Little Wildheart

by Micheline Maylor

published by U of A Press

2017

Canadian Literature, Poetry | 71

CDN $: 19.95

By turns quirky, startling, earthy, and hope-filled, Micheline Maylor’s poems slip effortlessly through topics ranging from what we give up as we age to regrets for love that has passed, the interplay between the animal world and human thought, and the myths we append to ourselves and others. An expansive, conversational voice underscores the poet’s technical mastery as her subjects turn from love to hope to fearlessness. Maylor asks readers to perceive how we inhabit our selves, how words construct us. Little Wildheart is rich with challenge and surprise.

The Documentary Art of Filmmaker Michael Rubbo

by D. B. Jones

published by U of C Press

2017

art, Memoir | 245

CDN $: 34.95

Michael Rubbo’s groundbreaking work has had a deep and enduring impact on documentary filmmaking worldwide, though his name has remained relatively unknown. In The Documentary Art of Michael Rubbo, author D.B. Jones traces Rubbo’s filmmaking from his days as a film student at Stanford, through his twenty years at the National Film Board of Canada, where Rubbo developed his distinct documentary style. Jones then describes Rubbo’s post-NFB venture into feature film directing, followed by Rubbo’s return to his native Australia, first as an executive with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and later as a director of feature-length documentaries and maker of short, personal films for YouTube.

Exploring locales from Montreal to Vietnam, topics as diverse as plastic surgery and French Marxism, and from interviewing Margaret Atwood to documenting a failed attempt to interview Fidel Castro, Rubbo’s wide-ranging work establishes his innovative, personal, lyric, and spontaneous documentary style. In The Documentary Art of Michael Rubbo D.B. Jones reveals not only the depth of meaning in Rubbo’s films, but also the depth of their influence on filmmaking itself.

Believing is not the same as Being Saved

by Lisa Martin

published by U of A Press

2017

Poetry | 85

CDN $: 19.95

Lisa Martin’s new poetry collection seeks the kind of lyric truth that lives in paradox, in the dwelling together of seeming opposites such as life and death, love and loss, faith and doubt, joy and sorrow. Here readers will find a range of moods, tones, and subjects, as well as both traditional and contemporary forms—from sonnets to prose poems. This is a collection imbued with the light of an enduring, if troubled, faith. With its focus on spirit, ethics, and how to live well, Believing is not the same as Being Saved offers a tender meditation on the moments that make a life.

Vascular Plants of Alberta

Part 1: Ferns, Fern Allies, Gymnosperms, and Monocots

by John Packer and Joyce Gould

published by U of C Press

2017

Biology, Non-Fiction | 281

CDN $: 34.95

Vascular Plants of Alberta is a user-friendly, portable key to the ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, and monocots of Alberta. This key to the species of Alberta will delight all those interested in botany, with its intuitive and exhaustive presentation of the plants, including new names and taxonomical understandings that have emerged in recent years. Designed to be carried into the field for handy reference and use, Vascular Plants of Alberta presents:

A list of all species, native and introduced, known to occur in Alberta, arranged alphabetically

Information on scientific names of taxa and their synonyms

Keys for identifying taxa, including infra specific

Descriptions of the major taxonomic categories

Discussion about taxonomic problems and relationships of the taxa

Distribution and habitat information for native species

Descriptions for new taxa

Understanding Atrocities

Remembering, Representing, and Teaching Genocide

by ed. Scott Murray

published by U of C Press

2017

History, Non-Fiction | 281

CDN $: 34.95

Understanding Atrocities is a wide-ranging collection of essays bridging scholarly and community-based efforts to understand and respond to the global, transhistorical problem of genocide. The essays in this volume investigate how evolving, contemporary views on mass atrocity frame and complicate the possibilities for the understanding and prevention of genocide. The contributors ask, among other things, what are the limits of the law, of history, of literature, and of education in understanding and representing genocidal violence? What are the challenges we face in teaching and learning about extreme events such as these, and how does the language we use contribute to or impair what can be taught and learned about genocide? Who gets to decide if it’s genocide and who its victims are? And how does the demonization of perpetrators of atrocity prevent us from confronting the complicity of others, or of ourselves? Through a multi-focused and multidisciplinary investigation of these questions, Understanding Atrocities demonstrates the vibrancy and breadth of the contemporary state of genocide studies.

With contributions by: Amarnath Amarasingam, Andrew R. Basso, Kristin Burnett, Lori Chambers, Laura Beth Cohen, Travis Hay, Steven Leonard Jacobs, Lorraine Markotic, Sarah Minslow, Donia Mounsef, Adam Muller, Scott W. Murray, Christopher Powell, and Raffi Sarkissian

Finding Directions West

Readings that Locate and Dislocate Western Canada's Past

by ed. George Colpitts, ed. Heather Devine (Editor)

published by University of Calgary Press

2017

Canada, History, Non-Fiction | 330 pages

CDN $: $34.95 CAD / $34.95 USD

In the past, Western Canada was a place of new directions in human thought and action, migrations of the mind and body, and personal journeys. This book anthology brings together studies exploring the way the west served as a place of constant movement between places of spiritual, subsistence and aesthetic importance. The region, it would seem, gained its very life in the movement of its people. Finding Directions West: Readings that Locate and Dislocate Western Canada’s Past, showcases new Western Canadian research on the places found and inhabited by indigenous people and newcomers, as well as their strategies to situate themselves, move on to new homes or change their environments to recreate the West in profoundly different ways. These studies range from the way indigenous people found representation in museum displays, to the archival home newcomers found for themselves: how, for instance, the LGBT community found a place, or not, in the historical record itself. Other studies examine the means by which Métis communities, finding the west transforming around them, turned to grassroots narratives and historical preservation in order to produce what is now appreciated as vernacular histories of inestimable value. In another study, the issues confronted by the Stoney Nakoda who found their home territory rapidly changing in the treaty and reserve era is examined: how Stoney connections to Indian agents and missionaries allowed them to pursue long-distance subsistence strategies into the pioneer era.

The anthology includes an analysis of a lengthy travel diary of an English visitor to Depression-era Alberta, revealing how she perceived the region in a short government-sponsored inquiry. Other studies examine the ways women, themselves newcomers in pioneering society, evaluated new immigrants to the region and sought to extend, or not, the vote to them; and the ways early suffrage activists in Alberta and England by World War I developed key ideas when they cooperated in publicity work in Western Canada. Finding Directions West also includes a study on ranchers and how they initially sought to circumscribe their practices around large landholdings in periods of drought, to the architectural designs imported to places such as the Banff Centre that defied the natural geography of the Rocky Mountains. Too often, Western Canadian history is understood as a fixed, precisely mapped and authoritatively documented place. This anthology prompts readers to think differently about a region where ideas, people and communities were in a constant but energetic flux, and how newcomers converged into sometimes impermanent homes or moved on to new experiences to leave a significant legacy for the present-day.

The Fur Trade in the West

by Phyllis Arnold

published by The Edmonton and District Historical Society

2017

Historical, Local History | 80

CDN $: 19.95

The Edmonton and District Historical Society has published a student resource, The Fur Trade in the West, to commemorate Canada’s 150th Birthday in 2017.

Written by Phyllis Arnold, the book is 80 pages and contains hundreds of photos, maps and other visuals, with text geared to the upper elementary reading level. It focuses on what people were doing in the Edmonton area when Canada became a country in 1867.

Spark of Light

Short Stories by Women Writers of Odisha

by ed. by Valerie Henitiuk and Supriya Kar

published by AU Press

2017

literature | 240

CDN $: 27.95

Spark of Light is a diverse collection of short stories by women writers from the Indian province of Odisha. Originally written in Odia and dating from the late nineteenth century to the present, these stories offer a multiplicity of voices—some sentimental and melodramatic, others rebellious and bold—and capture the predicament of characters who often live on the margins of society. From a spectrum of viewpoints, writing styles, and motifs, the stories included here provide examples of the great richness of Odishan literary culture.

In the often shadowy and grim world depicted in this collection, themes of class, poverty, violence, and family are developed. Together they form a critique of social mores and illuminate the difficult lives of the subaltern in Odisha society. The work of these authors contributes to an ongoing dialogue concerning the challenges, hardships, joys, and successes experienced by women around the world. In these provocative explorations of the short-story form, we discover the voices of these rarely heard women.

Evelina

A Novel

by Frances Burney

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2017

| 504

CDN $: 19.95

The first novel by the prolific 18th century writer, Evelina is a lighthearted epistolary novel chronicling a young lady’s rise in Regency England society. Evelina, having been raised in the country and sheltered from the evils of London, is suddenly thrust into the height of upper class society and introduced to her ridiculous and self-important grandmother. What follows is an entertaining tale of love, friendship, and growing up, told with the wit and charm that inspired, and was admired by, Jane Austen.

Daughter of famed Music Historian, Charles Burney, Frances Burney became a literary sensation soon after she released her first book, Evelina, in 1778. Although Evelina was first published anonymously, Miss Burney’s identity as the author was soon discovered, coming as a surprise even to her father. She became second keeper of the robes for Queen Charlotte starting in 1786, and then in 1793, met and married the French émigré, General D’Arblay. Frances chronicled her long life in her Journals and Letters, which have been preserved and reprinted various times (recently, by McGill-Queen’s University Press). Frances Burney’s novels were known and admired by Jane Austen, Napoleon and Edmund Burke alike. Frances Burney was born in Norfolk, England, in 1752 and died in London in 1840.

Something Unremembered

A Novel

by Della Dennis

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2017

literature | 350

CDN $: 19.95

One would hardly think an outlying college town on the prairies would be the place a woman from the 15th century would choose to reveal her story, but when Janine begins to discover the story of Madeleine of Beauvais interpolated in the pages of her beloved books about the history of art and culture, an enigmatic presence begins to form. Mystified by references to Madeleine which seem to appear in her books only to disappear again, and unhappy with her own restless ever-aftering, Janine becomes preoccupied with uncovering the secrets of Madeleine’s life.

Encountering Riel

A Novel

by David Orr

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2017

literature | 307

CDN $: 19.95

Willie Lorimer is a young poetry student who forgot to resign his commission in the Canadian militia. When he is called up to join the fight against the Métis rebel leader, Louis Riel, Willie is scared, but bolstered by his own naïveté. The journey to the heart of the rebellion is long and full of anguish. When the militia reach the West, things go tragically wrong, and their once-heroic cause is marred by the cynical realities of politics, and the harsh realities of war.

My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell

by Arthur Bear Chief

published by AU Press

2017

Biography and Memoir, Indigenous | 172

CDN $: 19.95

My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell is a simple and outspoken account of the sexual and psychological abuse that Arthur Bear Chief suffered during his time at Old Sun Residential school in Gleichen on the Siksika Nation. In a series of chronological vignettes, Bear Chief depicts the punishment, cruelty, abuse, and injustice that he endured at Old Sun and then later relived in the traumatic process of retelling his story at an examination for discovery in connection with a lawsuit brought against the federal government.

He returned to Gleichen late in life—to the home left to him by his mother—and it was there that he began to reconnect with Blackfoot language and culture and to write his story. Although the terrific adversity Bear Chief faced in his childhood made an indelible mark on his life, his unyielding spirit is evident throughout his story.

Tar Wars

Oil, Environment, and Alberta's Image

by Geo Takach

published by University of Alberta Press

2017

Academic, Business & Economics, Environment, Environmental Conservation & Protection, Non-Fiction, Petroculture, Public Relations | 241 pages

CDN $: 27.99

Tar Wars offers a critical inside look at how leading image-makers negotiate escalating tensions between continuous economic growth mandated by a globalized economic system and its unsustainable environmental costs. As place branding assumes paramount importance in an increasingly global, visual, and ecologically conscious society, an international battle unfolds over Alberta’s bituminous sands. This battle pits independent documentary filmmakers against professional communicators employed by government and the oil industry. Tar Wars engages scholars and students in communications, film, environmental studies, social psychology, PR, media and cultural studies, and petrocultures. This book also speaks to decision makers, activists, and citizens exploring intersections of energy, environment, culture, politics, economy, media and power.

Border Flows

A Century of the Canadian-American Water Relationship

by ed. by Lynne Heasley and Daniel MacFarlane

published by U of C Press

2016

Academic, Environmental, Water | 368

CDN $: 34.95

Declining access to fresh water is one of the twenty-first century’s most pressing environmental and human rights challenges, yet the struggle for water is not a new cause. The 8,800-kilometer border dividing Canada and the United States contains more than 20 percent of the world’s total freshwater resources, and Border Flows traces the century-long effort by Canada and the United States to manage and care for their ecologically and economically shared rivers and lakes. Ranging across the continent, from the Great Lakes to the Northwest Passage to the Salish Sea, the histories in Border Flows offer critical insights into the historical struggle to care for these vital waters. From multiple perspectives, the book reveals alternative paradigms in water history, law, and policy at scales from the local to the transnational. Students, concerned citizens, and policymakers alike will benefit from the lessons to be found along this critical international border.

Polaris

The Chief Scientist's Recollections of the American North Pole Expedition, 1871-73

by Translated and Edited by William Barr

published by U of C Press

2016

Academic, Environmental, Water | 672

CDN $: 44.95

Emil Bessels was chief scientist and medical officer on George Francis Hall’s ill-fated American North Pole Expedition of 1871-73 on board the ship Polaris. Bessels’ book, translated from the German in its entirety for the first time, is one of only two first-hand accounts of the voyage, and it is the only first-hand account of the experiences of the group which stayed with the ship after it ran afoul of arctic ice, leaving some of its crew stranded on an ice floe. Bessels and the others spent a second winter on shore in Northwest Greenland, where the drifting, disabled ship ran aground. Hall died suspiciously during the first winter, and Bessels is widely suspected of having poisoned him. Bill Barr has uncovered new evidence of a possible motive.

Polaris: The Chief Scientist’s Recollections of the American North pole Expedition, 1871-73 includes considerable detail which does not appear elsewhere.  It is the only account of the expedition which includes rich scientific information about anthropology, geology, flora and fauna. It provides much more information than other accounts on the Greenland settlements Polaris visited on her way north. Bessels’ is the only published first-hand account of the second wintering of part of the ship’s complement on shore at Polaris House, near Littleton Island, and of that party’s attempt at travelling south by boat until picked up by the Scottish whaler Ravenscraig. The same applies to the cruise aboard the whaler, Arctic, after Bessels and his companions transferred to that ship.

Essential reading for researchers and students of arctic exploration history, this book is also a compelling read for the interested general reader.

Zucchini Zone

by Jean Pare

published by Company's Coming (a division of Lone Pine)

2016

| 64

CDN $: 4.99

The versatile summer squash. Used in appetizers, tasty soups and sides, wonderful main courses and lovely sweet endings. Have you tried our Chocolate Zucchini Loaf? Maximize the uses for your harvest, and feel good all the while, as you serve up healthy, and delicious, dishes with Zucchini Zone. Another Guaranteed Great title from Company’s Coming. Explore all the books in this wonderful series and start your collection today.

Splendid Spuds

by Jean Pare

published by Company's Coming (an division of Lone Pine)

2016

| 64

CDN $: 4.99

“Splendid Spuds” puts the humble potato centre stage with this stylish collection of potato recipes by Company’s Coming, proving they aren’t just for mashing anymore! Peel away traditionally boiled, baked and mashed potatoes, and you’ll uncover the potato’s true versatility in selections of side dishes, appetizers, gnocchi, casseroles and potato bread. What a wonderfully easy way to create something new for dinner tonight. As part of our Focus Series, every dish in this collection of potato recipes from Company’s Coming is kitchen-tested, beautifully photographed and, as always, “Guaranteed Great”. Explore all the books in this wonderful series and start your collection today.

Anxiety and Related Disorders

Quick, Practical Solutions for Assessment and Management

by Dr/ Bianca Lauria-Horner

published by Brush Education

2016

Educational, Medical | 219

CDN $: 49.95

Primary care physicians know from experience how many patients come to them needing help with anxiety and related disorders: these disorders have a lifetime prevalence rate of 30%, but they often seem to be present in a much higher proportion of primary care visits.

Time pressure challenges every primary care provider who responds to these disorders. The Primary Care Toolkit for Anxiety and Related Disorders—carefully aligned with the DSM-5—gives you the tools to help you treat your patients promptly and effectively.

Quickly find the information and strategies you need using summaries of diagnostic criteria and pharmacological therapies, severity assessments, treatment summaries, and case studies.Efficiently screen, diagnose, and manage common anxiety and related disorders, using visit-by-visit guides for mild, moderate, and severe disorders.

An accompanying CD puts the best, most effective diagnostic tools at your fingertips, ready to be printed and used by you and your patients: patient self-report forms and questionnaires, symptom checklists, functional impairment assessment scales, and more.

The Complete Canadian Book Editor

by Leslie Vermeer

published by Brush Education

2016

Educational, Language | 392

CDN $: 49.95

The essential resource for aspiring and professional editors

Whether you are a student of the craft or a working editor, you need The Complete Canadian Book Editor.

From building and managing author relationships, through acquiring and developing manuscripts, to every level of text editing and proofing for print and ebooks, editors play integral roles in the operations of a book publishing house. In The Complete Canadian Book Editor, veteran editor and professor Leslie Vermeer sets out both the concepts and the processes that an effective editor must command.

Dr. Vermeer guides aspiring editors in presenting themselves successfully to employers and clients, and working editors will recognize the voice of a mentor in her advice about career advancement.

Editors at all levels—along with authors and self-publishers—will find in The Complete Canadian Book Editor all of the step-by-step editorial tools they need to take projects from promising beginnings to their full potential. With exercises throughout, The Complete Canadian Book Editor reinforces key concepts, and builds your skills as an expert editor.

Maria Tallchief

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2016

Aboriginal, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Maria Tallchief (1925-2013) was a famous prima ballerina. Born to a father from the Osage tribe and a mother with Scottish and Irish heritage, Maria Tallchief discovered her passion for ballet at the age of three. At 17, she moved to New York City, where she studied under and then married George Balanchine. Her dedication and hard work resulted in a style of dance that dazzled audiences around the world. Maria Tallchief retired from dance at the age of 40, but continued to support and inspire young ballerinas until her death at age 88.

Will Rogers

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2016

Aboriginal, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Will Rogers (1879-1935,) was born in the Indian Territory, now known as Oklahoma. His fascination with rope tricks and the lasso led him to perform on the vaudeville stage in North America and Europe. As his fame grew, he became a widely known movie actor, radio personality, and journalist. “I never met a man I didn’t like,” he once exclaimed. Will Rogers’ sunny smile was lost to the world when he died in a plane crash in Alaska.

Tommy Prince

by Terry Prince

published by Grassroots Press

2016

Aboriginal, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Tommy Prince (1915-1977) grew up on the Brokenhead Reserve, part of the Ojibway Nation. He joined the Canadian Army and quickly became a part of the Devil’s Brigade, a special unit, because of his stealth, marksmanship, paratrooping skills, and courage. He won a total of 11 medals during World War II and the Korean War. Although a forgotten hero in post-war years, Tommy Prince died a respected and honoured man by all Canadians as people came to know the story of this remarkable war hero and man.

Big Bear

by Terry Barber

published by Grassroots Press

2016

Aboriginal, ESL | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Big Bear was a famous Cree leader who hoped for peace between the white settlers and the Cree. He signed a peace treaty with the Blackfoot, believing that violence does not bring peace. He held out on signing Treaty 6 hoping to win more rights for his people. In the end, Big Bear had no choice but to sign the treaty. Broken promises led to bloodshed at Frog Lake and Fort Pitt in spite of Big Bear’s efforts to promote peace. Big Bear was found guilty of treason and imprisoned for one year. He died in 1888.

No Trace

by Brenda Chapman

published by Grassroots Press

2016

Fiction, Mystery | 87

CDN $: 9.95

Ryan Green disappears one day after school without a trace. His family is caught in a living nightmare. Six months later, the police have no leads. Desperate for answers, the parents contact private investigator Anna Sweet. The trail has gone cold, but Anna doesn’t give up without turning over every clue. When a body is found in the woods, Anna and the police fear the worst. Who would want to harm Ryan Green, and who will be next? Anna’s skills are about to be tested to their limits.

Journalism in a Small Place

Making Caribbean News Relevant, Comprehensive and Independent

by Juliette Storr

published by U of C Press

2016

Academic, Communications | 266

CDN $: 34.95

Journalism in a Small Place explores the changes and challenges in journalism and communication in the Caribbean in the twenty-first century. Tracing the history of media in the English speaking Caribbean, this book provides insight into the development of these industries from their inception under British imperial rule to their current focus on advancing national development in the post-independence period. The influence of US media on media content and cultural tastes, and the lingering effects of colonialism on media are also investigated, drawing on globalization theories of hybridity. Interviews with journalists, editors, and media owners in English speaking Caribbean countries provide firsthand insight into the profession and practice of journalism in the region, highlighting the social and cultural context in which the media industries operate.

Additionally, this book describes the current economic success of Caribbean journalism and the factors driving its new trends.  It provides an overview of the current state of Caribbean journalism as it reflects on these questions: What is the purpose of journalism in small Caribbean countries? What are the challenges of practicing journalism in the Caribbean in the twenty-first century? What is the future of journalism in the Caribbean? In response, Storr develops a theoretical and practical response to concerns of professional ethics, responsible performance, and the training and education of journalists in the region. In doing so, Journalism in a Small Place elucidates the impact of journalism and communication on the social, political, economic and cultural aspects of Caribbean people’s lived experiences, and journalism’s power to promote and effect social change.

Reading Vincent Van Gogh

A Thematic Guide to the Letters

by Patrick Grant

published by AU Press

2016

Academic, Art History | 184

CDN $: 24.95

Soon after his death, Vincent van Gogh’s reputation grew and developed through the extraordinary symbiosis evident between his paintings and letters. However it is a formidable task to read and analyze Van Gogh’s nearly eight hundred letters due to the sheer bulk and complexity of the collection. Reading Vincent van Gogh is at once an interpretive guide to the letters and a distillation of Van Gogh’s key themes and ideas. This indispensable, synoptic, and interpretive view of the letters as a whole will be equally of interest to scholars and teachers making use of Van Gogh’s letters as it will be to those who have long been fascinated by the artist.

This is the third book by Patrick Grant on the letters of Vincent van Gogh. It builds on his previous work in The Letters of Vincent van Gogh (2014), a practical-critical study, and “My Own Portrait in Writing” (2015), a literary theoretical analysis that draws on the domain of modern literary studies. In the hands of Patrick Grant, the extraordinary literary achievements of Vincent van Gogh are explained and exemplified and claims that the well-known artist was also a great writer are confirmed.

Counter-Blasting Canada

by ed. by Gregory Betts, Paul Hjartarson, and Kristine Sitka

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Academic, Communications | 344

CDN $: 49.95

In 1914, Wyndham Lewis and Ezra Pound—the founders of vorticism—undertook an unprecedented analysis of the present, its technologies, communication, politics, and architecture. The essays in Counterblasting Canada trace the influence of vorticism on Marshall McLuhan and Canadian Modernism. Building on the initial accomplishment of the magazine Blast, McLuhan’s subsequent Counterblast, and the network of artistic and intellectual relationships that flourished in Canadian vorticism, the contributors offer groundbreaking examinations of postwar Canadian literary culture, particularly the legacies of Sheila and Wilfred Watson. Intended primarily for scholars of literature and communications, Counterblasting Canada explores a crucial and long-overlooked strand in Canadian cultural and literary history.

Ten Canadian Writers in Context

by ed. by Marie Carriere, Curtis Gillespie & Jason Purcell

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Academic, literature | 216

CDN $: 24.95

Ten years, ten authors, ten critics.

The Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne reaches into its ten-year archive of Brown Bag Lunch readings to sample some of the most diverse and powerful voices in contemporary Canadian literature.

This anthology offers readers samples from some of Canada’s most exciting writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Each selection is introduced by a brief essay, serving as a point of entry into the writer’s work. From the east coast of Newfoundland to Kitamaat territory on British Columbia’s central coast, there is a story for everyone, from everywhere. True to Canada’s multilingual and multicultural heritage, these ten writers come from diverse ethnicities and backgrounds, and work in multiple languages, including English, French, and Cree.

The Woman Priest

A Translation of Sylvain Marechal's Novella

by Translated by Shelia Delany

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Academic, literature, Women's Studies | 104

CDN $: 19.95

“My God! Pardon me if I have dared to make sacred things serve a profane love; but it is you who have put passion into our hearts; they are not crimes—I feel this in the purity of my intentions.” —Agatha, writing to Zoé

In pre-revolutionary Paris, a young woman falls for a handsome young priest. To be near him, she dresses as a man, enters his seminary, and is invited to become a fully ordained Catholic priest—a career forbidden to women then as now. Sylvain Maréchal’s epistolary novella offers a biting rebuke to religious institutions and a hypocritical society; its views on love, marriage, class, and virtue remain relevant today. The book ends in La Nouvelle France, which became part of British-run Canada during Maréchal’s lifetime. With thorough notes and introduction by Sheila Delany, this first translation of Maréchal’s novella, La femme abbé, brings a little-known but revelatory text to the attention of readers interested in French history and literature, history of the novel, women’s studies, and religious studies.

Crow Never Dies

Life on the Great Hunt

by Larry Frolick

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Aboriginal, Travel | 304

CDN $: 29.95

“It was a different crow, but the same crow, you understand? Because there is only one Crow. God made them all black and identical-looking because there is no reason for them to be different birds. That’s why you can never kill a crow, because it lives forever. Crow never dies!” — James Itsi

For over 50,000 years, the Great Hunt has shaped human existence, creating a vital spiritual reality where people, animals, and the land share intimate bonds. Author Larry Frolick takes the reader deep into one of the last refuges of hunting societies: Canada’s far north. Based on his experiences travelling with First Nations Elders in remote communities across the Northwest Territories, Yukon, and Nunavut, this vivid narrative combines accounts of daily life, unpublished archival records, First Nations stories and traditional knowledge with personal observation to illuminate the northern wilderness, its people, and the complex relationships that exist among them.

Rising Abruptly

Stories

by Gisele Villeneuve

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

literature, Mountain | 216

CDN $: 24.95

Gisèle Villeneuve’s short stories test the elastic pull between passion and terror. For inspiration, Villeneuve turned to her personal history to examine what lures urban dwellers outdoors, to test themselves against peaks and valleys. Using the overarching metaphor of mountain climbing, she plays with form, language, and narrative to reveal our fears, our loves, our passions. Rising Abruptly is a perfect companion for anyone who likes to travel, loves a climber, or simply glories in the allure of the mountains.

“Even the unassuming day trips deliver their moments. The whiteouts. The going off route. Scrambling back down on rock coated with verglas. Neither of us liking it one bit, but resolutely descending. Focusing on the moment that could change everything with one misstep. The four-hour scramble that begins on a sunny summer morning, stretching into the night to a seventeen-hour epic. There are such days, and they can happen an hour’s drive from Calgary on a relatively small mountain.

Back to comfort, talking up a storm. Doing the post-mortem. Watching the tempest, still so real in our minds, relief and excitement printed on our windburned faces. Together, building story, across time and across silences.

Back to comfort then acquires a whole new meaning when you bear the land deep in the bone.”

The Extra Cadaver Murder

An Inspector Coswell Mystery

by Roy Innes

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction | 370

CDN $: 15.95

RCMP Inspector Coswell is back in The Extra Cadaver Murder. A university professor is garroted and his corpse is discovered in spectacular fashion—nude on a slab alongside shrouded medical cadavers prepared for a first year anatomy class. The Inspector begins his investigation with Corporal James, his long-time assistant, but is abruptly assigned a new partner: Corporal Bostock, a female officer who arrives under a political cloud. Already depressed by his perceived plunge into senility, Coswell struggles to stifle his own gender biases and work with his new colleague. As they delve into the victim’s affairs, the list of suspects grows: failed students, a jealous colleague, an alluring ex-wife, and even a criminal cartel.

The city of Vancouver is highlighted as the officers follow clues that take them to the downtown with its gourmet restaurants, Stanley Park, spectacular English Bay, the sprawling UBC campus, and the Vancouver General Hospital.

Lost Animal Club

by Kevin Couture

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction | 160

CDN $: 19.95

In his debut story collection, Kevin A. Couture creates a world where the veneer of humanness stretches thin and often cracks as a menagerie of burdened characters reveal their beast-like traits. In his desperate survival plan, a pre-teen “rescues” dogs in order to sell them back to their well-off owners; a marathon pacesetter reflects on the pace she sets both on and off the race route, as she navigates her imperfect marriage; a man confronts his drive for alcohol and the deadly and isolating consequences that leave him to risk his last scrap of control; and two kids, for different reasons, execute their plan to capture a bear cub.
Lost Animal Club combines murky sensibilities with finely rendered, precise prose. The writing is gripping and honest, with metaphors and similes as startling as the harsh choices the characters make.

Border Markers

by Jenny Ferguson

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction | 104

CDN $: 15.95

After the accidental death of a teenaged friend, the Lansing family has split along fault lines previously hidden under a patina of suburban banality. Every family has secrets, but for the Lansings those secrets end up propelling them in different directions away from their border town to foreign shores and to prison.

Told in thirty-three flash fiction narratives, Border Markers is fractured like the psyches of its characters, all keen edges and tough language. It’s a slice of prairie noir that straddles the line between magical and gritty realism. Jenny Ferguson’s debut is a compelling collection of commonplace tragedies and surprising insights.

Paper Teeth

Stories

by Lauralyn Chow

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction | 240

CDN $: 19.95

Lauralyn Chow’s debut, Paper Teeth, follows the lives of the Lees, a Canadian-Chinese family and their friends who reside in Edmonton, Alberta. While playing with time and place, from Edmonton in the 1960s and 70s up to present-day Calgary, Lauralyn Chow creates a world of walking dolls, family car trips, fashion and frosty makeup, home renovations inspired by pop culture, and moving up to big, new houses. The interconnected stories found in Paper Teeth are fun, funny, and heart-warming journeys about the pursuit of identity and the crafting of home.

With domestic tomfoolery and through deft observation and prismatic-voiced humour—including ironic asides—Lauralyn Chow reveals how family nourishes hope.

Where the Truth Lies

by Rudy Wiebe

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction | 300

CDN $: 24.95

“The problem with writer longevity can be a complicating, even contradictory oeuvre. Hopefully.”

Rudy Wiebe’s Where The Truth Lies collects forty years of essays and speeches that the award-winning author has crafted. In this illuminating and wide-ranging selection, Wiebe provides a look behind the curtain, revealing his thought processes as he worked on many of his great books. Throughout this book, he dissects controversies that arose after the publication of his early novels, meditates on words and their inherent power, explores the great Canadian North and the Canadian body politic, reckons with his family history and Mennonite faith, all while providing an engaging and enlightening commentary. Where The Truth Lies is a vital compilation of a writing life.

Farm Workers in Western Canada

Injustices and Activism

by ed. by Shirley McDonald and Bob Barnetson

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Agriculture, Labour Relations | 256

CDN $: 29.95

Bill 6, the government of Alberta’s contentious farm workers’ safety legislation, sparked public debate as no other legislation has done in recent years. The Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act provides a right to work safely and a compensation system for those killed or injured at work, similar to other provinces.

In nine essays, contributors to Farm Workers in Western Canada place this legislation in context. They look at the origins, work conditions, and precarious lives of farm workers in terms of larger historical forces such as colonialism, land rights, and racism. They also examine how the rights and privileges of farm workers, including seasonal and temporary foreign workers, conflict with those of their employers, and reveal the barriers many face by being excluded from most statutory employment laws, sometimes in violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Seeking Order in Anarchy

Multilateralism as State Strategy

by ed. by Robert Murray

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

International Relations, Political Science | 296

CDN $: 34.95

“The idea of multilateralism is not something that can be forced on states, nor does it come naturally to them.” —Tom Keating

Seeking Order in Anarchy offers insights into both the theoretical foundations and the real-world outcomes of multilateralism in world affairs. Recognizing that Tom Keating’s theories, though rooted in Canadian foreign policy, have a broader application in international relations, Robert W. Murray has assembled an array of theoretical interpretations of multilateralism, as well as case studies examining its practical effects. Drawing from the insights of fourteen noted scholars and featuring an essay from Tom Keating himself, this volume examines the conditions that encourage states to adopt multilateral strategies, and the consequences of doing so in the context of increasingly complex global politics. Seeking Order in Anarchy is an important book for scholars, graduate students, policy makers, and anyone interested in how multilateralism functions in today’s world.

Imagining the Supernatural North

by ed. by Elanor Barraclough, Danielle Cudmore & Stefan Honecker

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

Northern Studies, Spirituality | 352

CDN $: 29.95

“Turning to face north, face the north, we enter our own unconscious. Always, in retrospect, the journey north has the quality of dream.” Margaret Atwood, “True North”

In this interdisciplinary collection, sixteen scholars from twelve countries explore the notion of the North as a realm of the supernatural. This region has long been associated with sorcerous inhabitants, mythical tribes, metaphysical forces of good and evil, and a range of supernatural qualities. It was both the sacred abode of the gods and a feared source of menacing invaders and otherworldly beings. Whether from the perspective of traditional Jewish lore or of contemporary black metal music, few motifs in European cultural history show such longevity and broad appeal.

Surviving the Gulag

A German Woman's Memoir

by Ilse Johansen ed. by Heather Marshall, translation by Hans Gahler

published by University of Alberta Press

2016

History, Memoir, Women's Studies | 296

CDN $: 34.95

“The terrified yell of my comrades makes me stop. I drop the potatoes into the grass and turn around. He has pulled out the pistol and is taking aim. Slowly I come back.”

Surviving the Gulag is the first-person account of a resourceful woman who survived five grueling years in Russian prison camps: starved, traumatized, and worked nearly to death. A story like Ilse Johansen’s is rarely told—of a woman caught in the web of fascism and communism at the end of the Second World War and beginning of the Cold War. The candid story of her time as a prisoner, written soon after her release, provides startling insight into the ordeal of a German female prisoner under Soviet rule. Readers of memoir and history, and students of feminism and war studies, will learn more about women’s experience of the Soviet gulag through the eyes of Ilse Johansen.

Canada Alphabet Book

by Nicky Bird and Peter Duncan

published by Folklore Publishing (iThink Books)

2016

Children's, Education | 30

CDN $: 6.99

Learn about our country and all the wonderful places and people in it. More than just the letters of the alphabet, these books contain fascinating tidbits about Canada in full colour with illustrations and photos. Not only will these books teach children about Canada while they learn their letters, but parents may learn a thing or two as well!

“B” is for Beaver—our official national animal. “C” is for Canada—our country strong and free. “M” is for Maple Leaf—the symbol on our flag. “Z” is for Zed—the way Canadians say the letter, not Zee!

Hockey Alphabet Book

by Nicky Bird and Peter Duncan

published by Folklore Publishing (iThink Books)

2016

Children's, Education | 30

CDN $: 6.99

Learn about the sport of hockey, take an alphabet journey all about Canada’s national game. More than just the letters of the alphabet, these books contain fascinating tidbits about our national sport in full colour with illustrations and photos. Not only will these books teach children about hockey while they learn their letters, but parents may learn a thing or two as well!

“H” is for Hockey—Canada’s favourite game. “I” is for Ice—we skate on it to play hockey. “R” is for Referee—he blows the whistle to signal a penalty. “Z” is for Zamboni—the big machine that goes round and round and cleans the ice.

Canadian Animals Alphabet Book

by Nicky Bird and Peter Duncan

published by Folklore Publishing (iThink Books)

2016

Children's, Educational | 30

CDN $: 6.99

Learn about our country and take an alphabet journey through Canada and find out about the unique animals of our country. More than just the letters of the alphabet, these books contain fascinating tidbits about Canada and the wilderness that makes up so much of our nation with illustrations and photos. Not only will these books teach children about Canadian animals while they learn their letters, but parents may learn a thing or two as well!

“B” is for Beaver—our official national animal. “E” is for Eagle—soaring over the mountains and forests. “G” is for Grizzly Bear—a large brown bear with long claws and a big hump on its shoulders. “W” is for Walrus—a huge lumbering animal with tusks that lives in the North

Stop Making Art and Die

by Rich Theroux

published by Durvile Publications (UpRoute Bright Books with Bite)

2016

Colouring Book | 208

CDN $: 22.95

Far beyond a mere colouring book, Stop Making Art and Die: Survival Activities for Artists is the first adult activity book that makes it impossible not to succeed and flourish as an artist. Written and illustrated by Rich Theroux, Calgary, Alberta’s Gorilla House and Rumble House founder, the book gets you not only drawing, colouring, and designing, but immerses you into the meaning and wellbeing of art. The brilliantly creative Théroux also relates a story of artists overcoming struggles and obstacles to build an artists’ Bohemia that is destroyed time and again, leaving only masterpieces in its wake.

Suitable for visual artists and aspiring artists of all types, Stop Making Art and Die provides great colouring and artist how-to projects while, at the same time, encouraging a deeper understanding of artistic practice and philosophy. Printed on high quality, thick paper, the pages are perfect for drawing and designing with markers, gel pens, watercolours, or pencil crayons.

Without Apology

Writings on Abortion in Canada

by ed. by Shannon Stettler

published by AU Press

2016

Women's Studies | 355

CDN $: 29.95

Until the late 1960s, the authorities on abortion were for the most part men—politicians, clergy, lawyers, physicians, all of whom had an interest in regulating women’s bodies. Even today, when we hear women speak publicly about abortion, the voices are usually those of the leaders of women’s and abortion rights organizations, women who hold political office, and, on occasion, female physicians. We also hear quite frequently from spokeswomen for anti-abortion groups. Rarely, however, do we hear the voices of ordinary women—women whose lives have been in some way touched by abortion. Their thoughts typically owe more to human circumstance than to ideology, and without them, we run the risk of thinking and talking about the issue of abortion only in the abstract.

Without Apology seeks to address this issue by gathering the voices of activists, feminists, and scholars as well as abortion providers and clinic support staff alongside the stories of women whose experience with abortion is more personal. With the particular aim of moving beyond the polarizing rhetoric that has characterized the issue of abortion and reproductive justice for so long, Without Apology is an engrossing and arresting account that will promote both reflection and discussion.

The Frontier of Patriotism

Alberta and the First World War

by ed by Adriana Davies and Jeff Keshen

published by U of C press

2016

History, Military | 608

CDN $: 49.95

With the centenary of the First World War, communities across Canada arranged commemorations of the war experience to honour local servicemen who, through their triumphs and sacrifices, were presented as laying the foundation for a free and independent country. Often overlooked are the triumphs and sacrifices of those who supported those soldiers, and the war effort in general, back at home. The Frontier of Patriotism provides an in-depth look at all aspects of Alberta’s involvement in the war, reflecting Albertans’ experiences both on the battlefield and on the home front. Contributors of the 40 essays all draw heavily on national and local archival resources. The war is seen through the letters, diaries and memoirs of the individuals who lived through it, as well as through accounts in local newspapers.

Readers will come away from this collection with a deeper appreciation of the different ways that the First World War, and its aftermath, shaped the lives of Albertans. For many, these four tumultuous years represented a time of individual valour and of communities pulling together and sacrificing for a noble cause. Yet, for others, the war left disillusionment and anger. Exploring these regional and local stories, as well as the national story, helps us understand the commonalities and distinctiveness of what it means to be Canadian. The Frontier of Patriotism is the most comprehensive treatment of Alberta during these critical, transformational years.

Teardown

by Clea Young

published by Freehand Books

2016

Fiction | 225

CDN $: 19.95

Her stories seize on instances that, at the outset, appear benign—a woman encountering an old boyfriend on a BC ferry, a father chaperoning his daughter’s class on a field trip, a young waitress’ burgeoning friendship with a co-worker—but are in fact fraught, often pivotal times in her characters’ lives.

The stories in this arresting debut collection are populated with people you know and people you’ve been. They’re arguing about lamps in IKEA, drinking gin and tonics on a dock in summer, unemployed and without prospects. But under Young’s astute gaze they are anything but ordinary. With sharp, invigorated prose she guides us through shoals and rapids alike, along the way paying homage to our missteps, our foibles, and ultimately to the complicated hearts that comprise a life.

The Weather Inside

by Emily Saso

published by Freehand Books

2016

Fiction | 285

CDN $: 21.95

Avery Gauthier can’t get far enough away from her past: the death of her beloved father, the abuse she suffered as a teen, and the religion that tore her parents apart. A reality-refugee, she’s managed to keep the chaos of her former life at bay… until now.

When her husband returns to the Jehovah’s Witnesses, her estranged mother wants back in, and the snow—invisible to everyone but Avery—piles up and up and up, Avery is forced to face her greatest fears. She looks to the outside for help, to her mysterious superintendent and the comforts of a local weatherman, only to realize that the solutions lie where the problem does: within.

A twisted, darkly funny and redemptive tale, The Weather Inside will leave you wondering where the line is drawn between what’s real and what’s imagined, and why Armageddon isn’t always the end of the world.

Porcupines to Polar Bears

Adventures of a Wildlife Veterinarian

by Jerry Haigh

published by Dragon Hill

2016

Nature, Wildlife | 303

CDN $: 18.95

Storyteller Jerry Haigh shares his adventures as a wildlife veterinarian with the University of Saskatchewan and coming from a clinic at the base of spectacular Mount Kenya in Africa to the flat lands of the Canadian prairies in Saskatchewan. He worked with wild animals such as moose, polar bears and even a toothless old lion: • George the resident lion of the Forestry Farm Zoo, suddenly off his feed because a tooth infection, needed a couple of stainless steel crowns, accomplished by Jerry and his team of four dentists! • His study of the best cocktail of drugs for immobilizing various species brought Jerry in contact with researchers of black, grizzly and polar bears, bison, moose and many others • “Where Men Walk with Moose,” an episode of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom, followed Jerry along with Bob Stewart’s team of moose researchers from the Department of Natural Resources • When the director of the Calgary Zoo needed dentistry for Foggy the Hippo, he turned to Jerry with his skill at immobilizing a wide variety of species and his ingenuity with a Gigli saw • Jerry and his family were called upon to bottle raise and find other ingenious ways to save a black bear cub orphaned by an earthmover • At the invitation of Ray Schweinsburg, polar bear biologist for the Northwest Territories, Haigh spent time at Pond Inlet (now Qikiqtaaluk) on the eastern shore of Baffin Island using his specialized techniques for animal immobilization and collecting samples for research on this iconic Canadian wild animal. And many more heart-warming and exciting stories from a time when being a wildlife veterinarian was a rare occupation!

Visiting With the Ancestors

Blackfoot Shirts in Museum Spaces

by Laura Peers & Alison K. Brown

published by AU Press

2016

Aboriginal, History | 217

CDN $: 39.95

In 2010, five magnificent Blackfoot shirts, now owned by the University of Oxford’s Pitt Rivers Museum, were brought to Alberta to be exhibited at the Glenbow Museum, in Calgary, and the Galt Museum, in Lethbridge. The shirts had not returned to Blackfoot territory since 1841, when officers of the Hudson’s Bay Company acquired them. The shirts were later transported to England, where they had remained ever since.

Exhibiting the shirts at the museums was, however, only one part of the project undertaken by Laura Peers and Alison Brown. Prior to the installation of the exhibits, groups of Blackfoot people—hundreds altogether—participated in special “handling sessions,” in which they were able to touch the shirts and examine them up close. The shirts, some painted with mineral pigments and adorned with porcupine quillwork, others decorated with locks of human and horse hair, took the breath away of those who saw, smelled, and touched them. Long-dormant memories were awakened, and many of the participants described a powerful sense of connection and familiarity with the shirts, which still house the spirit of the ancestors who wore them.

In the pages of this beautifully illustrated volume is the story of an effort to build a bridge between museums and source communities, in hopes of establishing stronger, more sustaining relationships between the two and spurring change in prevailing museum policies. Negotiating the tension between a museum’s institutional protocol and Blackfoot cultural protocol was challenging, but the experience described both by the authors and by Blackfoot contributors to the volume was transformative. Museums seek to preserve objects for posterity. This volume demonstrates that the emotional and spiritual power of objects does not vanish with the death of those who created them. For Blackfoot people today, these shirts are a living presence, one that evokes a sense of continuity and inspires pride in Blackfoot cultural heritage.

The Frontier of Patriotism

Alberta and the First World War

by Adriana A. Davies (Editor) Jeff Keshen (Editor)

published by University of Calgary Press

2016

Alberta, Canadian History, Non-Fiction | 608 pages

CDN $: $49.95 CAD / $49.95 USD

With the centenary of the First World War, communities across Canada arranged commemorations of the war experience to honour local servicemen who, through their triumphs and sacrifices, were presented as laying the foundation for a free and independent country. Often overlooked are the triumphs and sacrifices of those who supported those soldiers, and the war effort in general, back at home. The Frontier of Patriotism provides an in-depth look at all aspects of Alberta’s involvement in the war, reflecting Albertans’ experiences both on the battlefield and on the home front. Contributors of the 40 essays all draw heavily on national and local archival resources. The war is seen through the letters, diaries and memoirs of the individuals who lived through it, as well as through accounts in local newspapers.

Readers will come away from this collection with a deeper appreciation of the different ways that the First World War, and its aftermath, shaped the lives of Albertans. For many, these four tumultuous years represented a time of individual valour and of communities pulling together and sacrificing for a noble cause. Yet, for others, the war left disillusionment and anger. Exploring these regional and local stories, as well as the national story, helps us understand the commonalities and distinctiveness of what it means to be Canadian. The Frontier of Patriotism is the most comprehensive treatment of Alberta during these critical, transformational years.

Vulnerability and Adaptation to Drought

The Canadian Prairies and South America

by Harry Diaz, Margot Hurlbert and Jim Warren

published by University of Calgary Press

2016

Agriculture, Environmental, Non-Fiction | 375

CDN $: 34.95

Although there is considerable historical literature describing the social and economic impact of drought on the prairies in the 1930s, little has been written about the challenges presented by drought in more contemporary times. The drought of 2001-02 was, for example, the most recent large-area, intense, and prolonged drought in Canada and one of Canada’s most costly natural disasters in a century.

Vulnerability and Adaptation to Drought describes the impacts of droughts and the adaptations made in prairie agriculture over recent decades. These adaptations have enhanced the capacity of rural communities to withstand drought. However, despite the high levels of technical adaptation that have occurred, and the existing human capital and vibrant social and information networks, agricultural producers in the prairie region remain vulnerable to severe droughts that last more than a couple of years. Research findings and projections suggest that droughts could become more frequent, more severe, and of longer duration in the region over the course of the 21st century. This book provides insights into the conditions generating these challenges and the measures required to reduce vulnerability of prairie communities to them. Developing greater understanding of the social forces and conditions that have contributed to enhanced resilience, as well as those which detract from successful adaptation, is a principal theme of the book. To that end, the book examines drought through an interdisciplinary lens encompassing climate science and the social sciences. Two of the chapters are based on the drought experiences of other countries in order to provide a comparative assessment.

Living on the Land

Indigenous Women's Understanding of Place

by ed. Nathalie Kermoal and Isabel Altamirano-Jimenez

published by AU Press

2016

Indigenous, Non-Fiction, Women's Studies | 217

CDN $: 27.95

Living on the Land examines how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism have shaped the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowers and producers of knowledge. From a variety of methodological perspectives, contributors to the volume explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women’s knowledge, its rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and its inseparability from land and landscape. From the reconstruction of cultural and ecological heritage by Naskapi women in Québec to the medical expertise of Métis women in western Canada to the mapping and securing of land rights in Nicaragua, Living on the Land focuses on the integral role of women as stewards of the land and governors of the community. Together, these contributions point to a distinctive set of challenges and possibilities for Indigenous women and their communities.

Perfect World

by Ian Collard

published by Freehand Books

2016

Fiction | 185

CDN $: 19.95

Tom Brackett has created the perfect world for himself, despite all odds: he has a good job, a perpetually supportive wife, two kids, a mini-van, and even a golden retriever.

But then, his mental instability causes him to commit a terrifying act of violence.

Tom’s story, which is at once tragic and hopeful, shows how quickly familiar structures can crumble and raises the question of how we can possibly prepare ourselves for the loss of everything we hold dear. It dramatizes a man’s struggle to maintain control over his own life under horrific circumstances. Though offering no solution, its message is a positive one: that the struggle is worth the effort.

Mildenrammers

by John Bart

published by Freehand Books

2016

Fiction | 180

CDN $: 21.95

It’s 1968.

In Paris and Berlin, student protests are resulting in a full-on workers’ revolt. Medical student Brian Davis is at the centre of it all. Meanwhile, in East Yorkshire, folk hero Lillian Bilocca is spearheading a revolution to ensure safer working conditions for fishermen. Sweport local Helena Woods (known to everyone as “Woodie”) is marching along beside her.

Two years later, Dr. Brian Davis arrives at Sweport Maternity Hospital as a young doctor, intending to leave his days of protest behind him. But then he meets Woodie, a midwife who has a fire in her belly, an insatiable desire for social justice, and a deep-rooted connection with her community.

Dr. Davis and Woodie are faced with hospital administrators who are doing everything in their power to prevent the staff from giving contraceptive advice or abortions. As a doctor and a midwife, the pair comes face-to-face with these destructive policies on a daily basis. In simply trying to do what is right for the patients and the town, they find themselves in the midst of a different kind of revolution.

White Elephant

by Catherine Cooper

published by Freehand Books

2016

Fiction | 350

CDN $: 21.95

Set in Sierra Leone in the early 1990s, White Elephant centres around the Berringers, a troubled Nova Scotian family who decide to abandon their recently-completed dream home in Canada and move to a village in northern Sierra Leone, despite warnings that the West African country is in a civil war. When the novel begins, Richard Berringer, a physician, his wife, Ann, and their thirteen-year-old son, Torquil, have been in Sierra Leone for two months, and things are not going well. Plagued by mysterious allergies and a series of tropical illnesses and trying unsuccessfully to broker a peace between her embattled husband and son, Ann is desperate to heal herself and her family. Richard, unable to tolerate Torquil’s behaviour or continue feigning sympathy for Ann’s ailments, takes solace in the satisfaction of practicing tropical medicine–but a mounting conflict with his boss threatens to put an end to that. Meanwhile, Torquil—who hates Sierra Leone almost as much as he hates his father—has gone on a hunger strike in an effort to convince his mother to take him back to Canada. As the story progresses, both the war and the family’s domestic hostilities escalate, and like their impossible-to-sell home, the dream of harmonious family life that it represented also proves itself to be a white elephant—something so dear that it becomes a burden.

Health and Safety in Canadian Workplaces

by Jason Foster and Bob Barnetson

published by AU Press

2016

Occupational Safety | 255

CDN $: 29.95

Workplace injuries happen every day and can profoundly affect workers, their families, and the communities in which they live. This textbook is for workers and students looking for an introduction to injury prevention on the job. It offers an extensive overview of central occupational health and safety (OHS) concepts and practices and provides practical suggestions for health and safety advocacy. Foster and Barnetson bring the field into the twenty-first century by including discussions of how precarious employment, gender, and ill-health can be better handled in Canadian OHS.

Although they address the gendered and racialized dimensions of new work processes and structures in contemporary workplaces, Foster and Barnetson contend that the practice of occupational health and safety can only be understood if we acknowledge that workers and employers have conflicting interests. Who identifies what workplace hazards should be controlled is therefore a product of the broader political economy of employment and one that should be well understood by those working in the field.

Mega Machines: Excavators and Diggers

published by Blue Bike Books

2016

Children's | 64

CDN $: 6.99

This book for older children details some of the best, and the biggest, excavators and diggers in the world.

Mega Machines: Big Trucks

published by Blue Bike Books

2016

Children's | 64

CDN $: 6.99

This book for older children details big trucks of all kinds and the work that they do.

From Kinshasa to Kandahar

Canada and Fragile States in Historical Perspective

by Ed. by Michael Carroll and Greg Donaghy

published by University of Calgary Press

2016

Canadian History, Military | 290

CDN $: 34.95

Failed or fragile states are those that are unable or unwilling to provide a socio-political framework for citizens and meet their basic needs. They are a source of terrorism and international crime, as well as incubators of infectious disease, environmental degradation, and unregulated mass migration. Canada’s engagement with countries such as the Congo, East Timor, Bosnia, and Afghanistan underlines the commitment of successive Canadian governments to addressing the threats posed to Western security by state fragility.

From Kinshasa to Kandahar: Canada and Fragile States in Historical Perspective brings together leading Canadian historians and political scientists to explore Canada’s historic relationship with fragile states. The collection spans the period from the 1960s to the present and covers a geographical range that stretches from the Middle East to Latin America to Southeast Asia. Authors embrace a variety of approaches and methodologies, including traditional archival historical research, postmodern textual analysis, oral history, and administrative studies to chronicle and explain Canada’s engagement with fragile and failed states.

Moving Natures

Mobility and the Environment in Canadian History

by ed. Ben Bradley, Jay Young and Colin Coates

published by U of C Press

2016

Environment, History | 338

CDN $: 34.95

Mobility – the movements of people, things, and ideas, as well as their associated cultural meanings – has been a key factor in shaping Canadians’ perceptions of and interactions with their country. Approaching the burgeoning field of environmental history in Canada through the lens of mobility reveals some of the distinctive ways in which Canadians have come to terms with the country’s climate and landscape.

Spanning Canada’s diverse regions, throughout its history, from the closing of the age of sail to the contemporary era of just-on-time delivery, Moving Natures: Mobility and the Environment in Canadian History examines a wide range of topics, from the impact of seasonal climactic conditions on different transportation modes, to the environmental consequences of building mobility corridors and pathways, to the relationship between changing forms of mobility with tourism and other recreational activities. Contributors make use of traditional archival sources, as well as historical geographic information systems (HGIS), qualitative and quantitative analysis, and critical theory.

This thought-provoking collection divides the intersection of environmental and mobility history into two approaches. The chapters in the first section deal primarily with the construction and productive use of mobility technologies and infrastructure, as well as their environmental constraints and consequences. The chapters in the second section focus on consumers’ uses of those vehicles and pathways: on pleasure travel, tourism, and recreational mobility. Together, they highlight three quintessentially Canadian themes: seasonality, links between mobility and natural resource development, and urbanites’ experiences of the environment through mobility.

Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning

Foundations and Applications

by ed. by George Veletsianos

published by AU Press

2016

Educational | 215

CDN $: 39.95

Educational systems worldwide are facing an enormous shift as a result of sociocultural, political, economic, and technological changes. The technologies and practices that have developed over the last decade have been heralded as opportunities to transform both online and traditional education systems. While proponents of these new ideas often postulate that they have the potential to address the educational problems facing both students and institutions and that they could provide an opportunity to rethink the ways that education is organized and enacted, there is little evidence of emerging technologies and practices in use in online education. Because researchers and practitioners interested in these possibilities often reside in various disciplines and academic departments the sharing and dissemination of their work across often rigid boundaries is a formidable task.

Shrunk

Crime and Disorders of the Mind

by ed. Lorene Shyba and Thomas Dalby

published by Durvile Publications

2016

Non-Fiction, Psychiatry | 260

CDN $: 24.95

SHRUNK: Crime and Disorders of the Mind is a collection of powerful chapters by eminent Canadian and international forensic psychologists and psychiatrists who write about mental health issues they face and what they are doing about it. Unlike any other book within the genre of True Crime, SHRUNK is the first book that delves deeply into the disturbed human psyche to help build a solution to the problem of understanding mental illness within the criminal justice system.We asked our forensics experts to tell stories about cases that still haunt them. Among the stories in the book are: Dr. Joel Watts on Luka Magnotta; Dr. J. Thomas Dalby on serial killer Clifford Olson; Dr. Jeffrey Waldman on Vince Li and the Greyhound Bus tragedy; Mr. Justice Richard D. Schneider on a typical day in Mental Health Court; Dr. Sven Å. Christenson on a Swedish case of psychopathic personality and media manipulation; Dr. Jack White on the most notorious Australian serial killing of all time; Dr. Louise Olivier on a case of dissociative fugue in South Africa; Dr. Donald Dutton on an American case of mind-control and folie à deux; Dr. Stephen Porter and Tianna Dilley on brain damage and extreme amnesia; Dr. Barry Cooper and Jacqueline Kanipayur on malingering; Dr. Marc Nesca on catathymic murder and necrophilia; Dr. Patrick Baillie on David Milgaard’s wrongful conviction; Dr. Lawrence Ellerby on deviance to rehabilitation; and Dr. David Dawson finds moments of warmth and shared humanity with psychiatric patients. Criminal defence lawyer William Trudell writes about working with forensic experts and their contributions in the defence of those suffering from mental disorders.

Community Nutrition for Developing Communities

by Norman J. Temple and Nelia Steyn

published by AU Press

2016

Nutrition | 492

CDN $: 34.95

Nutrition textbooks used by universities and colleges in developing countries have very often been written by scholars who live and work in North America or the United Kingdom. And while the research and information they present is sound, the nutrition-related health challenges with which developing countries must grapple differ considerably from those found in highly industrialized Western nations. The primary aim of Community Nutrition for Developing Countries is to provide a book that meets the needs of nutritionists and other health professionals living and working in developing countries. Written by both scholars and practitioners, the volume draws on their wealth of knowledge, experience, and understanding of nutrition in developing countries to provide nutrition professionals with all the information they require. Each chapter addresses a specific nutrition challenge currently faced by developing countries such as food security, food safety, disease prevention, maternal health, and effective nutrition policy. In addition, the volume serves as an invaluable resource for those developing and implementing nutrition education programmes. With an emphasis on nutritional education as a means to prevent disease and effectively manage health disorders, it is the hope of the nearly three dozen contributors to this work that it will enhance the health and well-being of low-income populations throughout the world.

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

by Edited by David Taras and Christopher Waddell

published by AU Press

2016

Communications, Scholarly | 390

CDN $: 39.95

Fewer Canadians than ever are lacing up skates, swimming lengths at the pool, practicing their curve ball, and experiencing the thrill of competition. However, despite a decline in active participation, Canadians spend enormous amounts of time and money on sports, as fans and followers of sporting events and sports culture. Never has media coverage of sports been more exhaustive, and never has it been more driven by commercial interests and the need to fuel consumerism, on which corporate profits depend. The power plays now occurring in the arena of sports are by no means solely a matter of money, however. At issue as well in the media capture of sports are the values that inform our daily lives, the physical and emotional health of the population, and the symbols so long central to a sense of Canadian identity.

Learning in Virtual Worlds

Research and Applications

by ed. Sue Gregory, Mark Lee, Barney Dalgarno and Belinda Tynan

published by AU Press

2016

Educational, Scholarly | 320

CDN $: 39.95

Three-dimensional (3D) immersive virtual worlds have been touted as being capable of facilitating highly interactive, engaging, multimodal learning experiences. Much of the evidence gathered to support these claims has been anecdotal but the potential that these environments hold to solve traditional problems in online and technology-mediated education—primarily learner isolation and student disengagement—has resulted in considerable investments in virtual world platforms like Second Life, OpenSimulator, and Open Wonderland by both professors and institutions. To justify this ongoing and sustained investment, institutions and proponents of simulated learning environments must assemble a robust body of evidence that illustrates the most effective use of this powerful learning tool.

Indiana Pulcinella

A Detective Lane Mystery

by Garry Ryan

published by NeWest Press

2016

Detective, Fiction | 221

CDN $: 18.95

After saving the Calgary Stampede from a potential terror attack in Glycerine, Detectives Lane and Li find themselves on the hunt yet again, this time following a pair of gruesome killers whose perfectly composed crime scenes match those of an inmate put away by Calgary Police years earlier. As more people come into the line of fire, Lane must team up with some unlikely new allies in order to crack the case.

Meanwhile, with the birth of a new nephew, the happily chaotic Lane household must deal with the taciturn detective’s estranged, fundamentalist family and their efforts to interfere in raising the child.

Where the Bodies Lie

by Mark Lisac

published by NeWest Press

2016

Fiction, Mystery | 246

CDN $: 20.95

“Sins don’t destroy people here. Dreams do.”

In a small city somewhere in an oil-rich Canadian province just east of the Rockies, a political scandal has erupted: an aging cabinet minister has struck and killed a member of his local constituency executive with his half-ton truck, in broad daylight. But the premier suspects that there is more to this “accident” than meets the eye—and he wants to know the real reasons behind it before the media or his political rivals do.

Enter the premier’s old friend Harry Asher—lawyer, former hockey star, self-styled intellectual, and recent divorcé—who is hired to dig into the incident. And it isn’t long before Asher’s investigation threatens to expose a chain of corruption that implicates many of the province’s most powerful citizens—including the province’s legendary now-senile premier—as well as its most cherished founding myths.

In Where the Bodies Lie, Mark Lisac (author of Alberta Politics Uncovered and The Klein Revolution) draws upon his decades of experience as a reporter at Alberta’s provincial legislature to craft an absorbing debut novel—part political thriller, part fable—that opens up timeless themes of friendship, love, the inescapability of grief, the weight of history, and the nature of truth.

Documentaries

by Walter Hildebrandt

published by NeWest Press

2016

Poetry | 165

CDN $: 19.95

Taking its inspiration from director Werner Herzog’s concept of “ecstatic truth” and recalling D.W. Griffith’s silent film classic “Intolerance”, poet/historian Walter Hildebrandt’s ambitious new book of poems is a searing denunciation of the exploitation of the poor and powerless at the hands of the wealthy. In forceful, unadorned language, Hildebrandt draws a clear line from historical outrages such as the Dakota Wars of the nineteenth century and the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike to injustices in present-day England, Cuba, and Canada. Documentaries urges readers to confront stories that are hiding in plain sight, but which are in danger of being lost when their truth goes unspoken.

50 Percent of Mountaineering is Uphill

The Life of Canadian Mountain Rescue Pioneer Villi Pfisterer

by Susanna Pfisterer

published by NeWest Press

2016

Biography, Non-Fiction | 279

CDN $: 24.95

Fifty Percent of Mountaineering Is Uphill is the enthralling true story of Jasper, Alberta’s Willi Pfisterer, a legend in the field of mountaineering and safety in the Canadian Rockies. For more than thirty years, Willi was an integral part of Jasper’s alpine landscape, guiding climbers up to the highest peaks and rescuing them from perilous situations.

Originally from Austria, this man of action came to Canada in the 1950s to assail the Rockies and stayed to play a pivotal role in the development of mountain safety programs in Western and Northern Canada. His daughter, Susanna “Susi” Pfisterer, has shaped his stories and lectures as an engaging and educational adventure story that features over 100 archival photographs, including avalanche control in the National Parks, guiding adventures with prime ministers, and highlights from the 1,600 peaks Willi climbed and the over 700 rescues he was involved in. Accompanied by the humorous wisdom of the “Sidehillgouger,” readers will traverse a historical and spectacular terrain.

Food Promotion Consumption and Controversy

How Canadians Communicate VI

by ed. Carlene Elliott

published by AU Press

2016

Communication, Educational | 327

CDN $: 34.95

Food nourishes the body, but our relationship with food extends far beyond our need for survival. Food choices not only express our personal tastes but also communicate a range of beliefs, values, affiliations and aspirations—sometimes to the exclusion of others. In the media sphere, the enormous amount of food-related advice provided by government agencies, advocacy groups, diet books, and so on compete with efforts on the part of the food industry to sell their product and to respond to a consumer-driven desire for convenience. As a result, the topic of food has grown fraught, engendering sometimes acrimonious debates about what we should eat, and why.

By examining topics such as the values embedded in food marketing, the locavore movement, food tourism, dinner parties, food bank donations, the moral panic surrounding obesity, food crises, and fears about food safety, the contributors to this volume paint a rich, and sometimes unsettling portrait of how food is represented, regulated, and consumed in Canada. With chapters from leading scholars such as Ken Albala, Harvey Levenstein, Stephen Kline and Valerie Tarasuk, the volume also includes contributions from “food insiders”—bestselling cookbook author and food editor Elizabeth Baird and veteran restaurant reviewer John Gilchrist. The result is a timely and thought-provoking look at food as a system of communication through which Canadians articulate cultural identity, personal values, and social distinction.

Superhero Universe

Tesseracts Nineteen

by ed. Claude Lalumiere and Mark Shainblum

published by EDGE Publishing

2016

Science Fiction, Superhero | 288

CDN $: 15.95

Not a hoax! Not an imaginary story!

Twenty-four short stories and one poem featuring:

Superheroes! Supervillains! Superpowered antiheroes. Mad scientists. Adventurers into the unknown. Detectives of the dark night. Costumed crimefighters. Steampunk armoured avengers. Brave and bold supergroups. Crusading aliens in a strange land. Secret histories. Pulp action.

Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) features all of these permutations of the superhero genre and many others besides!

Europa Journal

by Jack Castle

published by EDGE Publishing

2016

Science Fiction | 288

CDN $: 19.95

On 5 December 1945, five TBM Avenger bombers embarked on a training mission off the coast of Florida and mysteriously vanish without a trace in the Bermuda Triangle.

A PBY search and rescue plane with thirteen crewmen aboard sets out to find the Avengers . . . and never returns.

In 2168, a mysterious five-sided pyramid is discovered on the ocean floor of Jupiter’s icy moon, Europa.

Commander Mac O’Bryant and her team of astronauts are among the first to enter the pyramid’s central chamber. They find the body of a missing World War II pilot, whose hands clutch a journal detailing what happened to him after he and his crew were abducted by aliens and taken to a place with no recognizable stars. As the pyramid walls begin to collapse around Mac and her team, their names mysteriously appear within its pages and they find themselves lost on an alien world.

Stranded with no way home, Mac decides to retrace the pilot’s steps. She never expects to find the man alive. And if the man has yet to die, what does that mean for her and the rest of her crew?

Native Plants for the Short Season Yard

Best Picks for the Chinook and Canadian Prairie Zones

by Lyndon Penner

published by Brush Education Inc.

2016

Gardening | 256

CDN $: 24.95

This is the definitive guide to gardening with native plants on the prairies. Gardening with native plants has lots of advantages, not only for your yard, but also for the ecosystem. What could be better than a beautiful, low-maintenance yard that preserves biodiversity and withstands the prairie climate? Native Plants for the Short Season Yard is the key for western Canadian gardeners wanting to unlock the full potential of native plants.

With the wit and wisdom his fans love, Lyndon shares the basics of shopping for, propagating, and designing with native plants. He also shines a light on more than 100 of his favourite native plants, along with tips on how to grow them. Topics include:

How to ethically and responsibly grow native plants from seeds and cuttings.
Identifying the best plants for sunny, shady, wet, or dry spots in your yard.
The plants best left to wild spaces and those you should avoid at all costs.
Advice from gardening experts who share their secrets and successes with native plants.
Protecting your garden with natural alternatives to herbicides and pesticides.
– See more at: http://www.brusheducation.ca/books/native-plants-for-the-short-season-yard#sthash.2p2nRBqh.dpuf

Sleeping in Tall Grass

by Richard Therrien

published by U of A Press

2016

Poetry | 104

CDN $: 19.95

A cycle of poems, Sleeping in Tall Grass takes an unsparing look at a painful, sometimes abusive, yet strangely redemptive family story enfolded within the body of the Canadian prairie itself—at once physical, historical, and metaphysical. These intensely personal poems reflect the complex relationships between sound and space, language and silence. Treating time as more layered than sequential, they reflect a process of organic composition distilled from Therrien’s iterative observations and utterances. This is writing that reaches “into the very grain of existence”—a sonorous re-presentation of the human presence on the dispassionate but eternally giving plains.

Who Needs Books?

Reading in the Digital Age

by Lynn Coady

published by U of A Press

2016

Non-Fiction | 72

CDN $: 10.95

“We look around and feel as if book culture as we know it is crumbling to dust, but there’s one important thing to keep in mind: as we know it.”

What happens if we separate the idea of “the book” from the experience it has traditionally provided? Lynn Coady challenges booklovers addicted to the physical book to confront their darkest fears about the digital world and the future of reading. Is the all-pervasive internet turning readers into web-surfing automatons and books themselves into museum pieces? The bogeyman of technological change has haunted humans ever since Plato warned about the dangers of the written word, and every generation is convinced its youth will bring about the end of civilization. In Who Needs Books?, Coady suggests that, even though digital advances have long been associated with the erosion of literacy, recent technologies have not debased our culture as much as they have simply changed the way we read.

One Child Reading

My Auto-Bibliography

by Margaret Mackey

published by U of A Press

2016

Literacy, Non-Fiction | 584

CDN $: 60.95

“The miracle of the preserved word, in whatever medium—print, audio text, video recording, digital exchange—means that it may transfer into new times and new places.” —From the Introduction

Margaret Mackey draws together memory, textual criticism, social analysis, and reading theory in an extraordinary act of self-study. In One Child Reading, she makes a singular contribution to our understanding of reading and literacy development. Seeking a deeper sense of what happens when we read, Mackey revisited the texts she read, viewed, listened to, and wrote as she became literate in the 1950s and 1960s in St. John’s, Newfoundland. This tremendous sweep of reading included school texts, knitting patterns, musical scores, and games, as well as hundreds of books. The result is not a memoir, but rather a deftly theorized exploration of how a reader is constructed. One Child Reading is an essential book for librarians, classroom teachers, those involved in literacy development in both scholarly and practical ways, and all serious readers.

Sustainability Planning and Collaboration in Rural Canada

taking the next steps

by ed. Lars Hallstrom, Mary Beckie, Glen Hvenegaard and Karsten Mundel

published by U of A Press

2016

Environmental | 408

CDN $: 49.95

Rural communities, often the first indicators of economic downturns, play an important role in planning for development and sustainability. Increasingly, these communities are compelled to reimagine the paths that lead not only to economic success, but also to the cultural, social, environmental, and institutional pillars of sustainability. As the contributors to this volume demonstrate, there are many examples of such innovation and creativity, and many communities that seek out new ways to build the collaboration, capacity, and autonomy necessary to survive and flourish.

The Home Place

Essays on Robert Krotesch's Poetry

by Dennis Cooley

published by U of A Press

2016

Poetry, Scholarly | 376

CDN $: 49.95

“He wants to sit and visit at the kitchen table, and he can hardly wait to get on the road again.” —From Chapter 1

Robert Kroetsch, one of Canada’s most important writers, was a fierce regionalist with a porous yet resilient sense of “home.” Although his criticism and fiction have received extensive attention, his poetry remains underexplored. This exuberantly polyvocal text, insightfully written by dennis cooley—who knew Kroetsch and worked with him for decades—seeks to correct that imbalance. The Home Place offers a dazzling, playful, and intellectually complex conversation drawing together personal recollections, Kroetsch’s archival materials, and the international body of Kroetsch scholarship. For literary scholars and anyone who appreciates Canadian literature, The Home Place will represent the standard critical evaluation of Kroetsch’s poetry for years to come

The Seven Oaks Reader

by Myrna Kostash

published by NeWest Press

2016

Canadian History, History | 232

CDN $: 26.95

The long rivalry between the Hudson’s Bay Company and the North West Company for control of the fur trade in Canada’s northwest came to an explosive climax on June 19th, 1816, at the so-called Battle of Seven Oaks. Armed buffalo hunters – Indigenous allies of the Nor-Westers – confronted armed colonists of the HBC’s Selkirk settlement near the forks of the Assiniboine and Red Rivers in today’s Winnipeg. This “battle” would prove to be a formative event for Métis self-determination as well as laying down a legacy for settlers to come. The Seven Oaks Reader, forworded by Heather Devine, offers a comprehensive retelling of one of Canada’s most interesting historical periods, the Fur Trade Wars. As in the companion volume, The Frog Lake Reader, Kostash incorporates period accounts and journals, histories, memoirs, songs and fictional retellings, from a wide range of sources, offering readers an engaging and exciting way back into still-controversial historical events.

Spiders of Western Canada

by John Hancock and Kathleen Hancock

published by Lone Pine Publishing

2016

Nature | 192

CDN $: 24.95

The world of spiders of western Canada is not just restricted to the creepy crawlers you see buried in the petals of your rose bush or climbing up the water pipe. Some spiders spin webs; others employ other methods to capture prey. Some spiders are microscopically small; others are big and hairy. Most spiders here do not cause any harm to humans, but some people find them frightening. Not so John and Kathleen Hancock. They have spent their lives studying these creatures. Now living near Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, they have put together descriptions of these creatures and their habitats and habits, drawings and photos of the spiders of western Canada.

Reading Alice Munro 1973-2013

by Robert Thacker

published by University of Calgary

2016

Academic, literature | 310

CDN $: 34.95

In Reading Alice Munro, 1973-2013, the world’s leading Munro scholar offers a critical overview of Alice Munro and her writing spanning forty years. Beginning with a newly written overarching introduction, featuring directive interleaved commentaries addressing chronology and contexts, ending with encompassing afterword, this collection provides a selection of essays and reviews that reflect their times and tell the story of Munro’s emergence and recognition as an internationally acclaimed writer since the 1970s. Acknowledging her beginnings and her persistence as a writer of increasingly exceptional short stories, and just short stories, it treats her career through Thacker’s criticism up to her fourteenth collection, Dear Life (2012), and to the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. Altogether, this book encompasses the whole trajectory of Munro’s critical presence while offering a singularly informed retrospective perspective.

Canadian Countercultures and the Environment

by ed. Colin Coates

published by University of Calgary Press

2016

Academic, Environmental | 302

CDN $: 34.95

Studies of the radical environmental politics of the 1960s have tended to downplay the extent to which much of that countercultural intellectual and social ferment continued into the 1970s and 1980s. Canadian Countercultures and the Environment adds to our knowledge of this understudied period. This collection contributes a sustained analysis of the beginning of major environmental debates in this era and examines a range of issues related to broad environmental concerns, topics which emerged as key concerns in the context of Cold War military investments and experiments, the oil crisis of the 1970s, debates over gendered roles, and the increasing attention to urban pollution and pesticide use.

No other publication dealing with this period covers the wide range of environmental topics (among others, activism, midwifery, organic farming, recycling, urban cycling, and communal living) or geographic locales, from Yukon to Atlantic Canada. Together, they demonstrate how this period influenced and informed environmental action and issues in ways that have had a long-term impact on Canadian society.

The Digital Nexus

Identity, Agency and Political Engagement

by ed. Raphael Foshay

published by AU Press

2016

Academic | 342

CDN $: 34.95

Over half a century ago, in The Gutenberg Galaxy (1962), Marshall McLuhan noted that the overlap of traditional print and new electronic media like radio and television produced widespread upheaval in personal and public life:

Even without collision, such co-existence of technologies and awareness brings trauma and tension to every living person. Our most ordinary and conventional attitudes seem suddenly twisted into gargoyles and grotesques. Familiar institutions and associations seem at times menacing and malignant. These multiple transformations, which are the normal consequence of introducing new media into any society whatever, need special study.
The trauma and tension in the daily lives of citizens as described here by McLuhan was only intensified by the arrival of digital media and the Web in the following decades. The rapidly evolving digital realm held a powerful promise for creative and constructive good—a promise so alluring that much of the inquiry into this new environment focused on its potential rather than its profound impact on every sphere of civic, commercial, and private life. The totalizing scope of the combined effects of computerization and the worldwide network are the subject of the essays in The Digital Nexus, a volume that responds to McLuhan’s request for a “special study” of the tsunami-like transformation of the communication landscape.

League of the Star

by N. R. Cruse

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2016

Fiction | 450

CDN $: 19.99

It is the dawn of the French revolution when masses of hungry peasants burn the chateaux of aristocrats throughout France. After the death of his estranged family, an 18 year-old nobleman, the Marquis Marcel de la Croix, is forced to raise the royalist banner, despite his own revolutionary leanings. The wreck of his family fortress becomes a bastion for newly disenfranchised aristocrats, and Marcel and his fiery associate, Pierre Lafont, lead a rebel group called the League of the Star.

After a bitter falling out with Lafont, Marcel escapes to England incognito, hoping to put the past behind him. In England he encounters several French emigres: the large, brutish former soldier, M. Tolouse, the haughty Mlle. de Courteline, and the sheltered Mlle. Vallon. As these traveling exiles are forced together, a young boy in their company begins to intrigue them with a mysterious tale of love. Can a simple love story, begun merely to entertain the weary travellers, hold the key to Marcel’s fate?

Mary Green

by Melanie Kerr

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2016

Fiction | 318

CDN $: 19.95

Mary Green, obscure orphan and ward of the wealthy Hargreaves family, has always accepted her inferior position with grace, humility, and gratitude. When she discovers that her only friend is to leave the country forever, that her confidence has been betrayed by the unfeeling youngest daughter of the family, and that her very deprivation is the object of the mockery and scorn of everyone she has sought to honour, she determines to cast them off and make her own way in the world. On her twenty-first birthday, free to choose her own destiny, she dreams of peace and tolerance, and perhaps a partner who might be noble enough to love her in all her simplicity. But when an unexpected foray into London society disrupts all her plans, she is faced with an uncharacteristic storm of feelings. Will she grow strong and happy in her independence, or will her character be lost amidst her newfound ambition? Unable to trust the whims of her own heart, Mary is forced to confront the question that has forever plagued her: Who is she and where does she come from?

Course Correction

by Douglas Morrison

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2016

Fiction | 332

CDN $: 19.95

After his plane to Greece is hijacked, Canadian Michael Barrett finds himself in Ukraine on the run from the Mafia, in the company of his mysterious Ukrainian seat-mate, Dmitri. As Michael and Dmitri try to stay ahead of the pursuing Mafia, Michael struggles to figure out who to trust. In a country where bribery is rampant, and authorities are suspect, his only resource is the morose Dmitri, who is hiding his share of secrets. As the two fugitives race through the Ukrainian countryside in a desperate attempt to reach the border, catastrophe strikes, testing the tentative bond between them, and jeopardizing their hope of survival.

Edge of Wild

by D. K. Stone

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2016

Fiction | 332

CDN $: 19.95

Transplanted from New York City to the tiny mountain town of Waterton, Alberta with the task of saving a floundering new hotel, Rich Evans is desperate to return to the city as soon as he can. The locals seem unusually hostile towards his efforts, or maybe even menacing, and was that a cougar on his door-step last night? As Rich begins to wonder whether his predecessor disappeared of his own accord, he finds himself strongly drawn to Louise Newman, the garage mechanic who is fixing his suddenly unreliable BMW, and the only person in Waterton who doesn’t seem desperate to run him out of town. As Rich works on the hotel, the town is torn apart by a series of gruesome, unsolved murders. With Louise as his only ally in a town that seems set against him, Rich can’t help but wonder: will he be the next victim?

Kalyna

by Pam Clark

published by Stonehouse Publishing

2016

Fiction | 292

CDN $: 19.95

Swept up in a whirlwind courtship, Katja and Wasyl begin life anew in a Ukrainian settlement of Western Canada. The dusty Canadian prairies promise hope and independence, but when war breaks out between the old world and the new, their newfound stability is shattered. Rumours of the internment of Ukrainian-Canadians haunt the new settlers. Would the country they love betray them like this? An incident throws the couple and their young children into turmoil, and Katja faces the prospect of enduring a Canadian winter without Wasyl by her side. The close community of Edna-Star bands together during this trying time, but the help of the suave Dr. Smith holds it’s own danger. Is the family strong enough to weather the storm that they are up against?

Baffin Island

Field Research and High Arctic Adventue 1961-1967

by Jack D Ives

published by University of Calgary Press

2016

Academic, Environmental | 235

CDN $: 34.95

A geographer with extensive research experience in the Canadian North, Jack D. Ives has written a lively and informative account of several expeditions to Baffin Island during the “golden age” of federal research. In the 1960s, scientists from the Geographical Branch of Canada’s Department of Energy, Mines, and Resources travelled to Baffin to study glacial geomorphology and glaciology. Their fieldwork resulted in vastly increased knowledge of the Far North-from its ice caps and glaciers to its lichens and microfossils. Drawing from the recollections of his Baffin colleagues as well as from his own memories, Ives takes readers on a remarkable adventure, describing the day-to-day experiences of the field teams in the context of both contemporary Arctic research and bureaucratic decision making. Along the way, his narrative illustrates the role played by the Cold War-era Distant Early Warning Line and other northern infrastructure, the crucial importance of his pioneering aerial photography, the unpredictable nature of planes, helicopters, and radios in Arctic regions, and of course, the vast and breathtaking scenery of the North.

Stranger Among Us

Tales of the Underdogs and Outcasts

by Ed. Susan Forest and Lucas Law

published by Laska Media Groups

2016

Anthology, Mental Health, Speculative | 360

CDN $: 19.95

Strangers Among Us: Tales of the Underdogs and Outcasts explores the delicate balance between mental health and mental illness through short speculative fiction by nineteen authors and an Introduction by Julie E. Czerneda.

Apartheid in Palestine

Hard Laws and Harder Experiences

by Ghada Ageel Editor

published by U of A Press

2016

History, Political Science | 260

CDN $: 59.95

“Of all the crimes to which Palestinians have been subjected through a century of bitter tragedy, perhaps none are more cruel than the silencing of their voices. The suffering has been most extreme, criminal, and grotesque in Gaza, where Ghada Ageel was one of the victims from childhood. This collection of essays is a poignant cry for justice, far too long delayed.” —Noam Chomsky

There are more than two sides to the conflict between Palestine and Israel. There are millions. Millions of lives, voices, and stories behind the enduring struggle in Israel and Palestine. Yet, the easy binary of Palestine vs. Israel on which the media so often relies for context effectively silences the lived experiences of people affected by the strife. Ghada Ageel sought leading experts—Palestinian and Israeli, academic and activist—to gather stories that humanize the historic processes of occupation, displacement, colonization, and, most controversially, apartheid. Historians, scholars and students of colonialism and Israel-Palestine studies, and anyone interested in more nuanced debate, will want to read this book.

Gendered Militarism in Canada

Learning Conformity and Resistance

by Nancy Taber, Editor

published by U of A Press

2016

Gender Studies | 246

CDN $: 34.95

“Despite Canada’s claim to be a gender equitable nation, militarism continues to function in ways that protect inequality.” —from the Introduction

Little has been done to examine, critique, and challenge the ways ingrained societal ideas of militarism and gender influence lifelong learning patterns and practices of Canadians. Editor Nancy Taber and ten other contributors explore reasons why Canadian educators should be concerned with how learning, militarism, and gender intersect. Readers may be surprised to discover how this reaches beyond the classroom into the everyday lessons, attitudes, and habits that all Canadians are taught, often without question. Pushing the boundaries of education theory, research, and practice, this book will be of particular interest to feminist, adult, and teacher educators and to scholars and students of education, the military, and women’s and gender studies.

A Canterbury Pilgrimage / An Italian Pilgrimage

by Elizabeth Robins Pennell, Joseph Pennell and Dave Buchanan

published by U of A Press

2016

Memoir, Travel | 150

CDN $: 29.95

A peasant in peaked hat and blue shirt, with trousers rolled up high above his bare knees, crossed the road and silently examined the tricycle. “You have a good horse,” he then said; “it eats nothing.” —from An Italian Pilgrimage

The 1880s was an exhilarating time for cycling pioneers like Elizabeth and her husband Joseph. As boneshakers and high-wheelers evolved into tandem tricycles and the safety bike, cycling grew from child’s play and extreme sport into a leisurely and, importantly, literary mode of transportation. The illustrated travel memoirs of “those Pennells” were—and still are—highly entertaining. They helped usher in the new age of leisure touring, while playfully hearkening back to famous literary journeys. In this new edition, Dave Buchanan provides rich cultural contexts surrounding the Pennells’ first two adventures. These long out-of-print travel memoirs will delight avid cyclists as well as scholars of travel literature, cycling history, women’s writing, Victorian literature, and illustration.

100 Days

by Juliane Okot Bitek and Cecily Nicholson

published by U of A Press

2016

Genocide, Poetry | 111

CDN $: 19.95

100 days… 100 days that should not have been… 100 days the world could have stopped. But did not.

For 100 days, Juliane Okot Bitek recorded the lingering nightmare of the Rwandan genocide in a poem—each poem recalling the senseless loss of life and of innocence. Okot Bitek draws on her own family’s experience of displacement under the regime of Idi Amin, pulling in fragments of the poetic traditions she encounters along the way: the Ugandan Acholi oral tradition of her father—the poet Okot p’Bitek; Anglican hymns; the rhythms and sounds of the African American Spiritual tradition; and the beat of spoken word and hip-hop. 100 Days is a collection of poetry that will stop you in your tracks.

Unsustainable Oil

Facts, Counterfacts and Fictions

by Jon Gordon

published by U of A Press

2016

Literary Criticism, Oil and Oilsands | 234

CDN $: 45.00

“Sustainable development is, for government and industry at least, primarily a way of turning trees into lumber, tar into oil, and critique into consent; a way to defend the status quo of growth at any cost.” —from the Introduction

In Unsustainable Oil: Facts, Counterfacts and Fictions, Jon Gordon makes the case for re-evaluating the theoretical, political, and environmental issues around petroleum extraction. Doing so, he argues, will reinvigorate our understanding of the culture and the ethics of energy production in Canada.

Rather than looking for better facts or better interpretations of the facts, Gordon challenges us to embrace the future after oil. Reading fiction can help us understand the cultural-ecological crisis that we inhabit. In Unsustainable Oil, using the lens of Alberta’s bituminous sands, he asks us to consider literature’s potential to open space for creative alternatives.

Scaling Up

The Convergence of Social Economy and Sustainability

by Edited by Mike Gismondi, Sean Connelly, Mary Beckie, Sean Markey and Mark Roseland

published by AU Press

2016

Environment, Non-Fiction | 300

CDN $: 34.95

When citizens take collaborative action to meet the needs of their community, they are participating in the social economy. Co-operatives, community-based social services, local non-profit organizations, and charitable foundations are all examples of social economies that emphasize mutual benefit rather than the accumulation of profit. While such groups often participate in market-based activities to achieve their goals, they also pose an alternative to the capitalist market economy. Contributors to Scaling Up investigated innovative social economies in British Columbia and Alberta and discovered that achieving a social good through collective, grassroots enterprise resulted in a sustainable way of satisfying human needs that was also, by extension, environmentally responsible. As these case studies illustrate, organizations that are capable of harnessing the power of a social economy generally demonstrate a commitment to three outcomes: greater social justice, financial self-sufficiency, and environmental sustainability. Within the matrix of these three allied principles lie new strategic directions for the politics of sustainability.

The Canadian Cowboy Cookbook

From the Ranch to the Backyard

by Duane Radford, Jean Pare, Gregory Lepine

published by Argenta Press

2015

Cookbook | 160

CDN $: 19.99

The iconic image of the dusty cowboy astride his horse, crooning to his herd, has captured people’s imagination for well over a century. The heyday of the true cowboy may have ended long ago, but our fascination with that way of life lives on. Argenta’s latest book, The Cowboy Cookbook,is a tip of the hat to all things cowboy, including archival photos and historical information interspersed with recipes to provide an intimate glimpse into lifeas it was on the range. Cowboy aficionados can now rustle up chow that would do even the crankiest chuckwagon cook proud and draw even the most rugged cowboy into thebuffet line. Some recipes are authentic cowboy fare, while others have a contemporary twist. The result is delicious food steeped in a romantic nostalgia of a bygone age recreated for a modern audience: • the pancake breakfast complete with flapjacks, sausages, scrambled eggs and coffee • cornbread biscuits, Johnny cake and hard tack • buckaroo burgers, hamburger hash and shepherd’s pie • chuckwagon stew, baked beans and prairie oysters • Saskatoon cobbler, burnt sugar rolls and matrimonial cake.

The Cowboy Legend

Owen Wister's Virginian and the Canadian-American Frontier

by John Jennings

published by University of Calgary Press

2015

Biography, History | 412

CDN $: 39.95

The cowboy, as perhaps no other figure, has captured the imagination of North Americans for over a century. Before Owen Wister’s publication of The Virginian in 1902, the image of the cowboy was essentially that of the dime novel – a rough, violent, one-dimensional drifter, or the stage cowboy variety found in Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West show. Wister’s novel was to transform, almost overnight, this image of the cowboy. Soon after its publication, Wister sent a copy, inscribed “To the hero from the author,” to Everett Johnson, a cowboy from Virginia who had been a friend of Wister’s in Wyoming in the 1880s. Johnson had migrated to Alberta by the 1890s, eventually settling in the Calgary area. Before his death in 1946, his daughter-in-law, Jean Johnson, transcribed Everett’s stories of the old west and collected them into a manuscript, now on deposit in the Glenbow Archives.

In The Cowboy Legend, John Jennings, building on Jean Johnson’s work, details the evidence that Everett Johnson was the initial and prime inspiration for Wister’s cowboy, and in the process shows that Johnson led a fascinating life in his own right. His memories of both the Wyoming and Alberta cattle frontiers provide insight into ranch life on both sides of the border, and the compelling parallel biographies of Johnson and Wister feature vignettes of legendary period figures such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Wild Bill Hickok, Wyatt Earp, and Butch Cassidy, not to mention the best man at Johnson’s wedding, Henry Longabaugh, a.k.a. the Sundance Kid.

Mining and Communities in Northern Canada

History, Politics and Memory

by ed. Arn Keeling and John Sandlos

published by University of Calgary Press

2015

History, Indigenous | 440

CDN $: 34.95

For indigenous communities throughout the globe, mining has been a historical forerunner of colonialism, introducing new, and often disruptive, settlement patterns and economic arrangements. Although indigenous communities may benefit from and adapt to the wage labour and training opportunities provided by new mining operations, they are also often left to navigate the complicated process of remediating the long-term ecological changes associated with industrial mining. In this regard, the mining often inscribes colonialism as a broad set of physical and ecological changes to indigenous lands.

This collection examines historical and contemporary social, economic, and environmental impacts of mining on Aboriginal communities in northern Canada. Combining oral history research with intensive archival study, this work juxtaposes the perspectives of government and industry with the perspectives of local communities. The oral history and ethnographic material provides an extremely significant record of local Aboriginal perspectives on histories of mining and development in their regions.

Speaking Power to Truth

Digital Discourse and the Public Intellectual

by ed. Michael Keren and Richard Hawkings

published by AU Press

2015

Communications, Non-Fiction | 205

CDN $: 24.95

Online discourse has created a new media environment for contributions to public life, one that challenges the social significance of the role of public intellectuals—intellectuals who, whether by choice or by circumstance, offer commentary on issues of the day. The value of such commentary is rooted in the assumption that, by virtue of their training and experience, intellectuals possess knowledge—that they understand what constitutes knowledge with respect to a particular topic, are able to distinguish it from mere opinion, and are in a position to define its relevance in different contexts. When intellectuals comment on matters of public concern, they are accordingly presumed to speak truth, whether they are writing books or op-ed columns or appearing as guests on radio and television news programs. At the same time, with increasing frequency, discourse on public life is taking place online. This new digital environment is characterized by abundance—an abundance of speakers, discussion, and access. But has this abundance of discourse—this democratization of knowledge, as some describe it—brought with it a corresponding increase in truth?

Underworld

by Story by Lovern Kindzierski and Artwork by GMB Chomichuk

published by Renegade Arts Entertainment

2015

Graphic Novel |

CDN $: 24.95

Loosely based on Homer’s classic story, The Odyssey, this graphic novel follows Hector as he tries to regain his sanity whilst navigating his way through the criminal underworld on the streets of Winnipeg. As he puts the pieces of his life back together, Hector rediscovers his wife and children, forgotten through his madness. Hector battles to save himself so he can make amends with his family, the chance of redemption tantalizing amongst the inner war in his mind and the physical danger he finds himself part of too.

Shame

Conception

by Lovern Kindzierski and John Bolton

published by Renegade Arts Entertainment

2015

Graphic Novel |

CDN $: 9.99

Book 1 in the trilogy introduces a world much like our own but with magick and those with the power to control it, for good and for evil. In this first tale we meet Shame, discover the unique circumstances of her creation, and follow her choices as her true nature is revealed.

Department of Monsterology

Sabaticals

by Rennie Holden and Denton Campbell

published by Renegade Arts Entertainment

2015

Graphic Novel |

CDN $: 19.99

The second trade paperback in this highly praised comic book series is here.

‘Investigating the forgotten corners of our world, one monster at a time.’

Gordon Rennie, PJ Holden, Steven Denton and Jim Campbell return to campus with the next instalment of cryptozoological adventure. Sabbaticals picks up after the events of Monsterology 101, with several team members pursuing their own agendas following their near miss with apocalyptic catastrophe in China and the South Pacific.

The Lamont Institute may have stumbled, but it takes more than death to stop their plans, and now they are aware of Samwi’s potential, she has become their quarry. Professor Tovar’s parasitic secret is leading him into the deep darkness, far from his colleagues, towards a fate that may have consequences far beyond ridding himself of his personal burden.

The Teacher and the Superintendent

Native Schooling in the Alaskan Interior 1904-1918

by ed. George Boulter and Barbara Grigor Taylor

published by AU Press

2015

Education, History, Non-Fiction | 394

CDN $: 39.95

From its inception in 1885, the Alaska School Service was charged with the assimilation of Alaskan Native children into mainstream American values and ways of life. Working in the missions and schools along the Yukon River were George E. Boulter and Alice Green, his future wife. Boulter, a Londoner originally drawn to the Klondike, had begun teaching in 1905 and by 1910 had been promoted to superintendent of schools for the Upper Yukon District. In 1907, Green left a comfortable family life in New Orleans to answer the “call to serve” in the Episcopal mission boarding schools for Native children at Anvik and Nenana, where she occupied the position of government teacher. As school superintendent, Boulter wrote frequently to his superiors in Seattle and Washington, DC, to discuss numerous administrative matters and to report on problems and conditions overall.

Whose Man in Havana

Adventures from the Far Side of Diplomacy

by John Graham

published by University of Calgary Press

2015

Memoir, Non-Fiction | 305

CDN $: 34.95

In Whose Man in Havana? John Graham provides us with a direct look at international relations through his experience as a practitioner who, as he puts it, has been fortunate in his career within the Canadian foreign service and international organizations to be ‘in the right place at the right time’. The stuff of novels, he never would have dreamed that his apprenticeship would have him stationed in Cuba spying for the CIA on Soviet military operations. Subsequent assignments proved to be as unexpectedly and bizarrely entertaining. Throughout the book, he has focused on the lighter side of people and places, but almost everywhere the dark side intrudes, particularly the man-made dark side, providing quite a bit of black comedy. He notes that diplomacy at its most effective is neither dry nor humourless. The book is focused mainly on Latin America and the Caribbean, but other chapters range across Bosnia, the UK, Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan, Palestine, and Crete.

Two Minds

by Harold Rhenisch

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2015

Poetry | 108

CDN $: 15.95

Two Minds is a collection of ghazals, the persian song form transformed into a meditative practice in playful alternative logics by John Thompson, Phyllis Webb and Robert Bly. Each of these poems not only is of two minds about the state of the world, but actually has two minds, one of which Harold gives away to his readers in each poem, and one which holds it up like a mask. Each poem, formed of a different vortex of history, society, philosophy, art, the sea and the earth, is a different mind. Harold worked on many of these poems for over thirty years. Through many incarnations, they have been purified to joy, freshness and wonder. Two Minds is about the world making minds and giving them to its readers, poem by poem by poem.

ClockWork

poems and essays

by Zaid Shlah

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2015

Poetry | 114

CDN $: 15.95

ClockWork is a sustained argument with the role of the poet/critic, and the search for an alternative narrative. It has been situated with the eye of an exile; that is, Zaid Shlah perceives his native country (Canada) at a distance, and that distance provides an oblique and nuanced view of its poetic/poltical and public discourse. As an Iraqi-Canadian living in the U.S. (bringing with it all of the conflicted feelings of a protracted and senseless war), the manuscript’s primary exploration is concerned with the effects of that compounded discourse on language and poetry, and what the author or the individual might do to get back to seeing himself and the world anew.

Niche

by Basma Kavanagh

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2015

Poetry | 118

CDN $: 15.95

“Basma Kavanagh’s spritely genius is both fierce and delicate, biologically exact and artistically complex. This is work of wide scope: deep, informed mourning for what humans have done to the earth, and equally deep, equally informed hope for what might survive us.” —Jan Zwicky

Compelled by loss of knowledge, species, habitat and traditions, my intention with this collection is to elucidate the endurance of what is no longer physically apparent. Extinctions and an exploration of the Red List (the endangered species list for Nova Scotia) are important to this work. The poems grapple with human culpability, but also ask: What will happen as human relationships with non-human animals and other living things diminish? What will happen if we become extinct? These larger questions about our future in a changing climate are inextricably linked to specific inquiries into what we have lost by reducing certain habitats, hunting particular species to the brink of extinction, and abandoning place-specific traditions and practices. Our sadness surrounding extinction seems to confirm E. O. Wilson’s Biophilia (life-loving) hypothesis, our basic need for other life; however, a uniquely human self-loathing distances us from the very life-affirming and life-giving connections that we require. How do we move beyond despair? What happens after extinction? What is regained through the revival of traditions, the restoration of habitats, re-introductions of species? Is this a moment to be both patient and visionary, to see beyond destruction to whatever natural renewal will occur without more intervention, or should we cautiously explore the “re-animations” and “de-extinctions” proposed by the scientific community?

Changelings

by Cassy Welburn

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2015

Poetry | 86

CDN $: 15.95

“Cassy Welburn writes with insight and revelation, as she examines the nuances of personal story, transformation and healing. Her poetic narratives integrate strong images with lamenting vignettes. Welburn presents her reader with rich portraits of people and landscape, through a tight lens and then again through the optic of a hermetic breath.” – Sheri-D Wilson

CASSY WELBURN’S collection of poetry, Changelings, is a look at the small but powerful acts of our lives that have the power to transform us and the magic of story to illuminate them. The voice of the wyrd speaks through the natural world at moments of crisis in these scenes from the lives of children, men and women on the verge of becoming something else.

Alberta Oil and the Decline of Democracy in Canada

by ed. Meenal Shrivastava and Lorna Stefanick

published by AU Press

2015

Alberta, Non-Fiction, Politics | 426

CDN $: 37.95

Prior to May 2015, the oil-rich jurisdiction of Alberta had, for over four decades, been a one-party state. During that time, the rule of the Progressive Conservatives essentially went unchallenged, with critiques of government policy falling on deaf ears and Alberta ranking behind other provinces in voter turnout. Given the province’s economic reliance on oil revenues, a symbiotic relationship also developed between government and the oil industry. Cross-national studies have detected a correlation between oil-dependent economies and authoritarian rule, a pattern particularly evident in Africa and the Middle East. Alberta Oil and the Decline of Democracy in Canada sets out to test the “oil inhibits democracy” hypothesis in the context of an industrialized nation in the Global North.

Idioms of Sami Health and Healing

by ed. Barbara Helen Miller

published by U of A Press

2015

Health, Indigenous | 220

CDN $: 34.95

The Sámi—indigenous people of northernmost Europe—have relied on traditional healing methods over generations. This pioneering volume documents, in accessible language, local healing traditions and demonstrates the effectiveness of using the resources local communities can provide. This collection of essays by ten experts also records how ancient healing traditions and modern health-care systems have worked together, and sometimes competed, to provide solutions for local problems. Idioms of Sámi Health and Healing is one of the first English-language studies of the traditional healing methods among the Sámi, and offers valuable insight and academic context to those in the fields of anthropology, medical anthropology, transcultural psychiatry, and circumpolar studies. Idioms of Sámi Health and Healing is the second volume in the Patterns of Northern Traditional Healing series.

Grant Notley

The Social Conscience of Alberta

by Howard Leeson

published by U of A Press

2015

Alberta, Biography, Politics | 350

CDN $: 29.95

This book is a biography of my dad’s political life. However, it is also a primer for would-be politicians. Its most salient message? Political victory worth having rarely comes easy.

– Rachel Notley, from the Foreword

Grant Notley, leader of Alberta’s New Democratic Party from 1968 to 1984, stood out in Alberta politics. His goals, his personal integrity, his obvious dedication to social change, and his “practical idealism” made him the social conscience of Alberta. He bridged the old and the new; he provided the necessary hard work to ensure the continuation of a social democratic party in Alberta. Albertans felt intuitively that he represented a part of their collective being, and his untimely death in 1984 touched them deeply. Leeson’s new introduction recognizes Grant Notley’s significant contribution to the continuity and health of his party while acknowledging the important work of his daughter, Rachel Notley, who led the Alberta NDP to electoral victory in 2015. Readers of politics, biography, and social history will appreciate this new edition of an important book.

Weaving a Malawi Sunrise

A Woman, A School, A People

by Roberta Laurie

published by U of A Press

2015

African, Education, Non-Fiction | 416

CDN $: 39.95

“When you educate a girl, you educate a nation.” —Malawian saying

The women of Malawi, like many other women in developing countries, struggle to find their way out of poverty and build a better life for themselves and their families. Weaving a Malawi Sunrise tells the story of Memory Chazeza’s quest to get an education and to build a school for young women. Roberta Laurie was one of many who helped Memory realize her vision of seeing young girls become strong and independent women who could care for themselves and their future families. During her time in Malawi, Laurie met several other women, each of whom had a story of her own. Laurie combines these personal accounts with detailed information about the country’s underlying social and political context. Readers interested in Africa, global affairs, women’s studies, development, and international education will give high marks to Weaving a Malawi Sunrise.

Cultural Mapping and the Digital Sphere

Place and Space

by Ed. Ruth Panofsky & Kathleen Kellett

published by U of A Press

2015

Communications, Education, Literary | 310

CDN $: 39.95

“Notwithstanding their differing approaches—digital, archival, historical, iterative, critical, creative, reflective—the essays gathered here articulate new ways of seeing, investigating, and apprehending literature and culture.” – From the Preface

This collection of essays enriches digital humanities research by examining various Canadian cultural works and the advances in technologies that facilitate these interdisciplinary collaborations. Fourteen essays—eleven in English and three in French—survey the helix of place and space. Contributors to Part I chart new archival and storytelling methodologies, while those in Part II venture forth to explore specific cultural and literary texts. Cultural Mapping and the Digital Sphere will serve as an indispensable road map for researchers and those interested in the digital humanities, women’s writing, and Canadian culture and literature.

Familiar and Foreign

Identity in Iranian Film and Literature

by Ed. Manijeh Mannani and Veronica Thompson

published by AU Press

2015

Literature. Academic | 264

CDN $: 39.95

Despite the Iranian government’s determined pursuance of anti-Western policies and strict conformity to religious principles, the film and literature of Iran reflect the clash between a nostalgic pride in Persian tradition and an apparent infatuation with a more Eurocentric modernity. In Familiar and Foreign, Mannani and Thompson set out to explore the tensions surrounding the ongoing formulation of Iranian identity by bringing together essays on poetry, novels, memoir, and films. These include both canonical and less widely theorized texts, as well as works of literature written in English by authors living in diaspora.

Challenging neocolonialist stereotypes, these critical excursions into Iranian literature and film reveal the limitations of collective identity as it has been configured within and outside of Iran. Through the examination of works by, among others, the iconic female poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the expatriate author Goli Taraqqi, the controversial memoirist Azar Nafisi, and the graphic novelist Marjane Satrapi, author of Persepolis, this volume engages with the complex and contested discourses of religion, patriarchy, and politics that are the contemporary product of Iran’s long and revolutionary history.

Sharon Pollock

First Woman of Canadian Theatre

by Ed. Donna Coates

published by U of C Press

2015

Biography, Theatre | 326

CDN $: 34.95

As playwright, actor, director, teacher, mentor, theatre administrator, and critic, Sharon Pollock has played an integral role in the shaping of Canada’s national theatre tradition, and she continues to produce new works and to contribute to Canadian theatre as passionately as she has done over the past fifty years. Pollock is nationally and internationally respected for her work and support of the theatre community. She has also played a major role in informing Canadians about the “dark side” of their history and current events. This collection, comprised entirely of new and original assessments of her work and contribution to theatre, is both timely and long overdue.

Supernatural Christmas Ghost Stories

by Barbara Smith

published by Lone Pine Publishing

2015

Fiction, Ghost Stories | 232

CDN $: 14.95

Bestselling author and trusted storyteller Barbara Smith delves into the heartwarming but sometimes sinister stories at that time of year when people may encounter the specters of those who have passed on to the other side: • A distraught young man’s encounter with the spirit of his grandfather just before Christmas leads him to the career of his dreams • Two sailors take refuge in an abandoned house in London’s affluent Berkeley Square on Christmas Eve; by the next morning, one has committed suicide and the other has been driven mad by the house’s ghostly inhabitants • On the day before Christmas Eve in 1998, security cameras in Leicester’s Belgrave Hall capture the image of an elegant woman in Victorian dress; the Grey Lady is only one of several ghosts inhabiting this stately home  And so many more…

Engaging in Action Research

A Practical Guide to Teacher-Conducted Research for Educators and School Leaders

by Jim Parsons, Kurtis Hewson, Lorna Adrian, & Nicole Day

published by Brush Education

2015

Education, Research, Textbook | 149

CDN $: 19.95

You don’t need a tweed jacket to be a researcher—in thousands of schools across North America, practising teachers conduct studies on best practices, alternative approaches, and effective learning strategies. Classroom teachers have experiences and opportunities unavailable to researchers in a university setting, and action research—site-based, teacher-conducted research—can have a valuable impact on the educational community.  Yet many teachers don’t see their work as real research, and many other teachers have great ideas for research projects but don’t know where to begin. For these teachers, Engaging in Action Research demystifies the world of educational research and provides support, guidance, and encouragement.

Epidemiology for Canadian Students

Principles, Methods and Critical Appraisal

by Dr. Scott Patten

published by Brush Education

2015

Education, Medical, Textbook | 290

CDN $: 39.95

Epidemiology for Canadian Students introduces students to the principles and methods of epidemiology and critical appraisal, all grounded within a Canadian context. This context is crucial—epidemiologic research in Canada most often uses data from Canadian registries, Canadian special purpose cohorts, provincial health administrators, national statistical agencies and other sources that will be important to Canadian students during their careers. Dr. Scott Patten draws on more than 20 years’ experience teaching epidemiology to present core concepts in a conversational tone and pragmatic sequence. This introductory textbook is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students, health professionals and trainees. – See more at: http://www.brusheducation.ca/books/epidemiology-for-canadian-students–2#sthash.cPGIDrUD.dpuf

Cultural Competency Skills for Health Professionals

A Workbook for Caring Across Cultures

by Earle Waugh, Olga Szafran, Jean A. C. Triscott, Roger Parent

published by Brush Education

2015

Medical, Textbook | 169

CDN $: 79.95

Cultural Competency Skills for Health Professionals teaches techniques for meeting the challenges of working with culturally diverse patients and their families. The skills that health professionals and students acquire through using this workbook will improve their communication and problem-solving abilities when working across cultures. Cultural Competency Skills for Health Professionals approaches intercultural issues in health care from the perspective of communication. It sharpens your ability to understand the messages and information being communicated by patients and their families.

Psychiatry Review for Canadian Doctors

Key Preparation for your Certification Exams

by Dr. K. Schivakumar

published by Brush Education

2015

Medical, Textbook | 266

CDN $: 59.95

Prepare for the psychiatry certification exams offered by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. With 200 multiple-choice questions and 20 OSCE case scenarios, Psychiatry Review for Canadian Doctors covers all exam main topics and question formats. It’s also current for DSM-5. Unlike most guides on the market, which are adapted from US sources, Psychiatry Review for Canadian Doctors is written exclusively for residents studying for the RCPSC psychiatry exam. It can also be used as a supplementary resource for those studying for exams offered by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK).

Clinical Skills Review

Scenarios Based on Standardized Patients

by Dr. Zu-hua Gao, Dr. Christopher Naugler

published by Brush Education

2015

Medical, Textbook | 284

CDN $: 44.95

When you take your clinical skills exam, every case you know counts. Prepare quickly and efficiently for your clinical exam with the updated third edition of this bestselling OSCE study guide. Written by Canadian doctors, Clinical Skills Review presents 134 cases based on scenarios you’ll encounter on the MCCQE II and CFPC certification exams. An essential resource for Canadian medical students and international medical graduates seeking a licence to practise medicine in Canada, Clinical Skills Review is also a valuable supplemental guide for the USMLE Step 2 CS.

Philosophy of Education

Introductory Readings

by William Hare and John P. Portelli

published by Brush Education

2015

Education, Textbook | 455

CDN $: 39.95

Revised and updated with 25 new essays, the fourth edition of this bestselling collection brings together more than 30 leaders in the field of educational theory. An engaging exploration of the ideas and trends shaping education in today’s classrooms, Philosophy of Education includes topics on high-stakes testing, consumerism in education, and social justice issues in the classroom. How can we teach students moral values while avoiding indoctrination? How should a teacher deal with controversial issues in the classroom? What role should standards play in education, and who develops those standards? And why is the link between theory and practice in the classroom important in the first place? Philosophy of Education provides students, teachers, and administrators with a lively and accessible introduction to the central debates and issues in education today.

Approaches to Aboriginal Education in Canada

Searching for Solutions

by Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard ed.

published by Brush Education

2015

Aboriginal, Education, Textbook | 424

CDN $: 39.95

This timely publication brings diverse perspectives on aboriginal education together in one volume, providing readers a context with which to understand and consider them. These approaches are juxtaposed to encourage critical analysis of the different assumptions underlying proposals for improving aboriginal education. There are two general categories of perspectives explored in the book – parallelist and integrationist approaches. Nine essays are provided as examples of parallelist thinking. They all argue, to varying degrees, that Aboriginal autonomy and control over education, as well as the revitalization of Aboriginal traditions, is necessary for Aboriginal education to be improved.  Integrationist approaches, on the other hand, assume that solutions to Aboriginal problems lie in facilitating native participation in the Canadian educational system and workforce. These approaches, represented by nine articles, are informed by both liberalism and political economy.

Immigrant and Refugee Students in Canada

by Courtney Anne Brewer and Michael McCabe ed.

published by Brush Education

2015

Education, Immigrants, Textbook | 272

CDN $: 34.95

Recent immigrants and refugees — both children and their families — often struggle to adapt to Canadian education systems. For their part, educators also face challenges when developing effective strategies to help these students make smooth transitions to their new country. In Immigrant and Refugee Students in Canada, researchers join educators and social workers to provide a thorough and wide-ranging analysis of the issues at the preschool, elementary, secondary and post-secondary levels. By understanding these issues within the unique Canadian context, educators can work more effectively with newcomers trying to find their way.

Ten Strategies for Building Community With Technology

A Handbook for Instructional Designers and Program Developers

by Bernie Potvin, Nicki Rehn, David Peat

published by Brush Education

2015

Education, Technology, Textbook | 196

CDN $: 29.95

Educators in online and other technology-rich environments consistently ask, “How can I build community among the learners in my class?” They know learning is strengthened by community, but aren’t sure how to design a community in a learning environment where technology plays a significant role. Ten Strategies for Building Community with Technology answers their question with proven strategies developed over the authors’ thirty years’ experience designing and teaching online classes. The ten strategies demonstrate that technology is not an impediment to community, but instead a tool for building more effective learning environments than are possible with traditional, face-to-face classrooms. Used the right way, technology can provide more instructional time, more opportunities for students to reflect, more chances to share and connect, and more access to feedback. But these effective learning environments don’t happen by chance. This book gives you all the background, tactics, examples and advice you need to design successful learning communities with technology.

Gross Pathology Handbook

A Guide to Descriptive Terms

by Christopher Horn and Dr. Christopher Naugler

published by Brush Education

2015

Medical, Textbook | 182

CDN $: 44.95

This highly practical guide helps pathology professionals quickly and accurately describe surgical and autopsy specimens as they perform gross dissection. It’s an indispensable resource for anyone who needs to interpret pathology reports. Gross Pathology Handbook provides a comprehensive list of 166 gross descriptive terms paired with images of gross specimens. Each listing includes a brief commentary describing the gross appearance, the underlying disease process and commonly affected tissues. In Gross Pathology Handbook, Dr. Christopher Naugler and Christopher Horn lay the framework for a standardized method of description, resulting in easier interpretation of reports by clinicians and improved communication among healthcare providers. This edition includes a cross-referenced index and lay-flat binding for easy use in the lab.

Nevermore!

Neo-Gothic Fiction Inspired by the Imagination of Edgar Allan Poe

by Nancy Kilpatrick and Caro Soles, editors

published by Edge

2015

Fiction, Gothic | 259

CDN $: 15.95

nEvermore! Tales of Murder, Mystery and the Macabre is an homage to the great American writer, the incomparable Edgar Allan Poe, and a must-have for every fan of his work.

Compiled by multi-award winning editors, Nancy Kilpatrick and Caro Soles, nEvermore! Tales of Murder, Mystery and the Macabre presents a tantalizing selection of imaginative stories by New York Times bestselling and prize-winning authors.

Featuring works by: Margaret Atwood; Kelley Armstrong; Richard Christian Matheson; Tanith Lee; William F. Nolan (with Jason Brock & Sunni Brock); Nancy Holder; Christopher Rice; Chelsea Quinn Yarbro; Michael Jecks; Lisa Morton; J. Madison Davis; Barbara Fradkin, Colleen Anderson, Robert Bose, Jane Petersen Burfield, Rick Chiantaretto, Robert Lopresti, David McDonald, Loren Rhoads, Thomas S. Roche, and Carol Weekes & Michael Kelly.

This anthology consists of 21 original tales that blend supernatural and mystery elements in unique reimaginings of Edgar Allan Poe’s exquisite stories.

Professor Challenger

New Worlds, Lost Places

by J. R. Campbell and Charles Prepolec, editors

published by Edge

2015

Fantasy, Fiction, Historical | 250

CDN $: 15.95

Brilliant, belligerent and bearded in equal measure, incapable of suffering fools, or journalists, gladly, the greatest scientific mind of his generation – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Professor George Edward Challenger returns in ten all-new tales of scientific adventure and wonder. He is the discoverer of The Lost World, the prophet of The Poison Belt, the destroyer of The Disintegration Machine, and the man who made the World Scream! Who can deliver mankind from the shackles of ignorance? Who else but that great self-proclaimed champion of science? We give you, ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages, the one, the only, Professor George Edward Challenger!

The Little Third Reich on Lake Superior

A History of Canadian Internment Camp R

by Michel S. Beaulieu and David R. Ratz, Ed.

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Canadian History, History | 345

CDN $: 29.95

For eighteen months during the Second World War, the Canadian military interned 1,145 prisoners of war in Red Rock, Ontario (about 100 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay). Camp R interned friend and foe alike: Nazis, anti-Nazis, Jews, soldiers, merchant seamen, and refugees whom Britain feared might comprise Hitler’s rumoured “fifth column” of alien enemies residing within the Commonwealth. For the first time and in riveting detail, the author illuminates the conditions in one of Canada’s forgotten POW camps. Backed by interviews and meticulous archival research, Zimmermann fleshes out this rich history in an accessible, lively manner. The Little Third Reich on Lake Superior will captivate military and political historians as well as non-specialists interested in the history of POWs and internment in Canada.

War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation

by Arni Brownstone

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Aboriginal, art, History | 143

CDN $: 35.00

During much of the nineteenth century, paintings functioned as the Plains Indians’ closest equivalent to written records. The majority of their paintings documented warfare, focusing on specific war deeds. These pictorial narratives continue to expand historical knowledge of a people and place in transition. Arni Brownstone studies several important war paintings and artifact collections of the Tsuu T’ina (Sarcee) that provide insight into the changing relations between the Tsuu T’ina, other plains tribes, and non-Native communities during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. All known Tsuu T’ina paintings are considered in the study, as are several important collections of Tsuu T’ina artifacts. Brownstone’s work furthers our understanding of Tsuu T’ina pictographic war paintings in relation to the social, historical, and artistic forces that influenced them and provides a broader understanding of pictographic painting, one of the richest and most important Native American artistic and literary genres.

Why Grow Here

Essays on Edmonton's Gardening History

by Kathryn Chase Merrett

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Gardening, Hisory | 329

CDN $: 34.95

Edmonton has a rich and diverse horticultural history. Vacant lot gardeners, rose gardeners, and horticultural societies have all contributed to the beautification of the capital city of Alberta, and through the enthusiasm of florists, seedsmen, and plant breeders the city has developed a distinct horticultural character. In this collection of nine essays, each with a different theme, Kathryn Chase Merrett depicts the development of Edmonton’s social, cultural, and physical landscape as it has been shaped by champions of both nature and the garden. Edmontonians and all urbanites interested in gardening and local history, as well as professors and students of history, cultural studies, and urban design, will delight in the colourful storytelling of Why Grow Here.

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture

Canadian Periodicals in English and French 1925-1960

by Faye Hammill and Michelle Smith

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Culture, History, Non-Fiction | 240

CDN $: 49.95

A century ago, the golden age of magazine publishing coincided with the beginning of a golden age of travel. Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture centres on Canada, where commercial magazines began to flourish in the 1920s alongside an expanding network of luxury railway hotels and ocean liner routes. The leading monthlies—among them Mayfair, Chatelaine, and La Revue Moderne—presented travel as both a mode of self-improvement and a way of negotiating national identity.

The authors take a new cross-cultural approach to periodical studies, relating both French- and English-language magazines to an emerging culture of aspiration. Mainstream magazines, Hammill and Smith argue, forged a connection between upward mobility and geographical mobility. Fantasies of travel were circulated through fiction, articles, and advertisements, and used to sell fashions, foods, and domestic products as well as holidays.

Standard Candles

by Alice Major

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Poetry | 164

CDN $: 19.95

Like the ever-widening universe, Standard candles expands on Alice Major’s earlier themes of family, mythology, and cosmology, teasing out subtle wonders in form and subject. Her voice resonates through experiments with old and new poetic forms as she imbues observed and imagined phenomena—from the centres of galaxies to the mysteries of her own backyard—with the most grounded and grounding moments of human experience. In Standard candles, readers will find an emotional dimension that seamlessly intersects with the dimensions of space and time. Fans of Alice Major will enjoy seeing her work through familiar themes, while readers new to her poetry will discover unexplored universes.

The Chinghaga Firestorm

When The Moon and Sun Turned Blue

by Cordy Tymstra

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

History, Nature | 225

CDN $: 34.95

In 1950, the biggest firestorm documented in North America—one fire alone burned 3,500,000 acres of boreal forest in northern Alberta and British Columbia—created the world’s largest smoke layer in the atmosphere. The smoke travelled half way around the northern hemisphere and made the moon and sun appear blue. The Chinchaga Firestorm is an historical study of the effects of fire on the ecological process. Using technical explanations and archival discoveries, the author shows the beneficial yet destructive effects of many forest fires, including the 2011 devastation of Slave Lake, Alberta. Cordy Tymstra tells the stories of communities and individuals as their lives intersected with the path of the Chinchaga River Fire—stories that demonstrate people’s spirit, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency, and their persistence in the struggle against nature’s immense power. The 1950 event changed the way these fires are fought in Alberta and elsewhere. The Chinchaga Firestorm will appeal to wildland fire scientists, foresters, forest ecologists and policy makers, as well as those who are interested in western Canadian history and ecology.

So Far and Yet So Close

Frontier Cattle Ranching in Western Prairie Canada and the Northern Territory of Australia

by Warren M. Elofson

published by University of Calgary Press

2015

Academic, Canadian History | 320

CDN $: 34.95

This book provides a comparative study of frontier cattle ranching in two societies on opposite ends of the globe. It is also an environmental history that at the same time centres on both the natural and frontier environments. There are many points at which the western Canadian and northern Australian cattle frontiers evoke comparisons. Most obviously they came to life at about the same time: late 1870s-early 1880s. In both cases corporations were heavy investors and utilized an open range system in which tens of thousands of cattle roamed over thousands of square acres. Ranchers shared similar problems such as predators, disease, and weather, as well as markets. Ultimately, a nearly indistinguishable “country” culture developed in these geographically disparate and distant lands, which is still apparent today.

Lab Literacy for Canadian Doctors

A Guide to Ordering the Right Tests for Better Patient Care

by Dr. Christopher Naugler

published by Brush Education

2015

Medical, Textbook | 316

CDN $: 44.95

Lab Literacy for Canadian Doctors is an affordable, comprehensive pocket guide to the best lab tests for typical clinical situations, helping you improve patient care. This unique guide is about which lab investigations to do first. It outlines the most efficient and cost-effective way to use laboratory tests to support clinical diagnosis and management. – See more at: http://www.brusheducation.ca/books/lab-literacy-for-canadian-doctors#sthash.AMHM4v8y.dpuf

Weird Monuments of Canada

Quirky and Ridiculously Oversized Roadside Attractions

by Nicholle Carriere

published by Blue Bike Books

2015

Canada, Travel | 95

CDN $: 9.95

If a country’s statues say something about who they are as a people, what do Canada’s large, weird roadside attractions say about us?

 

Canada Weird Strange and True

by Lisa Wojna

published by Blue Bike Books

2015

Canada, Culture, Tradition | 225

CDN $: 16.95

This book takes you deep inside the weirdest and most peculiar aspects of our country. Yes, there is a lighthouse in Saskatchewan!! Climb 153 steps to the top. The Diefenbunker is a relic of the Cold War that was built just outside Ottawa to house essential government and military personnel in the event of a nuclear attack; it is now a museum, and many many more!

Kiss the Cod

Superstitions, Traditions, Omens and Old Wives Tales of Atlantic Canada

by Vernon Oickle

published by Blue Bike Books

2015

Canada, Culture, Tradition | 255

CDN $: 18.95

Ancient, entertaining and sometimes quirky folklore enriches all cultures, but in Atlantic Canada the many superstitions and traditions are unique.  From New Year’s cabbage dinner to the “Screech-In” you’ll find a cornucopia of great and interesting traditions here!

The Loxleys and Confederation

by Alexander Finbow, Mark Zuehkle, Claude St. Aubin, Niigaanwewidam Sinclair

published by Renegade Arts Entertainment

2015

Canada, Canadian History, Graphic Novel, History | 100

CDN $: 19.99

From the multiple award winning creators of The Loxleys and the War of 1812.
The story begins in 1864 and follows the Loxleys, a Canadian family living in the Niagara peninsula.  Under the threat once more of an American invasion and the cancellation of the Canadian-Ameican Reciprocity Treaty, the Canadian Colonies look to unite.  We trail the Loxleys on their journey to the Charlottetown Conference and witness the events that lead to the Dominion of Canada.

Fundamentals of Public Relations and Marketing Communications in Canada

by ed. William Wray Carney and Leah-Ann Lymer

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Communications, Scholarly, Writing | 520

CDN $: 60.00

Experts in public relations, marketing, and communications have created the most comprehensive textbook specifically for Canadian students and instructors. Logically organized to lead students from principles to their application—and generously supplemented with examples and case studies—the book features chapters on theory, history, law, ethics, research methods, planning, writing, marketing, advertising, media, and government relations, as well as digital, internal, and crisis communications.

Overcoming Conflicting Loyalties

Intimate Partner Violence, Community Resources, and Faith

by Irene Sevcik, Michael Rothery, Nancy Nason-Clark, and Robert Pynn

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Psychology, Religion, Women's Studies | 250

CDN $: 34.95

To date, little has been published about the place of spirituality in working with survivors of intimate partner violence. Overcoming Conflicting Loyalties examines the intersection of faith and culture in the lives of religious and ethno-cultural women in the context of the work of FaithLink, a unique community initiative that encourages religious leaders and secular service providers to work together. The authors present the benefits of such cooperation by reporting the findings of three qualitative research studies. Individuals in secular and sacral services who work with victims of domestic violence, as well as academics in the fields of social work, psychology, and religious studies, will benefit from the insights, depth of experience, and range of voices represented in this valuable book.

A Canadian Girl in South Africa

A Teacher's Experience in the South African War, 1899-1902

by E. Maud Graham

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

History, Memoir | 220

CDN $: 34.5

As the South African War reached its grueling end in 1902, colonial interests at the highest levels of the British Empire hand-picked teachers from across the Commonwealth to teach the thousands of Boer children living in concentration camps. Highly educated, hard working, and often opinionated, E. Maud Graham joined the Canadian contingent of forty teachers. Her eyewitness account reveals the complexity of relations and tensions at a controversial period in the histories of both Britain and South Africa. Graham presents a lively historical travel memoir, and the editors have provided rich political and historical context to her narrative in the Introduction and generous annotations. This is a rare primary source for experts in Colonial Studies, Women’s Studies, and Canadian, South African, and British Imperial History. Readers with an interest in the South African War will be intrigued by Graham’s observations on South African society at the end of the Victorian era.

Prairie Bohemian

Frank Guy's Life in Music

by Trevor W. Harrison

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Biography, History, Music | 248

CDN $: 24.95

Until his death in 1982, Edmonton luthier and guitarist Frank Gay built guitars for several famous musicians, including country stars Johnny Cash, Don Gibson, Webb Pierce, and Hank Snow. He captivated listeners with his singular talent on guitar and other instruments, and was well known within the music industry. Trevor Harrison’s detective work uncovers the story of this private, charming, and bohemian man, doing a tremendous service to Canadian culture and music history. Harrison pieces together Frank Gay’s life through interviews with people who knew him and saw him play. Very few recordings of him playing exist, and the sparse accounts of Gay’s life and work raise more questions than they answer. Musicians and instrument makers, as well as those interested in Canadian music or Edmonton’s colourful past, will be fascinated by this biography of western Canadian luthier, musician, and guitar virtuoso Frank Gay.

Welcome to the Circus

by Rhonda Douglas

published by Freehand Books

2015

Fiction, short stories | 173

CDN $: 21.95

In these stories, a choir processes its collective grief at the loss of one of its members to cancer; a teenage boy marks himself with the poetry of John Donne; God explains the collapse of the cod fishery; Mata Hari stands trial; and two sisters try to reconcile their respective places in the family porn emporium business before everything blows up.

The Mystics of Mile End

by Sigal Samuel

published by Freehand Books

2015

Fiction | 288

CDN $: 21.95

Four distinct voices weave together the tale of a dysfunctional Montreal family obsessed with climbing the Kabbalah’s Tree of Life. This literary debut by Jewish Daily Forward editor Sigal Samuel is reminiscent of Nicole Krauss’s The History of Love and Myla Goldberg’s Bee Season.

Entropic

Stories

by R. W. Gray

published by NeWest Press

2015

Fiction, short stories | 230

CDN $: 19.95

In this collection of stories, author and filmmaker R. W. Gray (Crisp) finds the place where the beautiful, the strange, and the surreal all meet — sometimes meshing harmoniously, sometimes colliding with terrible violence, launching his characters into a redefined reality.

A lovestruck man discovers the secret editing room where his girlfriend erases all her flaws; a massage artist finds that she has a gift, but is uncertain of the price; a beautiful man sets out to be done with beauty; and a gay couple meets what appear to be younger versions of themselves, learning that history can indeed repeat itself.

Things You’ve Inherited From Your Mother

A Novel

by Hollie Adams

published by NeWest Press

2015

Fiction, Novel | 165

CDN $: 19.95

Everyone deals with grief in their own personal way. Take Carrie, for example. To get over her mother’s death from ovarian cancer, she launches a passive-aggressive war with her fellow office workers, embarks on a campaign designed to let her ex-husband know she’s over him (which naturally only pushes her teenage daughter farther away), and plots to rid herself of her mother’s overweight cat, all the while consuming heroic quantities of red wine, spiked coffee, and coffin nails. Nobody’s perfect.

Dear Johnny Deere

by Ken Cameron

published by NeWest Press

2015

Play | 134

CDN $: 18.95

It’s hard enough for Johnny and his wife Caroline to keep their farm afloat when the banks, the government, technology, and nature itself all seem in collusion against them. But when an old high school classmate—now a handsome land speculator—returns to town, Johnny and Caroline’s marriage is at stake as well.

The Guy Who Pumps Your Gas Hates You

A Novel

by Sean Trinder

published by NeWest Press

2015

Fiction, Novel | 244

CDN $: 19.95

Brendan is 20. He’s been pumping gas for three years, working the evening shift at the CountryGas station in Winnipeg. He’s gotten good at it. Which is sad. And Brendan knows that unless something happens fast, he’ll be stuck in this rut forever, inhaling gas fumes and quietly seething at the idiot customers endlessly parading past him. Will the writing course he’s signed up for at the local university—and the older woman he meets there—be enough to get Brendan’s life back on track?

Hillsdale Book

by Gerald Hill

published by NeWest Press

2015

Poetry | 126

CDN $: 19.95

Welcome to Hillsdale!

In his new poetry collection, Gerald Hill invites you to take a cruise down the streets of Hillsdale, learn about its architecture, rehearse its schoolyard taunts and sample its denizens’ favourite drink recipes. Fusing history, geography and autobiography to create a document of life in Regina’s suburbs, then and now, Hill peels back placid suburban archetypes to expose the messy, challenging systems churning underneath.

Winter in Canada

Weird facts, records, nostalgia, hockey, stats, childhood memories and more

by Jerry Toupin

published by Folklore Publishing

2015

History | 245

CDN $: 18.95

As Gilles Vigneault wrote:
Mon pays ce n’est pas un pays, c’est l’hiver.
Translation: My country is not a country, it is winter.
Weather, and especially how people feel about the weather in the wintertime is the one topic you can be sure that we all talk about. Dr. Toupin has some thoughts on winter that he has been exploring for almost 25 years; he has studied it environmentally and surveyed people’s perceptions.

My Own Portrait in Writing

Self Fashioning In The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

by Patrick Grant

published by AU Press

2015

art, Art History | 183

CDN $: 27.95

Art historians, biographers, and other researchers have long drawn on Van Gogh’s voluminous correspondence—more than eight hundred letters—for insights into both his personal struggles and his art. But the letters, while often admired for their literary quality, have rarely been approached as literature. In this volume, Patrick Grant sets out to explore the question, “By what criteria do we judge Van Gogh’s letters to be, specifically, literary?” Drawing, especially, on Mikhail Bakhtin’s conceptualization of self-awareness as an ongoing dialogue between “self” and “other,” Grant examines the ways in which Van Gogh’s letters raise, from within themselves, questions and issues to which they also respond.

History of the Grey Cup

by Graham Kelly

published by Full Court Press

2015

History, Sports | 383

CDN $: 19.95

History of the Grey Cup features the trials and triumphs of Canada’s national classic since its beginnings in 1909.  Sportswriter and football aficionado Graham Kelly brings to life the passion and excitement of the finals of Canada’s own game.

Textual Exposures

Photography in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Narrative Fiction

by Dan Russek

published by University of Calgary Press

2015

| 228

CDN $: 34.95

This book examines how twentieth-century Spanish American literature has registered photography’s powers and limitations, and the creative ways in which writers of this region of the Americas have elaborated in fictional form the conventions and assumptions of this medium. While the book is essentially a study of literary criticism, it also aims to show how texts critically reflect upon the media environment in which they were created. The writings analyzed enter a dialogic relation with visual technologies such as the x-ray, cinema, illustrated journalism, and television. The study examines how these technologies, historically and aesthetically linked to the photographic medium, inform the works of some of the most important writers in Latin America.

Expiration Date

When Your Time is Up

by ed. Nancy Kilpatrick

published by Edge

2015

Fiction | 274

CDN $: 15.95

Modern lives seem littered with expiration dates. Packaging tells us when our food will go bad; when we can expect appliances to cease functioning; when contracts for the internet finish! But as annoying as these small expiration dates are, they fade to nothing compared to the larger events: when a species goes extinct; when a body of water evaporates, or dies because the PH balance alters; when giant icebergs break apart and glaciers melt forever, threatening the ecosystem of this planet.

Nancy Kilpatrick has gathered together twenty-five original stories to look at the what-if’s of our expiring future.

These stories span a range of emotions. Some will make you laugh, other will make you cry. They are grim and hopeful, sad and joyous, horrifying and comforting. You can expect to be touched in some way.

Blood Matters

by Aviva Bel'Harold

published by Edge

2015

Fiction, Horror | 330

CDN $: 14.95

Brittany used to be a normal teen. She ate like one, slept like one, and had typical teenage mood swings. But after she found her best friend dead, everything changed.

Grief might explain her loss of appetite and her lack of sleep. It might even explain why she sees her dead friend everywhere she goes. But it certainly won’t explain why everyone she touches develops bruises or why she’s attracted to the smell of blood.

And what’s with the urges to eat her new boyfriend?

The Occasional Diamond Thief

by J. A. McLachlan

published by Edge

2015

Science Fiction | 291

CDN $: 14.95

When 16-yr-old Kia is training to be a universal translator, she is co-opted into travelling as a translator to Malem. This is the last place in the universe that Kia wants to be—it’s the planet where her father caught the terrible illness that killed him—but it’s also where he got the magnificent diamond that only she knows about. Kia is convinced he stole it, as it is illegal for any off-worlder to possess a Malemese diamond.

Using her skill in languages – and another skill she picked up, the skill of picking locks – Kia unravels the secret of the mysterious gem and learns what she must do to set things right: return the diamond to its original owner.

Wrestling with Gods

Tesseracts Eighteen

by ed. Liana Kerzner and Jerome Stueart

published by Edge

2015

Fantasy, Science Fiction | 265

CDN $: 15.95

A mechanical Jesus for your shrine, the myths of cuttlefish, a vampire in residential schools, a Muslim woman who wants to get closer, surgically, to her god, the demons of outer space, the downside of Nirvana. The 24 science fiction and fantasy stories and poems included in Tesseracts 18: Wrestling with Gods take their faith and religion into the future, into the weird and comic and thought-provoking spaces where science fiction and fantasy has really always gone, struggling with higher powers, gods, the limits of technology, the limits of spiritual experience.

At times profound, these speculative offerings give readers a chance to see faith from the believer and the skeptic in worlds where what you believe is a matter of life, death, and afterlife.

Medicinal Garden Plants for Canada

by Alison Beck, A. H. Jackson

published by Lone Pine

2015

Gardening | 208

CDN $: 24.95

Traditionally, plants were used to treat and cure whatever ails, from cuts and burns to colds and flu, from stress and insomnia to arthritis and hemorrhoids. Now you can harness nature’s healing power in your garden. In this book, which has been seven years in development, veteran garden writers Alison Beck and A.H. Jackson feature some of the most common and easy-to-grow plants that also have medicinal qualities.

Legacy in Time

Three Generations of Mountain Photography in the Canadian West

by Henry Vaux Jr.

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

Climate Change, Photography | 128

CDN $: 30.00

Beginning in 1997, Henry Vaux Jr. has been taking duplicate photographs of the glaciers his grandfather and great aunt and uncle captured on glass plates a century before. Standing in exactly the same locations with his own tripod and camera, Henry Vaux Jr. has documented a century of change and created an extraordinary artistic and historical document that will inspire many and tell a story that was three generations in the making.

This project serves as a remarkable collection of “before and after” photographs of glacier formations in the Canadian Alps, dramatically capturing the impact of climate change on this profoundly important and iconic landscape.

 

We Are Coming Home

Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence

by Gerald T. Conaty ed.

published by AU Press

2015

Aboriginal, History | 300

CDN $: 34.95

We Are Coming Home is the story of the highly complex process of repatriation as described by those intimately involved in the work, notably the Piikani, Siksika, and Kainai elders who provided essential oversight and guidance. We also hear from the Glenbow Museum’s president and CEO at the time and from an archaeologist then employed at the Provincial Museum of Alberta who provides an insider’s view of the drafting of FNSCORA. These accounts are framed by Conaty’s reflections on the impact of museums on First Nations, on the history and culture of the Niitsitapi, or Blackfoot, and on the path forward. With Conaty’s passing in August of 2013, this book is also a tribute to his enduring relationships with the Blackfoot, to his rich and exemplary career, and to his commitment to innovation and mindful museum practice.

Mahmoud

by Tara Grammy & Tom Arthur Davis

published by Playwrights Canada Press

2015

Drama | 52

CDN $: 16.95

Mahmoud is an exuberant, if overwhelmingly passionate, Iranian engineer-cum-taxi driver who relishes the chance to regale his passengers with his love of Persian culture. Emanuelos, a fabulously gay Spanish perfume salesman, can talk a mile-a-minute about his boyfriend, Behnam. And then there’s Tara, an awkwardly charming Iranian Canadian preteen who just wants to be “normal,” whatever that means. When the three strangers find themselves crossing paths in the busy streets of Toronto, their experiences with racism, sexism, homophobia, homesickness, and everything in between become intertwined in unexpected ways

The Thrill

by Judith Thompson

published by Playwrights Canada Press

2015

Drama | 86

CDN $: 16.95

Elora Dixon is a vibrant, middle-aged lawyer and disability-rights activist who has never walked a step in her life. A neuromuscular disease left her with a curved spine and a reliance on around-the-clock care. Nonetheless, she is an inexorable force when chance pits her against the notorious Julian Summer, who is in town promoting his internationally bestselling book. Julian is a fervent supporter of euthanasia, and Elora is the counter-argument—a living rebuke to parents who want the option of euthanizing a disabled newborn. So it comes as a shock, especially to Elora, when the two find themselves acutely attracted to one another. Will she learn to negotiate her feelings and her convictions, or will Julian’s beliefs begin to colour her own?

The Gravitational Pull of Bernice Trimble

by Beth Graham

published by Playwrights Canada Press

2015

Drama | 97

CDN $: 16.95

Iris Trimble is trying to hold it all together. She may very well fly off the face of the earth if she doesn’t hang on to the kitchen counter. At least that’s how she feels after her mother, Bernice, a lively, recently widowed fifty-nine-year-old breaks the news that she has Alzheimer’s. In an effort to cope with the stress, Iris makes her mother’s famous Everything That Is Bad For You Casserole, a childhood favourite. Her siblings, on the other hand, are on opposite sides of the spectrum: Sarah, the eldest, irately demands a second opinion, while Peter, the youngest, seems completely unfazed. As for Bernice, she’s still as vivacious as ever, always up for a good laugh, and, most of all, ready to finally put herself first.

From the Elephant’s Back

Collected Essays & Travel Writings

by Lawrence Durrell. James Gifford ed.

published by U of A Press

2015

literature | 406

CDN $: 39.95

“This collection has a straightforward ambition: to redirect the interpretive perspective that readers bring to Lawrence Durrell’s literary works by returning their attention to his short prose.” – From the Introduction Best known for his novels and travel writing, Lawrence Durrell defied easy classification within twentieth-century Modernism. His antiauthoritarian tendencies put him at odds with many contemporaries—aesthetically and politically. However, thanks to a compelling recontextualization by editor James Gifford, these 38 previously unpublished and out-of-print essays and letters reveal that Durrell’s maturation as an artist was rich, complex, and subtle. This edition promises to open up new approaches to interpreting his more famous works. Durrell fans will treasure this selection of rare nonfiction, while scholars of Durrell, modernist literature, and antiauthoritarian artists, and the Personalist movement will also appreciate Gifford’s fine editorial work.

Upgrading Oilsands Bitumen and Heavy Oil

by Murray R. Gray

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Oil and Oilsands, Textbook | 500

CDN $: 85.00

“The emphasis throughout is to link the fundamentals of the molecules through to the economic drivers for the industry, because this combination determines the technology used for processing.”—From the Introduction The high demand for quality petroleum products necessitates ongoing innovation in the science and engineering underlying oilsands extraction and upgrading. Beginning with a thorough grounding in the composition, fluid properties, reaction behaviour, and economics of bitumen and heavy oil, Murray Gray then delves into current processing technologies, particularly those used at full commercial scale. The tables of data on composition, yield, and behaviour of oilsands bitumen and heavy oil fractions are extensive. Though the focus is on bitumen from Alberta’s oilsands—the largest resource in the world—the science applies to upgrading of heavy oil and petroleum residue feeds worldwide. Upgrading Oilsands Bitumen and Heavy Oil lays out the current best practice for engineers and scientists in the oilsands and refining industries, government personnel, academics, and students.

Darn Good Dandies

by Nadine Mackenzie

published by Frontenac House

2015

History | 95

CDN $: 19.95

In 1882, in the midst of a current fervour for tartans and all things Scottish, two brothers published Vestiarium Scoticum, a replica of an ancient catalogue of ancestral clan tartans that they claimed to have been found in a monastery in France. While the book was enthusiastically received by both the public and the clothing industry, there were doubters and critics and claims of outright fraud. But the book persisted and today more than 70 of its tartans are still being worn by the various clans, and many still believe that the ancestral designs go back to the dawn of time. Was Vestiarium Scoticum a genuine ancient text? Or was it a monumental fraud on the public? And who were these so-called “brothers” who claimed to be the grandsons of the Young Pretender, Bonnie Prince Charlie?  Darn good Dandies! weaves its way through the lives and mysteries and countless name changes of the eccentric Sobieski Stuart brothers

Pat Martin Bates

Balancing on a Thread

by Patricia Bovey

published by Frontenac House

2015

art | 186

CDN $: 50.00

Pat Martin Bates is an internationally acclaimed artist and printmaker who has created a singular body of compelling work extending over half a century. She has visually synthesized an endless range of complex interests, ideas, philosophies and world mythologies in an approach to art that is innovative, diverse and unique. As painter, printmaker and sculptor, Bates pioneered or transformed many new techniques to develop a distinctive visual vocabulary through collaging, printing, painting, embossing, and piercingSrt

The Dumbing of Canadian Democracy

The Fall of Responsible Government

by Peter Boer

published by Folklore Publishing

2015

History, Politics | 278

CDN $: 18.95

Political scandals abound in our country, no digging required. The windowsill of responsible government in Canada has become grimy with the dirt of recent lies and antics. The Conservatives have run roughshod over Parliament with their use of massive omnibus bills that include many smaller, unrelated pieces of legislation crammed into one bill, making it difficult for MPs to give each part the attention it deserves.  This book examines and enumerates many of the scandals surrounding the Conservative government.

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities

Resisting a Dangerous Order

by Shawna Ferris

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Non-Fiction | 230

CDN $: 34.95

Canadian cities are striving for high safety ratings by eliminating crime, which includes “cleaning” urban areas of the street sex industry. Ironically, those same sex workers also want to live and work in a safe environment. Shawna Ferris interrogates sanitizing political agendas, analyzes exclusionary legislative and police initiatives, and examines media representations. She gives a voice to sex workers who are often pushed to the background, even by those who fight for them. In the name of urban safety and orderliness, street sex workers face stigma, racism, and ignorance. Their human rights are ignored, and some even lose their lives. Ferris aims to reveal the cultural dimensions of this discrimination through literary and art-critical theory, legal and sociological research, and activist intervention. This book has much to offer to educators and activists, sex workers and anti-violence organizations, and academics studying women, cultural, gender, or indigenous issues.

Trying Again to Stop Time

Selected Poems

by Jalal Barzanji

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Poetry | 122

CDN $: 19.95

“One morning, long ago, juice from an apple dripped onto my words, leaving them stained forever. “ – From “A Soulful Sunshine” Jalal Barzanji’s poetry willingly mutates his native Kurdish experiences into the global. In the tradition of Taslima Nasrin, Adonis, Yehuda Amichai, and Mahmoud Darwish, he speaks with the authority of exile, of the tension that exists between home and an adoptive land, of that delicate dance of defiance in the face of censorship and oppression. Barzanji’s poetry is infused with the richness of the Middle East, but underneath, there are also strands of Baudelaire, Rimbaud and T.S. Eliot. It is here, in these moments where language and culture collide and co-operate that Barzanji finds a voice that in its insistence on remaining true to itself, carves out a strong voice of opposition to political oppression. Barzanji will draw readers to his work again and again, the way in which we return to a favourite canvas.

A Year of Days

by Myrl Coulter

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

literature | 196

CDN $: 24.95

“As soon as she was gone from this earth, I felt an overwhelming need for more of her. I had to find her again. But how do you find someone after they’re gone for good?” After her mother succumbed to a rare form of dementia, Myrl Coulter returned to the eulogy she wrote for the funeral and expanded it into meditations on the troubling absence of what had been a fraught relationship. The result is fifteen personal narrative essays that travel through the vacations, annual holidays, special occasions, and regular ordinary days each year brings. Coulter quests for the mother who is already gone and yet remains all around her, no matter where she is. In every captivating detail of Coulter’s world, A Year of Days offers readers an intimate odyssey of experience and a cathartic finish.

A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance

Imagining Multilingualism

by Tomson Highway

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

literature | 37

CDN $: 10.95

“Fasten your chastity belts, ladies and gentlemen, it’s gonna be a bumpy ride.” From his legendary birth in a snowbank in northwestern Manitoba, through his metamorphosis to citizen-artist of the world, polyglot, playwright, pianist, storyteller, and irreverent disciple of the Trickster, Tomson Highway rides roughshod through the languages and communities that have shaped him. Cree, Dene, Latin, French, English, Spanish, and the universal language of music have opened windows and widened horizons in Highway’s life. Readers who can hang on tight—Highway fans, culture mavens, cunning linguists, and fellow tricksters—will experience the profundity of Highway’s humour, for as he says, “In Cree, you will laugh until you weep.”

Theatre, Teens, Sex Ed

Are We There Yet?

by Jan Selman and Jane Heather

published by University of Alberta Press

2015

Education, Non-Fiction, Theatre | 536

CDN $: 49.95

When the topic is sex, fear and embarrassment prevent frank and meaningful communication between teens and adults. Using participatory theatre can break the uncomfortable silence, and with over 700 performances across Canada, Jane Heather’s play Are We There Yet? has been an effective tool for teaching teen sexuality since 1998. The play and program were the subject of a major impact assessment and researchers of many kinds examined how and why theatre can make change. This comprehensive, well-organized volume by two leading experts offers a rich diversity of material and analysis. The play appears in the volume and is available for separate purchase as a reproducible PDF, and a video production of examples of theatrical participation is included on a pocketed DVD. Theatre, Teens, Sex Ed will be a valuable resource for academics, practitioners, and specialist readerships in the fields of theatre, sex education, sociology, and public health. Contributors: Shaniff Esmail, Brenda Munro, Tracy L. Bear, James McKinnon, and the Are We There Yet? Community University Research Alliance.

Rocks in the Water, Rocks in the Sun

A Memoir from the Heart of Haiti

by Vilomond Joegodson Deralcine and Paul Jackson

published by AU Press

2015

History, Memoir | 375

CDN $: 24.95

When Joegodson Déralciné was still a small child, his parents left rural Haiti to resettle in the rapidly growing zones of Port-au-Prince. In honest, reflective prose, Joegodson allows us to walk in the ditches of Cité Soleil, to hide from the macoutes under the bed, to feel the ache of an empty stomach. But, most importantly, he provides an account of life in Haiti from a perspective that is rarely heard. Free of sentimentality and hackneyed clichés, his narrative explores the spirituality of Vodou, Catholicism, and Protestantism, describes the harrowing day of the 2010 earthquake and its aftermath, and illustrates the inner workings of MINUSTAH.

Garden Pests and Diseases in Canada

The Good, the Bad and the Slimy

by Rob Sproule

published by Lone Pine

2015

Gardening | 192

CDN $: 24.95

Your garden is full of creepy-crawlies—some good, some bad, and nearly all ugly. Whether you decide to wage war or peacefully  co-exist, Rob Sproule has the expert information and advice on how to identify and manage 50 of the most common pests and diseases to threaten Canadian gardens.

Medicinal Garden Plants for Canada

by Alison Beck, A. H. Jackson

published by Lone Pine

2015

Gardening | 192

CDN $: 24.95

Traditionally, plants were used to treat and cure whatever ails, from cuts and burns to colds and flu, from stress and insomnia to arthritis and hemorrhoids. Now you can harness nature’s healing power in your garden. In this book, which has been seven years in development, veteran garden writers Alison Beck and A.H. Jackson feature some of the most common and easy-to-grow plants that also have medicinal qualities.

Calypso

by David S. MacKenzie

published by Great Escape Publications

2015

Fiction | 240

With money, status and a beautiful wife, oil executive Vince Morgan is both admired and envied.  But his controversial new vision for the future of Barbados triggers a deep rift within the country.  Morgan’s empire is suddenly threatened by an unexpected crisis in Texas and by deeper troubles closer to home.  As his world crumbs apart, Morgan looks outward for help and draws on what remains of his inner strength.  (Contact publisher at 7809865796 or dsmackenzie[at]shaw.ca in lieu of website).

Robbie Burns: Witch Hunter

by Gordon Rennie, Emily Beeby

published by Renegade Arts and Entertainment

2015

Graphic Novel | 100

CDN $: 19.99

Burns was loved as a lyricist, farmer and even as a ladies’ man.  Now prepare to meet Burns, scourge of all evil and witch hunter in training!

Two visionary writers from Edinburgh, Gordon Rennie and Emma Beeby, have created a new depiction of the nation’s most loved poet, based on the epic character of the famous narrative poem Tam o’Shanter.  Tiernen Trevallion, one of the UK’s most promising new comic artists, provides the artwork.

Frostbike

The Joy, Pain and Numbness of Winter Cycling

by Tom Babin

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

Sports, Transportation, Winter | 304

CDN $: 20.00

The bicycle is fast becoming a ubiquitous form of transportation in cities all over the world, making our urban spaces more efficient, more livable and healthier. But many of those bicycles disappear into basements and garages when the warm months end, parked there by owners fearful of the cold, snow and ice that winter brings. But does it have to be that way?

Canadian writer and journalist Tom Babin started questioning this dogma after being stuck in winter commuter traffic one dreary and cold December morning and dreaming about the happiness that bicycle commuting had brought him all summer long. So he did something about it, and wrote this book.

 

Lost and Found

Adrift in the Canadian Rockies

by Jamey Glasnovic

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

Travel | 374

CDN $: 25.00

For many people, moving to a mountain town is the realization of a dream, the final step in a pilgrimage to a relaxed lifestyle in a rugged and beautiful setting. After a long journey that began when he was a teenager in the 1980s with the vague idea there might be a better life somewhere “out west,” Jamey Glasnovic eventually fled the chaos and stress of the big city and tried to settle into an uncomplicated Rocky Mountain existence.

Canmore, Alberta, a small community nestled in a picturesque valley situated right at the edge of Banff National Park, should have been the perfect end to his searching. A rapidly growing town emerging on the tourism radar can strain anyone’s definition of paradise, however, and Lost and Found is Glasnovic’s account of his attempt, in the fall of 2008, to recapture the simple wonders of living on the boundaries of a vast wilderness.

Buried

by Ken Wylie

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

Mountaineering, Sports | 270

CDN $: 25.00

On January 20, 2003, at 10:45 a.m., a massive avalanche released from Tumbledown Mountain in the Selkirk Range of British Columbia. Tonnes of snow carried 13 members of two guided backcountry skiing groups down the 37-degree incline of a run called La Traviata and buried them. After a frantic hour of digging by remaining group members, an unthinkable outcome became reality. Seven people were dead.

Buried is the assistant guide’s story. It renders an answerable truth about what happened by delving deep into the human factors that played into putting people in harm’s way. The story begins buried metres deep in snow, and through care-filled reflection emerges slowly like spring after a long winter, nurturing a hopeful, courageous dialogue for all who make journeys through the mountains of their life. The story illustrates the peace that comes from accountability and the growth that results from understanding

Legacy In Time

Three Generations of Mountain Photography in the Canadian West

by Henry Vaux Jr.

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

History, Photography | 128

CDN $: 30.00

Among the early North American explorers in the Rogers Pass, Yoho and Banff regions of western Canada were members of the Vaux family of Philadelphia. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, George Vaux Jr. (1863–1927), William S. Vaux (1872–1908) and Mary M. Vaux (1880–1940) regularly visited the majestic peaks, studying the massive glacier formations and creating a brilliant photographic record that features some of the earliest images of glaciers in the mountains of western Canada.

Beginning in 1997, Henry Vaux Jr. has been taking duplicate photographs of the glaciers his grandfather and great aunt and uncle captured on glass plates a century before. Standing in exactly the same locations with his own tripod and camera, Henry Vaux Jr. has documented a century of change and created an extraordinary artistic and historical document that will inspire many and tell a story that was three generations in the making.

Beautiful Destruction

by Louis Helbig

published by Rocky Mountain Books

2015

Photography | 300

CDN $: 75.00

The Alberta oil/tar sands are a place of superlatives, of awesome beauty and equally awesome destruction. They are a kaleidoscope of contrasts, colours and patterns keeping time with the seemingly unstoppable movement of machinery, smoke and effluent set in an immense boreal landscape with its own immutable patterns, cadence and cycles.

Beautiful Destruction is a large-format, high-quality photography book that uses over 100 stunning, full-colour aerial photographs to transcend the polarities that dominate public discourse of the largest industrial project in North America: the Alberta oil/tar sands.

Hobohemia and the Crucifixion Machine

Rival Images of a New World in 1930s Vancouver

by Todd McCallum

published by AU Press

2015

History | 318

CDN $: 29.95

In the early years of the Great Depression, thousands of unemployed homeless transients settled into Vancouver’s “hobo jungle.” The jungle operated as a distinct community, in which goods were exchanged and shared directly, without benefit of currency. The organization of life was immediate and consensual, conducted in the absence of capital accumulation. But as the transients moved from the jungles to the city, they made innumerable demands on Vancouver’s Relief Department, consuming financial resources at a rate that threatened the city with bankruptcy. In response, the municipality instituted a card-control system—no longer offering relief recipients currency to do with as they chose. It also implemented new investigative and assessment procedures, including office spies, to weed out organizational inefficiencies. McCallum argues that, threatened by this “ungovernable society,” Vancouver’s Relief Department employed Fordist management methods that ultimately stripped the transients of their individuality.

To Keep a Secret

by Benda Chapman

published by Grass Roots Books

2015

Fiction, Mystery | 104

CDN $: 9.95

Anna Sweet’s PI business partner, Jada Price, has gone missing. Anna and new hire Nick Roma team up to find her. The trail leads them to a teenage girl’s murder and a secret internet dating site. Anna is about to discover how far people will go to keep a secret, and who they will betray. She must work quickly to uncover the answers before a second victim dies. Will this case prove too difficult for Anna Sweet? Or will she put the clues together in time to outsmart a killer who has everything to lose?

A Model Death

by Brenda Chapman

published by Grass Roots Press

2015

Fiction, Mystery | 86

CDN $: 9.95

Anna Sweet accepts a date with Nick Roma, office manager for Storm Investigations. Just before their date, the body of Nick’s ex-girlfriend is found near a lake. Rumours swirl that Nick was hounding his ex to get back together…and he wouldn’t take no for an answer. This gripping mystery is ideal for the reluctant reader. A Model Death is the fourth title in the Anna Sweet Mysteries Series.

Big Bear

by Terry Barber

published by Grass Roots Press

2015

History, Indigenous | 48

CDN $: 12.95

Big Bear was a famous Cree leader who hoped for peace between the white settlers and the Cree. He signed a peace treaty with the Blackfoot, believing that violence does not bring peace. He held out on signing Treaty 6 hoping to win more rights for his people. In the end, Big Bear had no choice but to sign the treaty. Broken promises led to bloodshed at Frog Lake and Fort Pitt in spite of Big Bear’s efforts to promote peace. Big Bear was found guilty of treason and imprisoned for one year. He died in 1888.

Tough Crimes

True Cases by Top Canadian Criminal Lawyers

by C.D Evans and Lorene Shyba, Editors

published by Durance Vile Publications

2015

Crime, Law | 277

CDN $: 29.95

Tough Crimes is a collection of thoughtful and insightful stories by twenty of Canada’s most prominent criminal lawyers. In the book, they write about cases that had weird or surprising turns or presented personal or ethical challenges.

Mission Life in Cree-Ojibwe Country

Memories of a Mother and Son

by Jennifer S. H. Brown

published by AU Press

2015

Aboriginal, History, Women | 316

In May of 1868, Elizabeth Bingham Young and her new husband, Egerton Ryerson Young, began a long journey from Hamilton, Ontario, to the Methodist mission of Rossville. For the next eight years, Elizabeth supported her husband’s work at two mission houses, Norway House and then Berens River. Unprepared for the difficult conditions and the “eight months long” winter, and unimpressed with “eating fish twenty-one times a week,” the young Upper Canada wife rose to the challenge. In these remote outposts, she gave birth to three children, acted as a nurse and doctor, and applied both perseverance and determination to learning Cree, while also coping with poverty and short supplies within her community. Her account of mission life, as seen through the eyes of a woman, is the first of its kind to be archived and now to appear in print.

A Historical and Legal Study of Sovereignty in the Canadian North

by Gordon Smith and Whitney Lackenbauer (editor)

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

History | 491

This work is the first in a project to edit and publish Gordon Smith’s unpublished opus a manuscript on “A Historical and Legal Study of Sovereignty in the Canadian North and Related Law of the Sea Problems.” Written over three decades (yet incomplete at the time of his death in 2000), this work may well be the most comprehensive study on the nature and importance of the Canadian North in existence.

Landscapes of War and Memory

by Sherrill Grace

published by University of Alberta Press

2014

History, literature | 610

CDN $: $49.95

Since 1977, a new generation of Canadian writers and artists has been mapping the cultural landscapes formed by the memories of war we have inherited, and also the ones we are expected to forget. Challenging, even painful, the art and literature in Grace’s magisterial study build causeways into history, connecting us to trials and traumas many Canadians have never known but that haunt society in subtle and compelling ways. A contemporary scholar of the period under examination, Grace exemplifies her role as witness, investing the text with personal, often lyrical, responses as a way of enacting this crucial memory work. This comprehensive study is intended for Canadians, scholars, and students interested in literature, theatre, and art relating to memories of the world wars.

Personal Modernisms

Anarchist Networks and the Later Avant-Gardes

by James Gifford

published by University of Alberta Press

2014

History, Literary | 295

CDN $: $34.95

Gifford’s invigorating work of metacriticism and literary history recovers the significance of the “lost generation” of writers of the 1930s and 1940s. He examines how the Personalism of anarcho-anti-authoritarian contemporaries such as Alex Comfort, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Durrell, J.F. Hendry, Henry Miller, Elizabeth Smart, Dylan Thomas, and Henry Treece forges a missing link between Late Modernist and postmodernist literature. He concludes by applying his recontextualization to four familiar texts by Miller, Durrell, Smart, and Duncan, and encourages readers to re-engage the lost generation using this new critical lens. Scholars and students of literary modernism, 20th century Canadian literature, and anarchism will find a productive vision of this neglected period within Personal Modernisms.

A Historical and Legal Study of Sovereignty in the Canadian North

Terrestrial Sovereignty, 1870-1939

by P. Whitney Lackenbauer

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Business, Economics, History | 512

CDN $: 39.95

Dr. Gordon W. Smith dedicated much of his life researching the international history of the Canadian Arctic. This volume provides the most comprehensive documentation available on the post-Confederation history of Canadian sovereignty in the north.

Between Clay and Dust

by Musharraf Ali Farooqi

published by Freehand Books

2014

| 240

CDN $: 19.95

Powerful and haunting, Between Clay and Dust is a triumph of storytelling, a poignant exploration of love, honour, redemption, and the strength that heat should find to go on when all is lost. A finalist for the prestigious Man Asian Literary Prize.

Detachment

An Adoption Memoir

by Maurice Mierau

published by Freehand Books

2014

| 232

CDN $: 21.95

A moving and searingly unsentimental memoir about learning to become a father and a son. Mierau tells his story about adopting two sons from Ukraine, dealing with attachment disorder, and untangling his own Mennonite fathers’ Ukrainian past.

Blind Spot

by Laurence Miall

published by NeWest Press

2014

| 232

CDN $: 19.95

When Luke returns to Edmonton after the death of his parents, he sets in motion a chain of events that will bring to light long-buried family secrets. In Luke, Laurence Miall has crafted an unforgettable literary anti-hero, a man disconnected from the pain of those around him, yet blind to his own faults. With clean, forceful language and a familiarity with the darker corners of the male psyche, Blind Spot is a gripping literary debut.

Some Extremely Boring Drives

Stories

by Marguerite Pigeon

published by NeWest Press

2014

short stories | 216

CDN $: 19.95

Marguerite Pigeon takes readers on a roundabout tour of locations around the world in this wonderfully not-boring collection of stories. From the multi-talented author of Inventory and Open Pit comes a new collection of short stories, filled with lost souls drifting through exotic locales, reinventing themselves on the fly.

North East

by Wendy McGrath

published by NeWest Press

2014

Fiction | 128

CDN $: 17.95

In North East, Wendy McGrath paints a picture of a mid-century Canadian city on the verge of change, and a child on the verge of losing her innocence.

Glycerine

by Garry Ryan

published by NeWest Press

2014

Crime, Fiction | 194

CDN $: 18.95

In the latest Detective Lane adventure, Calgary’s favourite cop has new responsibilities, a new partner, and a fiendish new foe to apprehend.

Bittersweet Sands

24 Days in Fort McMurray

by Rick Ranson

published by NeWest Press

2014

Non-Fiction | 152

CDN $: 19.95

In Bittersweet Sands, Rick Ranson takes readers on a journey into one of the most talked-about locations on the planet: the Northern Alberta oilsands. With his characteristic good humour and wit, Ranson peels back the layers on what it’s really like for the workers in Ft. McMurray.

Teaching Crowds

Learning and Social Media

by Jon Dron and Terry Anderson

published by AU Press

2014

Non-Fiction | 353

CDN $: 24.95

In Teaching Crowds, Dron and Anderson introduce a new model for understanding and exploiting the pedagogical potential of Web based technologies, one that rests on connections — on networks and collectives — rather than on separations.   

We Are Coming Home

Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence

by Edited by Gerald T. Conaty

published by AU Press

2014

Non-Fiction | 320

CDN $: 34.95

Aboriginal elders and museum officials recount the story of the highly complex process of repatriation that was begun by the Glenbow Museum in the early 1990s and that led to the implementation of the only repatriation legislation in Canada.

Coded Territories

Tracing Indigenous Pathways in New Media Art

by Steven Loft and Kerry Swanson

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Art & Culture | 216

CDN $: 34.95

Established artists, scholars, and curators cover thematic concepts and underlying approaches to new media from a distinctly Indigenous perspective and provide a historical and contemporary context for Indigenous new media arts practice in Canada.

small things left behind

by Ella Zeltserman

published by University of Alberta Press

2014

Poetry | 136

CDN $: 19.95

Lyric-narrative poetry of a Russian-Jewish refugee’s flight to Canada during the Cold War.

Rivers and Rails: Central Alberta’s Transcontinental Railways

published by Edmonton and District Historical Society

2014

History, Railroad | 68

CDN $: 19.95

Rivers and Rails describes the railway bridges in Edmonton which were built between 1897 and 1947 as well as the steel bridges built on the main lines of the two transcontinental railways which ran through Edmonton from the Alberta-Saskatchewan border to the east boundary of Jasper National Park. It is richly illustrated with period photographs, maps and line drawings.

This volume is the first in a series of numbered occasional papers to be published by the Edmonton and District Historical Society, a chapter of the Historical Society of Alberta. The book is distributed by Audreys Books in Edmonton (www.audreys.ca).

Film and the City

The Urban Imaginary in Canadian Cinema

by George Melnyk

published by AU Press

2014

Arts and Culture | 320

CDN $: 29.95

Examining fourteen Canadian films produced from 1989 to 2007, Film and the City argues that Canadian narrative film of the postmodern period has aided in articulating a new national identity.

Languages of Our Land/Langues de notre terre

Indigenous Poems and Stories from Quebec

by Edited by/Sous la direction de Susan Ouriou Translated by/Traduit par Christelle Morelli

published by Banff Centre Press

2014

| 176

CDN $: 18.95

Languages of Our Land/Langues de notre terre is a collection of poems and stories by twelve emerging and established Indigenous writers living in Quebec and writing in French.

Massacre Street

by Paul Zits

published by University of Alberta Press

2014

Poetry | 128

CDN $: 19.95

Merging poetry and historical records, Zits masterfully (re)creates a poetic view of the Frog Lake Massacre of 1885. His collage and cut-up techniques challenge the histories penned by the event’s recorders, reflecting upon the difficult complexities of past and present.

L’Alberta Autophage

Identités, mythes et discours du pétrole dans l’Ouest canadien

by Dominique Perron

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Current Issues | 450

CDN $: 39.95

Cet ouvrage présente une analyse discursive des récits identitaires albertains développés par rapport aux ressources pétrolières de l’Alberta, au fil de l’histoire moderne de la province.

Petropolitics

Petroleum Markets and Regulations, Alberta as an Illustrative History

by Alan J. MacFadyen and G. Campbell Watkins

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Economics, Non-Fiction | 512

An economic history of the petroleum history in Alberta as well as a detailed examination of the operation of the markets for Alberta oil and natural gas and the use of governmental regulations to balance and support economic development.

 

The Chinook Short Season Yard

Quick & Beautiful in the Calgary Region

by Lyndon Penner

published by Brush Education

2014

Cooking, Gardening | 256

CDN $: 24.95

With gardening smarts, style and wit, popular CBC gardening columnist Lyndon Penner covers everything both novice and expert gardeners in the Calgary region need to know, along with tips you won’t find anywhere else.

The Prairie Short Season Yard

Quick & Beautiful on the Canadian Prairies

by Lyndon Penner

published by Brush Education

2014

Cooking, Gardening | 256

CDN $: 24.95

Creating and maintaining the perfect yard on the prairies isn’t as hard as you think, but the short growing season doesn’t give you much time. Lyndon Penner has created the essential guide to a quick and beautiful yard on the Canadian prairies.

Petropolitics

by Alan J. MacFadyen and G. Campbell Watkins

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Business, Economics, History | 512

CDN $: 44.95

An economic history of the petroleum industry in Alberta as well as a detailed examination of the operation of the markets for Alberta oil and natural gas and the use of governmental regulations to balance and support economic development.

Long Night of the Tankers

Hitler's War against Caribbean Oil

by David J. Bercuson and Holger H. Herwig

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Business, Economics, History | 320

CDN $: 34.95

A fresh account of a lesser-known but critical component of the Atlantic naval theatre during World War II. Using war diaries, after-action reports, and first-hand accounts, the authors examine the story behind the German plan Operation Neuland.

The Letters of Vincent van Gogh

A Critical Study

by Patrick Grant

published by AU Press

2014

art | 239

CDN $: 27.95

As Grant demonstrates, quite apart from furnishing a highly revealing self-portrait of their author, the letters are compelling for their imaginative and expressive power, as well as for the perceptive commentary they offer on universal human themes. Through a subtle exploration of van Gogh’s contrastive style of thinking and his fascination with the notion of imperfection, Grant illuminates gradual shifts in van Gogh’s ideas on religion, ethics, and art. He also analyzes the metaphorical significance of a number of key images in the letters, which prove to yield unexpected psychological and conceptual connections, and probes the relationships that surface when the letters are viewed as a cohesive literary product. The result is a wealth of new insights into van Gogh’s inner landscape

One Hour in Paris

A True Story of Rape and Recovery

by Karyn L. Freedman

published by Freehand Books

2014

| 208

CDN $: 21.95

In this powerful memoir, philosopher Karyn L. Freedman travels back to a Paris night in 1990 when she was 22 and, in one violent hour, her life was changed forever by a brutal rape. A moving and essential look at how survivors cope and persevere.

Public Speaking and Other Plays

by Chris Craddock

published by NeWest Press

2014

art | 166

CDN $: 19.95

Award-winning actor/playwright Chris Craddock explodes the conventions of the theatrical monologue in this collection of three hilarious, poignant, feverishly inventive and (sometimes literally) electric solo stage pieces.

The Other Side of Gold Mountain

Glimpses of Early Chinese Pioneer Life on the Prairies from the Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection

by Brian L. Evans

published by University of Alberta Press

2014

History | 64

CDN $: 39.95

The Bruce Peel Special Collections Library’s exhibit catalogue, written by exhibit curator Brian Evans, chronicles the stories of Chinese pioneer life on the Canadian Prairies as they welcomed new opportunities, struggled with racism, and became integral parts of the communities in which they lived.

John C. Parkin, Archives, and Photography

Reflections on the Practice and Presentation of Modern Architecture

by Linda Fraser, Michael McMordie, and Geoffrey Simmins

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

art, Photograpgy | 170

CDN $: 49.95

John C. Parkin led the wave of post-war modernism in Canadian architecture creating a new imagery of architecture and the architect that was cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and self-assured. This richly illustrated book provides an understanding of why mid-century modernism is still so appealing today.

My Name Is Lola

by Lola Rozsa, as told to and written by Susie Sparks

published by University of Calgary Press

2014

Memoir | 336

CDN $: 39.95

This book contains the collected memories of Lola Rozsa as she and her husband, Ted, made their way from the southern plains of the US to the burgeoning oil fields of 1949 Alberta, and, for the next sixty years, made Calgary their home and helped build many of its cultural institutions.

A City Map in Verse and Visual

The Calgary Project

by Edited by Dymphny Dronyk and Kris Demeanor

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry, Visual | 115

A truly innovative project, A City Map in Verse and Visual, presents over 75 great Calgarian poets and visual artists.  This book is the legacy project of Calgary’s inaugural Poet Laureate.

Conrad Kain

Letters from a Wandering Mountain Guide, 1906-1933

by Edited by Zac Robinson

published by The University of Alberta Press

2014

Biography & Memoir | 468

CDN $: 34.95

Conrad Kain in a total amongst climbers in Canada.  This work orders Kain’s letters chronologically, with annotations and the definitive translation of the German sections of his letters.  Historians and mountain culture enthusiasts worldwide will appreciate Kane’s genius for description, his passion for nature, his opinions, and his musings about his life.

Regenerations

Canadian Women's Writing

by Edited by Marie Carriere and Patricia Demers

published by The University of Alberta Press

2014

essays, literature | 310

CDN $: 39.95

A compilation of 11 English and 5 French essays, this book was born out the inaugural conference of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory held at the Canadian Literature Centre, University of Alberta.

Climber’s Paradise

Makig Canada's Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

by Pearlann Reichwein

published by The University of Alberta Press

2014

History, Non-Fiction | 400

CDN $: 45.00

In Climber’s Paradise historian and mountain studies specialist PearlAnn Reichwein presents a compelling case for understanding wild places and human activity within them as parts of a whole.  This is a work of invaluable scholarship in the areas of environmental history, public policy, sports studies and recreation.

Palliser Suite

by Caroline Russell-King

published by Frontenac House

2014

Drama, Play | 127

CDN $: 15.95

Is a trilogy of one act plays set in the Palliser Hotel and written i homage to Neil Simon.  Playwright Caroline Russell-King received rave reviews and critical acclaim for her work.

kissing keeps us afloat

by laurie macfayden

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry | 116

CDN $: 15.95

Swinging and searing verses, meditative narratives, honky-tonk tunes and catalogues of favourite things (including what lovers bring — or leave behind) all merge to make this work a book for tongues and lips to sign. –George Elliott Clarke

Seva

by Sharanpal Ruprai

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry | 88

CDN $: 15.95

This collection of poems explores gendered Sikh identity construction within interstitial spaces of domestic/private/diasporic worlds.

Open Letter

Woman Against Violence Against Women

by Sheri D Wilson

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry | 104

CDN $: 15.95

A collection of poetry addressing the subject of violence against women.

designation youth

by David Bateman

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry | 106

CDN $: 15.95

designation youth considers six decades of living within highly sexualized sites.  Remembering the past becomes a mosaic of imagined desire and actual reconstructions of past experiences.

Folding the Wilderness Within

by Joan Shillington

published by Frontenac House Poetry

2014

Poetry | 74

CDN $: 15.95

Joan Shillington’s new collection mines “this threshold of ordinary” to show the gleaming moments in all our small lives.

riel street

by colette maitland

published by Frontenac House

2014

Fiction | 198

CDN $: 18.95

Told from various points of view, Riel Street is a realistic portrait of a military family: never sentimental, often comical and occasionally sad.

The Paradise Engine

by Rebecca Campbell

published by NeWest Press

2013

Fiction | 272

CDN $: 19.95

Set in British Columbia across two eras separated by a century, the Paradise Engine unfolds against a colourful backdrop of labour organizers, immaculately-attired cultists, ambitious socialites, teenage lovers, dank basement offices and innumerable coffee shops.

The Fast-Changing Arctic

Rethinking Arctic Security for a Warmer World

by Barry Scott Zellen (ed.)

published by University of Calgary Press

2013

Current Issues | 300

CDN $: 34.95

International scholars and military professionals come together to explore the strategic consequences of the thawing of the Arctic. Their analyses of efforts by governments and defence, security, and coast guard organizations to address these challenges make timely and urgent reading.

Wilderness and Waterpower

How Banff National Park Became a Hydro-Electric Storage Reservoir

by Christopher Armstrong and H. V. Nelles

published by University of Calgary Press

2013

History | 280

CDN $: 34.95

This engaging book explores how the need for electricity at the turn of the century affected and shaped Banff National Park. The narrative contains many unexpected twists and turns, some interesting characters, and some surprising outcomes.

Pathology Review

by Dr. Zu-hua Gao

published by Brush Education

2013

Medical | 304

CDN $: 189.95

Pathology Review is the newest and most comprehensive review guide for pathology licensing exams in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom.

Diversity, Culture and Counselling (2nd Ed.)

A Canadian Perspective

by M. Honoré France, María del Carmen Rodríguez and Geoffrey G. Hett

published by Brush Education

2012

Psychology | 426

CDN $: 44.95

Counsellors from a wide variety of backgrounds share their practical perspectives on subjects such as treating Muslim clients, the role of traditional healing methods in Aboriginal culture, and helping immigrant children cope with acculturation in the school system.

Canada’s Constitutional Revolution

by Barry L. Strayer

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

History | 360

CDN $: 27.99

From 1960 to 1982, Barry L. Strayer was instrumental in the design of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the patriation of Canada’s Constitution. Here, this key legal advisor gives an insightful contribution to Canadian history and political memoir.

Parks, Peace and Partnership

Global Initiatives in Transboundary Conservation

by Michael S.Quinn, Len Broberg, and Wayne Freimund (eds.)

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Enivronment | 560

CDN $: 39.95

This book explores the challenges and emerging solutions regarding development of transboundary protected areas and peace parks such as the established Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, the more recent Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and the proposed Siachen Peace Park.

Educating for Creativity

A Global Conversation

by Robert Kelly

published by Brush Education

2012

Education | 320

CDN $: 34.95

Take a journey to the most innovative schools on the planet to witness creative practice in action, with examples from early childhood to post-secondary levels.

Selves and Subjectivities

Reflections on Canadian Arts and Culture

by edited by Manijeh Mannani and Veronica Thompson

published by AU Press

2012

Cultural Studies | 276

CDN $: 29.95

By examining how writers and performers have conceptualized and negotiated issues of personal identity in their work, the essays collected in Selves and Subjectivities investigate emerging representations of self and other in contemporary Canadian arts and culture.

We Gambled Everything

The Life and Times of an Oilman

by Arne Nielsen

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Biography & Memoir | 368

CDN $: 23.99

Arne Nielsen’s expansive knowledge of geology and the oil industry made him one of the most influential and well-known figures of his time. “We gambled everything—our careers, our fortunes, the future of our nation. It was like living on a frontier.” —Arne Nielsen

The Reindeer Botanist

Alf Erling Porsild, 1901-1977

by Wendy Dathan

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Biography | 750

CDN $: 44.95

This long-awaited biography traces the challenging and adventurous career of a remarkable, little-known scientist who, in the end, earned universal respect for his prodigious publications and intimate knowledge of the people, plants and land around Canada’s Arctic Circle.

Herbert Has Lots for a Buck

How 12 Small Prairie Towns Reinvented Themselves For The 21st Century

by Elizabeth McLachlan

published by NeWest

2012

Business, Non-Fiction | 176

CDN $: 19.95

Canada’s small prairie towns face a difficult struggle in the turbulent new economy, many losing the fight to preserve jobs, services, and population. But these twelve have found ways to thrive, thanks to ingenuity, out-of-the-box thinking, and a little bit of luck.

Sefer

by Ewa Lipska, translated by Barbara Bogoczek and Tony Howard

published by AU Press

2012

Fiction | 156

CDN $: 14.95

Poetic, witty, and ever so faintly surreal, Sefer delicately explores the legacy of the Holocaust for the postwar generation, a generation for whom a devastating history has grown distant, both temporally and emotionally. One of Poland’s best-known poets, Ewa Lipska is today a major figure in European literature. In this translation of Sefer, Lipska’s first novel, the translators deftly capture the poet’s unmistakable voice—cool and precise, gently ironic, and deeply humane.

Synergy, Healing and Empowerment

Insights from Cultural Diversity

by Richard Katz and Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu

published by Brush Educational

2012

Psychology | 312

CDN $: 34.95

Drawing upon the diverse cultural experiences of Aboriginal groups in North America and around the world, this groundbreaking collection explores alternatives in the areas of counseling, education, and community health and development.

Doing What’s Best For Kids

A History of Fort McMurray Public School District No. 2833

by John Gilpin

published by Brush Education

2012

| 176

CDN $: 49.95

Doing What’s Best for Kids is a centennial history of the Fort McMurray Public School Board, one of the most important social institutions in the history of the city.

Tango Noir

Three Plays

by Rose Scollard

published by Frontenac

2012

Poetry | 96

CDN $: 19.95

Rose Scollard, co-founder of Maenad Theatre, has 31 produced dramas. Tango Noir, Bete Blanche and Preservation Blues are three favourites.

Blackbirds

by Garry Ryan

published by NeWest Press

2012

Adventure, Historical | 232

CDN $: $19.95

Garry Ryan, award-winning author of the Detective Lane series of mystery novels, debuts the first book in a new trilogy about young Sharon Lacey, a Canadian girl who becomes an RAF pilot during the Blitz.

The Shore Girl

by Fran Kimmel

published by NeWest Press

2012

Fiction | 224

CDN $: 19.95

Young Rebee Shore’s life is fragmented. Forever on the move, dragged around rural Alberta by her dysfunctional mother, she touches everyone she meets—family, friends, teachers, strangers—leaving indelible marks in her wake.

Swallow

by Theanna Bischoff

published by NeWest Press

2012

Fiction | 288

CDN $: 19.95

Upon the death of her troubled younger sister, teacher Darcy Nolan grapples with their frequently fraught relationship. A lyrical examination of those left behind after traumatic events, told with care and affection by the author of Cleavage.

Canadian Folk Art to 1950

by John A. Fleming & Michael J. Rowan

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Art & Architecture | 600

CDN $: 45

Cross-Media Ownership and Democratic Practice in Canada

Content-Sharing and the Impact of New Media

by Walter C. Soderlund et al

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Business, Economics | 160

CDN $: 27.99

This is the first in-depth analysis of major French- and English-Canadian news companies to show the impact of cross-media ownership on the diversity of new content. Surprisingly, the study lays to rest fears over content convergence, and examines why.

Natives and Settlers Now and Then

Historical Issues and Current Perspectives on Treaties and Land Claims in Canada

by Paul W. DePasquale

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Aboriginal Issues | 160

CDN $: 31.99

This collection reinterprets treaty making and land claims from Aboriginal perspectives. These five essays not only provide fresh insights to the interpretations of treaties and treaty-making processes, but also examine land claims still under negotiation.

Office Tower Tales (The)

by Alice Major

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Poetry | 264

CDN $: 19.99

In this ambitious long poem, Alice Major exemplifies the redemptive force of story. Through the light-hearted interplay of such literary touchstones as Chaucer, The Thousand and One Nights, and Greek myth, readers meet three women who share tales during coffee breaks.

Polio ’53

A Memorial for Russell Frederick Taylor

by Russell F. Taylor

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

History | 104

CDN $: 9.99

In the summer and fall of 1953 an epidemic of poliomyelitis struck Edmonton. Dr. Taylor recounts his experiences as director of the program that dealt with the worst medical emergency ever faced in northern Alberta.

Pursuing China

Memoir of a Beaver Liaison Officer

by Brian L. Evans

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Biography & Memoir | 392

CDN $: 27.99

Crucial events in late 20th-century Canada-China cultural relations are revealed in this historian-diplomat’s engrossing memoir. “A richly detailed and intimate account… [This] is the story of a man who, as a boy, got inspired and chose to live that inspiration.” Cha Magazine

Taking the Lead

Strategies and Solutions from Female Coaches

by Sheila Robertson

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Sports, Women's Studies | 312

CDN $: 27.99

In an extensive and frank exploration, leaders in women’s coaching discuss key issues for women in the coaching profession. They also identify the challenges to progress and highlight the essential changes that need to be made.

Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will

The Political Philosophy of Kai Nielsen

by David Rondel and Alex Sager (eds.)

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Culture | 520

CDN $: 34.95

Kai Nielsen has engaged much of the best work in Anglophone political philosophy, shedding light on many of the central debates and controversies of our time, yet, remaining a unique voice on the political left.

Martini With a Twist

5 Plays by Clem Martini

by Clem Martini

published by NeWest Press

2012

Comedy, Drama | 208

CDN $: 19.95

Absurdity reigns in multiple award-winning author and playwright Clem Martini’s newest collection of work, five utterly original one-act populated elephants, ghosts, whales, severed heads, and more.

Exploring the Math and Art Connection

Teaching and Learning Between the Lines

by Daniel Jarvis and Irene Naested

published by Brush Education

2012

Education | 304

CDN $: 44.95

Through innovative teaching strategies and more than 100 rich learning experiences, Jarvis and Naested give teachers a wealth of engaging tools to explore the math/art connection with students.

Administrative Discretion in Education

by Michael Manley-Casimir and Alesha D. Moffat

published by Brush Education

2012

Education | 264

CDN $: 34.95

What is involved in the exercise of discretion by educational administrators? This collection of papers furthers research into this important question. It presents seminal work from scholars and graduate students, as well as path-breaking analyses from other disciplines.

Winter in Fireland

A Patagonian Sailing Adventure

by Nicholas Coghlan

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Enivoment, Outdoors, Travel | 400

CDN $: 27.99

After tough assignments as a Canadian diplomat abroad, Nicholas Coghlan and his wife Jenny unwind by sailing Bosun Bird, a 27foot sailboat, from Cape Town, South Africa, across the South Atlantic and into the stormy winter waters around Tierra del Fuego, South America.

Social Democracy After the Cold War

by edited by Bryan Evans and Ingo Schmidt

published by AU Press

2012

Political Science | 340

CDN $: 29.95

The case studies of this volume point to a social democracy that has confirmed its rupture with the postwar order and its role as the primary political representative of working class interests. Once marked by redistributive and egalitarian policy perspectives, social democracy has, the book argues, assumed a new role—that of a modernizing force advancing the neoliberal cause.

Dramatic Licence

Translating Theatre from One Official Language to the Other in Canada

by Louise Ladouceur

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Non-Fiction | 300

CDN $: 34.95

Louise Ladouceur analyzes plays written and translated between 1961 and 2000, taking six works from each linguistic repertoire (English and French). In her award-winning book, Ladouceur compares the complexities of a translation process shaped by the power struggle between Canada’s two official languages.

Game Plan

A Social History of Sport in Alberta

by Karen L. Wall

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Sports | 344

CDN $: 31.99

Sasquatch at Home (The)

Traditional Protocols & Modern Storytelling

by Eden Robinson

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Aboriginal Issues |

CDN $: 64

Robinson shares an intimate look into the intricacies of family, culture, and place in her talk, “The Sasquatch at Home.” Robinson’s disarming honesty and wry irony shine through as she tells her delightful, poignant, and sometimes quirky tales.

Wells

by Jenna Butler

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Poetry | 80

CDN $: 15.99

Jenna Butler draws on her own experiences of her grandmother’s disappearance into senile dementia to reassemble a sensual world in longpoem form that positively crackles with imagery and rhythm. This is for readers who crave a deft style charged with honest emotion.

kiyâm

by Naomi McIlwraith

published by AU Press

2012

Poetry | 178

CDN $: 16.95

“[McIlwraith] detours around historical attitudes, attempting to write in both [English and Cree], in a pilgrimage of transcribing and transliteration, circumventing the many obstacles of self and society in order to do so.” — The Prairie Journal

The People Who Own Themselves

Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a Canadian Family, 1660-1900

by Heather Devine

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Aboriginal Issues | 358

CDN $: 39.95

Now available in softcover, this award-winning book reconstructs 250 years of a Métis family’s history across a substantial area of North America.

Any Bright Horse

by Lisa Pasold

published by Frontenac

2012

Poetry | 112

CDN $: 15.95

Finalist for a 2012 Governor-General’s Award. Inspired by The Book of Wonders, poet Lisa Pasold uses Marco Polo’s stories about Afghanistan, Russia, and China to speculate on the transformative effect of journeys.

‘Tis Pity

by David Bateman

published by Frontenac

2012

| 96

CDN $: 15.95

Part off-Broadway show without a cast, part bungalow for gender-dysphoric bachelorettes, ‘Tis Pity is furnished with poems that dart lyrically in and out of each other, bumping like herds of chameleons racing through a self-elegiac labyrinth toward an unspecified finish line.

Viewing Tom Thomson

A Minority Report

by Kevin Irie

published by Frontenac

2012

Poetry | 96

CDN $: 15.95

What is the place of an early 20th century landscape Canadian painter in the increasingly urban, multicultural world of 21st century Canada? To Japanese-Canadian poet Irie, Tom Thomson emerges as a source of inspiration, intrigue admiration, and ire.

Countering Displacements

The Creativity and Resilience of Indigenous and Refugee-ed Peoples

by Daniel Coleman

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Aboriginal Issues | 336

CDN $: 34.95

The essays in this collection explore the activities of two populations of displaced peoples that are seldom discussed together. Rather than focusing on victimhood, the authors focus on the creativity and agency of displaced peoples, thereby emphasizing capacity and resilience.

While the Sun is Above Us

by Melanie Schnell

published by Freehand

2012

Fiction | 240

CDN $: 21.95

In war-torn Sudan, two women’s lives are changed forever when chance brings them together in a brief but profound moment.

Seen Reading

by Melanie Schnell

published by Freehand

2012

Short Fiction | 240

CDN $: 21.95

A collection of microfictions—really short stories—that were inspired by people reading on public transit.

Social Work in Africa

Exploring Culturally Relevant Education and Practice in Ghana

by Linda Kreitzer

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Education, Research | 270

CDN $: 34.95

This book addresses the history of social work in Africa, particularly Ghana; the domination of western knowledge in the field; and the need for culturally and regionally informed teaching resources and programs relevant to the current African context.

Alfalfa to Ivy

Memoir of a Harvard Medical School Dean

by Joseph B. Martin

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Biography & Memoir | 392

CDN $: 31.99

Martin, an Albertan turned Dean of Harvard Medical School, gives his perspective on academic politics and health care in Canada and the U.S. The human story of Martin’s journey from humble origins to worldly esteem makes Alfalfa to Ivy a compelling read.

dear Hermes…

by Michelle Smith

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Poetry | 88

CDN $: 15.99

Joyous and adventurous, melancholy and nostalgic, Smith’s poems showcase a wide-ranging fascination with places, people, and story. Framed by imaginative travelogues addressed to Greek gods, dear Hermes… offers readers an escape and an entrance—out of time and into the poet’s luminous experience.

Grads Are Playing Tonight! (The)

The Story of the Edmonton Commercial Graduates Basketball Club

by M. Ann Hall

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Sports | 360

CDN $: 23.99

Between 1915 and 1940 the amazing Edmonton Grads dominated women’s basketball in Canada. Coached by J. Percy Page, they played over 400 official games, losing only 20. The story of the Edmonton Grads will enthrall fans of sport history and women in sport.

Heavy Burdens on Small Shoulders

The Labour of Pioneer Children on the Canadian Prairies

by Sandra Rollings-Magnusson

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

History | 192

CDN $: 27.99

A century ago on the Prairies, youngsters laboured alongside their parents, working the land, cleaning stovepipes, and chopping wood. Rollings-Magnusson uses dairies, letters, and photographs to describe the kinds of work performed and how each task fit into the family economy.

In Bed with the Word

Reading, Spirituality, and Cultural Politics

by Daniel Coleman

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Culture | 160

CDN $: 15.99

While reading is a deeply personal activity, paradoxically, it is also fundamentally social and outward-looking. In Bed with the Word sparks with every conceivable enticement for those who worry about living in a culture of distraction and who long to reconnect with something deeper.

Intersecting Sets

A Poet Looks at Science

by Alice Major

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Non-Fiction | 272

CDN $: 23.99

Poet Alice Major surveys the sciences of the past half-century — from physical to cognitive to evolutionary — to shed light on why and how human beings create poems. Part memoir, part wonder-journey, Intersecting Sets is a wide-ranging and insightful amalgam.

Man in Blue Pyjamas (The)

A Prison Memoir

by Jalal Barzanji

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Biography & Memoir | 288

CDN $: 19.99

From 1986 to 1988 poet and journalist Jalal Barzanji endured imprisonment and torture under Saddam Hussein’s regime because his writing openly explored themes of peace, democracy, and freedom. This literary memoir is the first translation of his work from Kurdish into English.

Measure of Paris (The)

by Stephen Scobie

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Non-Fiction | 356

CDN $: 23.99

Paris provides a measure of excellence in many areas of culture, and it is itself constantly being measured. This wide-ranging discussion of the city’s history in 20th century literature and thought will appeal to all those who love Paris

Narratives of Citizenship

Indigenous and Diasporic Peoples Unsettle the Nation-State

by Aloys N.M. Fleischmann et al

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Aboriginal Issues | 408

CDN $: 31.99

Examining various cultural products—music, cartoons, travel guides, ideographic treaties, film, and especially the literary arts—the contributors of these thirteen essays invite readers to conceptualize citizenship as a narrative construct, both in Canada and beyond.

This Wild Spirit

Women in the Rocky Mountains of Canada

by Colleen Skidmore

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

History, Women's Studies | 508

CDN $: 27.99

This Wild Spirit explores a sampling of women’s creative responses—in fiction and travel writing, photographs and paintings, embroidery and beadwork, letters and diaries, poetry and posters—to their experiences in the Rocky Mountains of Canada.

Too Bad

Sketches Toward a Self-Portrait

by Robert Kroetsch

published by University of Alberta Press

2012

Poetry | 112

CDN $: 19.99

A candid walk through the corridors of the poet’s remembering. “This book is not an autobiography. It is a gesture toward a self-portrait, which I take to be quite a different kettle of fish.” — Robert Kroetsch, from the Introduction

Follow the Money

Where is Alberta's Wealth Going?

by Kevin Taft, Mel McMillan, and Junaid Jahangir

published by Brush Education

2012

Current Affairs | 144

CDN $: 12.95

Alberta’s most insightful political commentator is back with another essential book. Kevin Taft follows the money to uncover why Alberta—one of the richest places on earth—still talks poor when it comes to public services.

Dance, Gladys, Dance

by Cassie Stocks

published by NeWest

2012

Fiction |

CDN $: 19.95

The uplifting story of a woman, 27-year old Frieda Zweig, whose uncanny connection with a kindred spirit named Gladys causes her to see her life in a new way – as anything but ordinary.

Western Taxidermy

by Barb Howard

published by NeWest

2012

Short Fiction |

CDN $: 19.95

Tender, satirical and occasionally absurd, Barb Howard’s Western Taxidermy is a perfect introduction to one of Western Canada’s most high-spirited literary voices. These sixteen stories effortlessly balance wry social commentary and prairie gothic.

Restless White Fields

by Barbara Langhorst

published by NeWest

2012

Poetry |

CDN $: 14.95

How do you rebuild a life? In this unsentimental collection of poems, Barbara Langhorst revisits a violent personal tragedy through startling imagery that rends even as it heals. Restless White Fields is unique, unexpected, and impossible to ignore.

Geographies of a Lover

by Sarah de Leeuw

published by NeWest

2012

Poetry |

CDN $: 14.95

Drawing inspiration from such diverse works as Pauline Réage’s The Story of O and Marian Engel’s Bear, poet Sarah de Leeuw uses the varied landscape of Canada—from the forests of North Vancouver through the Rocky Mountains, the prairies, and all the way to the Maritimes—to map the highs and lows of an explicit and raw sexual journey, from earliest infatuation to insatiable obsession and beyond.

Those Who Know

20th Anniversary Edition

by Dianne Meili

published by NeWest

2012

Biography, Memoir |

CDN $: 24.95

First published in 1991, Dianne Meili’s Those Who Know remains an essential portrait of Alberta’s native elders. In this 20th anniversary edition, Meili supplements her original text with new profiles and interviews that further the collective story of these men and women.

Revisioning Europe

The Films of John Berger and Alain Tanner

by Jerry White

published by University of Calgary Press

2012

Culture | 254

CDN $: 34.95

In the 1970s, English Marxist/humanist art critic, artist, and writer, John Berger, and Swiss film director, Alain Tanner, collaborated briefly on several film projects and produced a unique political cinema that was critical yet optimistic.

The Banff New Media Institute Dialogues

The Banff New Media Institute Dialogues

by Editors Sara Diamond and Sarah Cook

published by Banff Centre Press

2011

Culture | 1100

CDN $: 34.95

This publication is a compendium of some of the most visionary thinking about art and technology to have taken place in the last few decades

The Do-Gooders

A History of the Calgary Local Council of Women, 1895-1975

by Lillian MacLennan and Marjorie Barron Norris

published by Brush Education

2011

History | 336

CDN $: 23.95

The Do-Gooders, a rich source of information on the history of women in Calgary and Canada, focuses on the Calgary Local Council of Women.

Visual Orgasm

The Early Years of Canadian Graffiti

by Adam Melnyk

published by Frontenac

2011

Canadian Art | 108

CDN $: 35.00

Visual Orgasm showcases the history of Canadian graffiti and its American inspiration, featuring Canadian graffiti artists and images of the last thirty years. The foreword is by graffiti legend Zephyr, known for his graffiti in New York in the 1980s.

In this Place

Calgary 2006-2012

by George Webber and Aritha van Herk

published by Frontenac

2011

Photo Essay | 192

CDN $: 192 12 x 9 40.00

Webber frames images of the overlooked, the feral, the discarded, the unexpected and mysterious.Aritha van Herk’s strong gritty text complements and extends this unusual view of a changing Calgary.

Creative Arts in Research for Community and Cultural Change

by Cheryl McLean and Robert Kelly

published by Brush Education

2011

Education | 390

CDN $: 37.95

These illustrative articles describe the creative arts in research and practice within neighbourhoods, villages, and cities for community and cultural change.

The Spoken Word Workbook

Inspiration from poets who teach

by Edited by Sheri-D Wilson

published by Banff Centre Press

2011

Culture, Poetry | 220

CDN $: 20.00

More than a book, this is a play-space where the audience becomes the artist and artist becomes the audience.  The title features interactive exercises from seventeen professional spoken word artists.

Science She Loves Me

by Edited by Mary AnneMoser

published by Banff Centre Press

2011

Culture | 208

CDN $: 24.95

An engaging collection of texts and images that explores science as expressed by individuals, artists, scientists and teachers, from cafes and classrooms all the way to theatre and Hollywood.

The Art of University Teaching

by George Melnyk and Christine Mason Sutherland

published by Brush Education

2011

Education | 226

CDN $: 26.95

New university professors will find guidance and insight in these essays, which trace the many ways that professors have achieved excellence. This collection also contains reflections by university students.

Humanizing Security in the Arctic

by Michelle Daveluy, Francis Levésque, Jenanne Ferguson Editors

published by CCI Press

2011

Current Issues | viii + 316

CDN $: 50.00

Explores various forms of (in) security in the artic; institutional security, identity and culture, law and govenance, health and education, resources and economy, language and lifestyle, food security, and sovereignty.

A Thousand Years of Whaling

A Faroese Common Property Regime

by Seán Kerins

published by CCI Press

2011

Aboriginal Issues | iv + 194

CDN $: 40.00

Explores the development of Faroese Whaling, its ability to maintain itself and sustainably manage the resource on which it is based, and to respond to claims of animal rights and environmental organizations against the practice.

13 Ways to Kill Your Community

by Doug Griffiths and Kelly Clemmer

published by Frontenac

2010

Political Satire | 160

CDN $: 19.95

If you want to drive away people, eliminate jobs and completely destroy your community, here is a handy manual. Or, if you want to promote growth, prosperity and a healthy future you too can benefit. Just follow the advice in reverse

Tangles

A Story About Alzheimer's, My Mother, and Me

by Sarah Leavitt

published by Freehand

2010

Memoir, Non-Fiction | 120

CDN $: 23.95

In this powerful memoir the New York Times called “a poignant account,” Sarah Leavitt reveals how Alzheimer’s disease transformed her mother, Midge, and her family forever.

All Roads Lead to Manyberries

by Ron Wood

published by Frotnenac

2010

Political Satire | 240

CDN $: 21.95

With sharp wit, bold characterization and a keen eye for observing what is important – and funny – to Canadians, Ron Wood once again caricatures the political leadership and the small town foibles of this country.

Planning Co-Existence

Aboriginal Issues in Forest and Land-Use Planning

by Marc G. Sevenson, David C. Natcher Editors

published by CCI Press

2010

Culture | iv + 334

CDN $: 50.00

Explores the current state of land use planning in Canada, what may be required to meet the crown’s legal and fiduciary obligations in these processes, and issues of central importance to Aboriginal peoples in forestry and land use plans.

Roundtrip

The Inuit Crew of the Jean Revillon

by Michelle Daveluy

published by CCI Press

2010

Culture | xviii + 120

CDN $: 60.00

In 1925, an Inuit crew from the central Arctic manned the Jean Revillon from Baker Lake to Shelburne, NS for much needed repairr. Roundtrip relates their journey and documents the early relationships between Inuit and Nova Scotians.

Thing Feigned Or Imagined

A Self-Directed Course in the Craft of Fiction

by Fred Stenson

published by Banff Centre Press

2006

Culture | 234

CDN $: 18.95

Nationally and internationally acclaimed author Fred Stenson draws on a career of writing and mentoring to offer an engaging take on the craft of fiction writing.

The Acute-Care Nurse Practitioner

A Transformational Journey

by Judy Rashotte

published by Athabasca University Press

Current Issues | 244

CDN $: 24.95

Drawing on in-depth interviews with nurse practitioners working in acute-care settings across Canada, Dr. Rashotte describes how these professionals view their identities within this role and explores the practitioners’ struggles to engage in meaningful nursing practices.

Development Derailed

Calgary and the CPR, 1962-64

by Max Foran

published by Athabasca University Press

Business, Economics, History | 244

CDN $: 27.95

Development Derailed unravels a fascinating story of how politics undermined promise. Foran shows how an extensive 1962 proposal to develop the lands held by the Canadian Pacific Railway in downtown Calgary ultimately fell prey to a conflict between corporate rigidity and an unorganized civic administration.

Reel Time

Movie Exhibitors and Movie Audiences in Prairie Canada, 1896 to 1968

by Robert M. Seiler and Tamara P. Seiler

published by Athabasca University Press

Business, Economics, History | 381

CDN $: 44.95

Set against the backdrop of power struggles between national companies such as Odeon Theatres and Famous Players, Reel Time highlights the role of the “prairie palace” or movie theatre in shaping the leisure activities of the working and middle classes.

Man Proposes, God Disposes

Recollections of a French Pioneer

by Pierre Maturié, translated by Vivien Bosley

published by Athabasca University Press

Biography & Memoir | 260

CDN $: 29.95

In 1910, Pierre Maturié left France and travelled to northern Alberta in search of adventure, which he found in constructing railroad in the Rockies and transporting goods along the Athabasca River. Vivien Bosley’s translation preserves Maturié’s nostalgia for the area and gracefully depicts the French pioneer experience in Western Canada.

The Wages of Relief

Cities and the Unemployed in Prairie Canada, 1929-39

by Eric Strikwerda

published by Athabasca University Press

Business, Economics, History | 220

CDN $: 29.95

Touching on the experiences of those who relied on government programs to survive the Depression, Wages of Relief highlights the development of municipal relief administration. Focusing on Edmonton, Saskatoon, and Winnipeg, Strikwerda explores how gender dynamics informed city administrators’ responses to social and economic upheaval.

The Great Black North

Contemporary African Canadian Poetry

by Valerie Mason-John and Kevan Anthony Cameron (Editors)

published by Frontenac House

Poetry | 256

CDN $: 21.95

This first national collection of African Canadian poetry features 90 poets who document a range in style from page and stage. Includes internationally honoured Africadian George Elliott Clarke, Ian Keteku (crowned 2010 World Poetry Slam champion), Lillian Allen (founder of the dub poetry tradition in Canada), and Afua Cooper (brought to light the hanging of an enslaved African woman, Marie Joseph Angélique, for the alleged burning of Montreal in 1734).

Whirr & Click

by Micheline Maylor

published by Frontenac House

Poetry | 80

CDN $: 15.95

Micheline Maylor’s many-textured poems explore the liminal space where finite life and infinite time expand and contract into one another. In a duet of contrasts, memory, coming of age, danger, the erotic, and love twine into elegy and wonder. Time plays a featuring role and acts to freeze moments exactly as they arrive and simultaneously stretches experience into ungraspable infinity.

iii

by j. fisher

published by Frontenac House

Poetry | 96

CDN $: 15.95

iii is a summation of the dread, the absence and the anguish a man in his mid-thirties experiences as he contemplates his past and future. It has a lot to say about alcohol, drugs and sexual politics. iii is a lesson in what not to do, who to avoid, what choices to rethink. Then again, it might just be about girls.

33 Million Solitudes

by Ali Riley

published by Frontenac House

Poetry | 80

CDN $: 15.95

Ali Riley applies her unique and inventive poetics to our National identity. Breaking down and remixing our familiar icons – for example, The Hudson‘s Bay Company, Susannah Moodie’s Roughing it in the Bush – the poet finds that wanderlust, geography, solitude and a thirst for exploration still underlie the Canadian Spirit.

Goddess Gone Fishing for a Map of the Universe

by Sheri-D Wilson

published by Frontenac House

Poetry | 96

CDN $: 19.95

At once organic, spiritual and technical, the work uses QR codes to send readers outside the book to new vantage points. Goddess… is an upsurge, an uprising of feminine divine energy that Sheri-D says will quell the madness of our times.

Belinda’s Rings

by Corinna Chong

published by NeWest Press

Fiction | 264

CDN $: 19.95

With Belinda’s Rings, Corinna Chong introduces us to two lovable and thoroughly original female characters: persnickety, precocious Grace, and her impractical, impulsive mother Belinda—very different women who nevertheless persistently circle back into each other’s hearts.

Seldom Seen Road

by Jenna Butler

published by NeWest Press

Poetry | 80

CDN $: 14.95

Seldom Seen Road is a collection of sharply observed and understated poems about the land and its people, specifically those who have made it grow. Bare bones, full of wit, insight, and fine imagery, they make up a book carefully constructed around a striking vision of the Prairies and its slowly disappearing history.

Open Pit

by Marguerite Pigeon

published by NeWest Press

Mystery, Thriller | 288

CDN $: 19.95

On the eve of NorthOre’s opening of a new mining operation, a group of Canadian human-rights activists are taken hostage by a former revolutionary fighter who demands that the company stop production at the open-pit gold mine and allow his family’s remains to be exhumed. The mine’s Canadian owner, however, decides on a combined police and security force action to end the standoff.

The Devil’s Breath

The Story of the Hillcrest Mine Disaster of 1914

by Steve Hanon

published by NeWest Press

Business, Economics, History | 290

CDN $: 24.95

On a warm spring day in June of 1914, two hundred and thirty-five men went down into the depths of the Hillcrest mine, found in Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass. Only forty-six would make it out alive. The largest mining disaster in Canadian history, the fateful tale of the Hillcrest Mine is finally captured in startling detail by Steve Hanon.

Arriving: 1909-1919

Book one of the Understanding Ursula trilogy

by Corinne Jeffery

published by Roadie Books

Fiction | 398

CDN $: 24.95

On July 1, 1909, Gustav Werner applies for a homestead grant at the Dominion Lands Office, eager to become the most thriving German Lutheran homesteader in Saskatchewan. What he doesn’t realize is that life as he knows it is about to take a turn no one could have predicted.

Thriving: 1920-1939

Book two of the Understanding Ursula trilogy

by Corinne Jeffery

published by Roadie Books

Fiction | 355

CDN $: 24.95

With the return of prosperity to the Canadian prairies, Gustav Werner resumes his insatiable quest to acquire more prime farmland. Still, no one is more surprised than he when his hand is forced and his future reshaped by increasing drama and secrets.

The Healthy CEO

Taking the lead in your physical, relational and financial wellness

by Dr. Larry Ohlhauser, M.D.

published by Roadie Books

Non-Fiction | 329

CDN $: 34.95

Struggling to balance the important things in your life? Meet Frank and Katie, a CEO and an entrepreneur trying to make life, love and living work. Find hope and inspiration in their story and be empowered as you apply The Healthy CEO program to your life. Workbook included.

Disinherited Generations

Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and their Descendants

by Nellie Carlson & Kathleen Steinhauer, as told to Linda Goyette

published by University of Alberta Press

Business, Economics, History | 216

CDN $: 24.95

Oral autobiography of two remarkable Cree women, their life stories against a backdrop of government discrimination, decades of First Nations activism, and the resurgence of First Nations communities, that resulted in changing oppressive regulations, benefitting thousands of their descendants.

Healing Histories

Stories from Canada's Indian Hospitals

by Laurie Meijer Drees

published by University of Alberta Press

Business, Economics, History | 296

CDN $: 29.95

The first detailed collection of Aboriginal perspectives on the history of tuberculosis in Canada’s indigenous communities and on the federal government’s Indian Health Services, featuring oral accounts from patients, families, and workers who experienced Canada’s Indian Hospital system.

Travels and Tales of Miriam Green Ellis

Pioneer Journalist of the Canadian West

by Miriam Green Ellis

published by University of Alberta Press

Business, Economics, History | 296

CDN $: 34.95

Demers revives the memory of journalist Miriam Green Ellis, an all-but-forgotten feminist, suffragist, and agricultural reporter who documented the modernist sphere for over four decades and who refused to be confined to the “women’s pages.”

Recognition and Modes of Knowledge

Anagnorisis from Antiquity to Contemporary Theory

by Teresa G. Russo (Editor)

published by University of Alberta Press

Non-Fiction | 320

CDN $: 39.95

Anagnorisis, or recognition, has played a central role in the arts and humanities throughout history. It’s a universal mode of knowledge in literature and the arts; in sacred texts and scholastic writing; in philosophy, psychology, politics and social theory.

The Last Temptation of Bond

by Kimmy Beach

published by University of Alberta Press

Poetry | 120

CDN $: 19.95

In a penetrating, violent, sexy, and often hilarious apocalypse, a world-famous superspy meets his demise at the hands of an audacious, painstaking poet. Kimmy Beach fuses popular culture and narrative poetry to astonishing effect in this, her fifth book.

Dear Sir, I Intend to Burn Your Book

An Anatomy of a Book Burning

by Lawrence Hill

published by University of Alberta Press

Non-Fiction | 56

CDN $: 10.95

In 2011, Canadian writer Lawrence Hill received an email from a man in the Netherlands stating that he intended to burn The Book of Negroes, Hill’s internationally acclaimed novel. Soon, the threat was international news, affecting Hill’s publishers and readers.

We Gambled Everything

The Life and Times of an Oilman

by Arne Nielsen

published by University of Alberta Press

Business, Economics, History | 304

CDN $: 29.95

Canadian petroleum industry leader Arne Nielsen’s memoir illuminates a canny world inhabited by premiers, prime ministers, corporate chairmen, and chief executive officers, affording a comprehensive insider’s account of landmark discoveries that created his industry.

Wilderness and Waterpower

How Banff National Park Became a Hydroelectric Storage Reservoir

by Christopher Armstrong and H. V. Nelles

published by University of Calgary Press

Business, Economics, History | 286

CDN $: 34.95

This engaging book explores how the need for electricity at the turn of the century affected and shaped Banff National Park. The narrative contains many unexpected twists and turns, some interesting characters, and some surprising outcomes.

The Fast-Changing Arctic

Rethinking Arctic Security for a Warmer World

by Barry Scott Zellen (Editor)

published by University of Calgary Press

Current Issues | 410

CDN $: 34.95

International scholars and military professionals explore the strategic consequences of the thawing of the Arctic. Their analyses of efforts by governments and defence, security, and coast guard organizations to address these challenges make timely and urgent reading.

Shipwreck at Cape Flora

The Expeditions of Benjamin Leigh Smith, England’s Forgotten Arctic Explorer

by P. J. Capelotti

published by University of Calgary Press

Biography & Memoir | 300

CDN $: 39.95

Benjamin Leigh Smith discovered and named dozens of islands in the Arctic but published no account of his pioneering explorations. Capelotti details Leigh Smith’s five major Arctic expeditions and places them within the context of the great polar explorations in the nineteenth century.

Marion Nicoll

Silence and Alchemy

by Ann Davis, Elizabeth Herbert, Jennifer Salahub

published by University of Calgary Press

Art & Culture | 150

CDN $: 49.95

Marion Nicoll (1909–1985) is a widely acknowledged and important founder of Alberta art and certainly one of a dedicated few that brought abstraction into practice in the province.

From Realism to Abstraction

The Art of J. B. Taylor

by Adriana A. Davies

published by University of Calgary Press

Art & Culture | 150

CDN $: 49.95

Highly respected as an Alberta artist and teacher, J. B. (Jack) Taylor (1917-1970) is best known for his representational, semi-abstract, and abstract paintings of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. He captured the aura of the mountains in a unique style.