Read Alberta Books

Browse the latest titles by Alberta book publishers.

John Rae, Arctic Explorer

The Unfinished Autobiography

by John Rae, edited by William Barr

The University of Alberta Press

2019

Autobiography, Educational, History | 688

CDN: 60

John Rae is best known today as the first European to reveal the fate of the Franklin Expedition, yet the range of Rae’s accomplishments is much greater. Over five expeditions, Rae mapped some 1,550 miles (2,494 kilometres) of Arctic coastline; he is undoubtedly one of the Arctic’s greatest explorers, yet today his significance is all but lost. John Rae, Arctic Explorer is an annotated version of Rae’s unfinished autobiography. William Barr has extended Rae’s previously unpublished manuscript and completed his story based on Rae’s reports and correspondence—including reaction to his revelations about the Franklin Expedition. Barr’s meticulously researched, long overdue presentation of Rae’s life and legacy is an immensely valuable addition to the literature of Arctic exploration.

Polish War Veterans in Alberta

The Last Four Stories

by Aldona Jaworska

The University of Alberta Press

2019

Canadian History, Educational, European History | 328

CDN: 29.99

In the aftermath of World War II, more than 4,500 Polish veterans, displaced by war and the Soviet-oriented Polish government, were resettled in Canada as farm workers; 750 of these men were accepted by the province of Alberta. Polish War Veterans in Alberta examines how these former soldiers came to experience their new country and its sometimes-harsh postwar realities. This compelling work of social history is brought to life through the words and stories of four veterans, whose remembrances provide an intimate first-hand look at a moment of Canada’s past that is at risk of being forgotten.

Meaning Matters: Fact and Opinion

Finding Textual Evidence

by Terry Barber

Grass Roots Press

2019

Educational | 48

CDN: 12.95

The Meaning Matters series (set of 4 books) is designed for students who require instruction in a specific comprehension skill. Students will enjoy building their knowledge through reading the contemporary non-fiction passages in the workbook. The Fact and Opinion workbook contains 19 passages, each followed by a set of questions that provides practice in discerning between facts and opinions. The series’ content is derived from the following themes: history, environment, nature and science, people, health, social issues, law, sport, and labour. An answer key is included at the back of the workbook.

Meaning Matters: Main Idea

Finding Supporting Details

by Brenda Chapman

Grass Roots Press

2019

Educational | 48

CDN: 12.95

The Meaning Matters series (set of 4 books) is designed for students who require instruction in a specific comprehension skill. Students will enjoy building their knowledge through reading the contemporary non-fiction passages in the workbook. The Main Idea workbook contains 35 passages, each followed by a set of questions requiring students to identify main ideas and supporting details. The series’ content is derived from the following themes: history, environment, nature and science, people, health, social issues, law, sport, and labour. An answer key is included at the back of the workbook.

Meaning Matters: Inferences and Conclusions

Reading Between the Lines

by Gail Sjuberg

Grass Roots Press

2019

Educational | 48

CDN: 12.95

The Meaning Matters series (set of 4 books) is designed for students who require instruction in a specific comprehension skill. Students will enjoy building their knowledge through reading the contemporary non-fiction passages in the workbook. The Inferences and Conclusions workbook, which contains 20 passages, requires students to read closely and provide textual evidence to support inferences. The series’ content is derived from the following themes: history, environment, nature and science, people, health, social issues, law, sport, and labour. An answer key is included at the back of the workbook.

Meaning Matters: Vocabulary

Finding Meaning Beyond Words

by Linda Kita-Bradley

Grass Roots Press

2019

Educational | 48

CDN: 12.95

The Meaning Matters series (Set of 4 books) is designed for students who require instruction in a specific comprehension skill. The Vocabulary workbook provides instruction and activities in six areas: context clues, metaphors and similes, idioms, homophones, roots and affixes, and using the dictionary. Each unit begins by providing instruction on how to strengthen the target vocabulary skill or strategy. The final unit consists of three non-fiction passages, each followed by a set of questions that provides an overall review of the skills and strategies covered in the workbook. An answer key is included at the back of the workbook.

The Stories Were Not Told

Canada's First World War Internment Camps

by Sandra Semchuk

The University of Alberta Press

2018

Canadian History, Educational, History | 312

CDN: 34.99

From 1914 to 1920, thousands of men who had immigrated to Canada from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Germany, and the Ottoman Empire were unjustly imprisoned as “enemy aliens,” some with their families. Most were Ukrainians; almost all were civilians. The Stories Were Not Told presents this largely unrecognized event through photography, cultural theory, and personal testimony, including stories told at last by internees and their descendants. Semchuk describes how lives and society have been shaped by acts of legislated discrimination and how to move toward greater reconciliation, remembrance, and healing. This is necessary reading for anyone seeking to understand the cross-cultural and intergenerational consequences of Canada’s first national internment operations.

Sam Steele

A Biography

by Rod Macleod

The University of Alberta Press

2018

Biography, Canadian History, Educational, History | 432

CDN: 39.99

Sam Steele, “the man who tamed the Gold Rush,” had a high-profile public career, yet his private life has been closely protected. Sam Steele: A Biography follows Steele’s rise from farm boy in backwoods Ontario to the much-lauded Major General Sir Samuel Benfield Steele. Drawing on the vast Steele archive at the University of Alberta, this comprehensive biography vividly recounts some of the most significant events of the first fifty years of Canadian Confederation—including the founding of the North-West Mounted Police, the opening of the North through the Klondike, and Canada’s participation in the South African War—from the perspective of a policeman who became a military leader. Impeccably researched and accessibly written, Sam Steele is perfect for anyone interested in Canada’s early decades.

Canada’s Labour Market Training System

by Bob Barnetson

Athabasca University Press

2018

Education, Labour market, Labour Relations, Occupational Training |

CDN: 29.99

How does the current labour market training system function and whose interests does it serve? In this introductory textbook, Bob Barnetson wades into the debate between workers and employers, and governments and economists to investigate the ways in which labour power is produced and reproduced in Canadian society. After sifting through the facts and interpretations of social scientists and government policymakers, Barnetson interrogates the training system through analysis of the political and economic forces that constitute modern Canada. This book not only provides students of Canada’s division of labour with a general introduction to the main facets of labour-market training—including skills development, post-secondary and community education, and workplace training—but also encourages students to think critically about the relationship between training systems and the ideologies that support them.

Reconsidering Confederation

Canada's Founding Debates 1864-1999

by Daniel Heidt (editor)

University of Calgary Press

2018

Canadian History, Educational, Historical | 320

CDN: 34.99

July 1st 1867 is celebrated as Canada’s Confederation – the date that Canada became a country. But 1867 was only the beginning. As the country grew from a small dominion to a vast federation encompassing ten provinces, three territories, and hundreds of First Nations, its leaders repeatedly debated Canada’s purpose, and the benefits and drawbacks of the choice to be Canadian.

Reconsidering Confederation brings together Canada’s leading historians to explore how the provinces, territories, and Treaty areas became the political frameworks we know today. In partnership with The Confederation Debates, an ongoing crowdsourced, non-partisan, and non-profit initiative to digitize all of Canada’s founding colonial and federal records, this book breaks new ground by integrating the treaties between Indigenous peoples and the Crown into our understanding of Confederation.

Rigorously researched and eminently readable, this book traces the unique paths that each province and territory took on their journey to Confederation. It shows the roots of regional and cultural grievances, as vital and controversial in early debates as they are today. Reconsidering Confederation tells the sometimes rocky, complex, and ongoing story of how Canada has become Canada.

Hunting Alberta

by Duane S. Radford

Dragon Hill Publishing

2018

Guidebook, Hunting | 240

CDN: $21.95

Featuring content on hand loading and hunting gear, taxidermy, big game, upland game bird and waterfowl hunting in Alberta, Hunt Alberta (2017) is the only book of its kind in today’s market. There were 128,077 licensed hunters in Alberta in 2015 (the latest year for which sales are available) with increasing numbers during each of the preceding five years. It goes without saying that most hunters take the sport seriously and this guide will help them become better hunters. It’s a must-read for any keen hunter interested in the Alberta experience.

The True Face of Sir Isaac Brock

by Guy St-Denis

University of Calgary Press

2018

Academic, Biography, Canadian History, Historical | 338

CDN: 34.99

Major General Sir Isaac Brock is remembered as the Hero of Upper Canada for his defence of what is now Ontario during the War of 1812, and also for his noble death at the Battle of Queenston Heights. In the more than two centuries since then, Brock’s likeness has been lost in a confusing array of portraits—most of which are misidentified or conceptual.

The 1824 monument constructed to honour Brock’s sacrifice was destroyed in 1840 by Benjamin Lett, a disgruntled disciple of William Lyon Mackenzie and critic of the Upper Canadian elite. The replacement and subsequent commemorations emphasized a patriotic desire to visualize the hero’s appearance. But despite uncovering an authentic portrait painted only a few years before Brock’s death, a series of false faces were promoted to serve competing claims and agendas. St-Denis situates Brock’s portraits within an emerging English Canadian imperial nationalism that sought a heroic past which reflected their own aspirations and ambitions.

A work of detailed scholarship and a fascinating detective story, The True Face of Sir Isaac Brock details the sometimes petty world of self-proclaimed guardians of the past, the complex process of identification and misidentification that often occurs even at esteemed Canadian institutions, and St-Denis’ own meticulous work as he separates fact from fiction to finally reveal Brock’s true face.

My Heroes Have Always Been Indians

A Century of Great Indigenous Albertans

by Cora J. Voyageur

Brush Education

2018

Alberta, Canadian History, Educational, Indigenous | 226

CDN: 24.95

In a series of inspirational profiles, Cora Voyageur celebrates 100 remarkable Indigenous Albertans whose achievements have enriched their communities, the province, and the world.

As a child, Cora rarely saw Indigenous individuals represented in her history textbooks or in pop culture. Willie Nelson sang “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys,” but Cora wondered, where were the heroes who looked like her? She chose the title of her book in response, to help reflect her reality.

In fact, you don’t have to look very hard to find Indigenous Albertans excelling in every field, from the arts to business and everything in between. Cora wrote this book to ensure these heroes receive their proper due.

Some of the individuals in this collection need no introduction, while others are less well known. From past and present and from all walks of life, these 100 Indigenous heroes share talent, passion, and legacies that made a lasting impact.

Read about:

  • Douglas Cardinal, the architect whose iconic, flowing designs grace cities across Alberta, across Canada, and in Washington, DC,
  • Nellie Carlson, a dedicated activist whose work advanced the cause of Indigenous women and the education of Indigenous children,
  • Alex Janvier, whose pioneering work has firmly established him as one of Canada’s greatest artists,
  • Moostoos, “The Buffalo,” the spokesperson for the Cree in Treaty 8 talks who fought tirelessly to defend his People’s rights,
  • And many more.

What We Are When We Are

Kaj smo, ko smo

by Cvetka Lipuš, trans. by Tom Priestly

Athabasca University Press

2018

Poetry, Translation | 92

CDN: 19.99

Working within a postmodern style, this rhythmic and melodious bilingual collection of poems originally written in Slovenian by Cvetka Lipuš and translated here by Tom Priestly, blends the real with the surreal, dull urban lives with dreams. Lipuš, known for the lexical beauty of her work, dwells on topics of time and space which she handles in an almost revolving, irreverent manner. Priestly captures the maze-like characteristic of her verse and carefully reconstructs the sonoric beauty of the work in its original language.

Sharing Breath

Embodied Learning and Decolonization

by ed. Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong

Athabasca University Press

2018

Critical Pedagogy, Cultural Dialectics, Educational | 398

CDN: 41.95

Treating bodies as more than discursive in social research can feel out of place in academia. As a result, embodiment studies remain on the outside of academic knowledge construction and critical scholarship. However, embodiment scholars suggest that investigations into the profound division created by privileging the mind-intellect over the body-spirit are integral to the project of decolonization.

The field of embodiment theorizes bodies as knowledgeable in ways that include but are not solely cognitive. The contributors to this collection suggest developing embodied ways of teaching, learning, and knowing through embodied experiences such as yoga, mindfulness, illness, and trauma. Although the contributors challenge Western educational frameworks from within and beyond academic settings, they also acknowledge and draw attention to the incommensurability between decolonization and aspects of social justice projects in education. By addressing this tension ethically and deliberately, the contributors engage thoughtfully with decolonization and make a substantial, and sometimes unsettling, contribution to critical studies in education.

My Brother Chuck

by Andrew Evans

Stonehouse Publishing

2018

Fiction | 340

CDN: 19.95

My Brother Chuck is a touching and insightful look at growing up male in the 50s and 60s. Growing up in a peaceful suburban family, two dissimilar brothers attempt to apply the life-lessons from their parents with varying degrees of success. Little brother Chuck is a born salesman, while his older brother is a reticent engineer, who struggles to understand his more outgoing wife. Then a crisis, and an extreme step, leaving behind the haunting question, ‘Is that what Dad meant?’

Lady Franklin of Russell Square

by Erika Behrisch Elce

Stonehouse Publishing

2018

Historical Fiction, literature | 220

CDN: 19.95

My dearest love,
Where are you now?
Spring, 1847, and Lady Franklin is back in London expecting to greet her hero husband, polar explorer Sir John Franklin, upon his triumphant return from the Northwest Passage. As weeks turn to months, she develops an unconventional friendship with Russell Square’s gardener even as she reluctantly grows into her public role as Franklin’s steadfast wife, the “Penelope of England.” In this novel that imagines a rich interior life of one of Victorian England’s most intriguing women, the boundaries of friendship, propriety, and love are sure to collide.

The Poor Clare

by Elizabeth Gaskell

Stonehouse Publishing

2018

Classics, Fiction, Horror | 65

CDN: 16.95

Set in Victorian England, Gaskell’s gothic masterpiece weaves the tale of a lonely old woman whose curse upon the murderer of her cherished dog unleashes unintended consequences. The impulse of revenge is turned to contrition after the discovery of an unexpected connection between her and the accursed. Through Ireland to Yorkshire and finally London, a young lawyer discovers a beautiful young woman mysteriously followed by her own demonic doppelganger, and sets out to learn if the curse can be broken.

The High Line Scavenger Hunt

by Lucas Crawford

University of Calgary Press

2018

Poetry | 144

CDN: 18.99

Imagine: a public park that floats above the city, slicing the urban grey with its narrow green body. It winds its way through Manhattan, from the Meatpacking District to Chelsea to the Rail Yards. It is the beneficiary of millionaires, politicians, and citizens, who rescued it from demolition. Every tour book points here. Cities around the world clamor to reclaim their own abandoned train tracks as parks, inspired by this success. This is High Line Park.

Imagine: the Meatpacking District, 1989. Affordable apartments in Chelsea. Queer and racialized youth vogue, using piers as their runways. A transsexual community bands together. The fight for AIDS awareness takes hold. After sunsink, punks and urban adventurers hoist themselves onto the abandoned train tracks, where seeds dropped from loose locomotive doors have bloomed into an elsewhere-landscape, commemorating dead commerce. This was the High Line.

The High Line Scavenger Hunt is a poetic search for the ruins and relics of this fraught space that straddles violent gentrification and erased histories. This is a scavenger hunt, but the list of items is written in invisible ink. Lucas Crawford leans in to the tensions between the revitalized High Line Park and the queer histories of the High Line neighborhood, braiding transgender history, autobiographical reflection, and architectural speculation into a commentary on the histories now lost to gentrification.

American Labour’s Cold War Abroad

From Deep Freeze to Détente, 1945-1970

by Anthony Carew

Athabasca University Press

2018

History, Political Science | 504

CDN: 49.99

During the Cold War, American labour organizations were at the centre of the battle for the hearts and minds of working people. At a time when trade unions were a substantial force in both American and European politics, the fiercely anti-communist American Federation of Labor–Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL–CIO) set a strong example for labour organizations overseas. The AFL–CIO cooperated closely with the US government on foreign policy and enjoyed an intimate, if sometimes strained, relationship with the CIA. The activities of its international staff, and especially the often secretive work of Jay Lovestone and Irving Brown—whose biographies read like characters plucked from a Le Carré novel—exerted a major influence on relationships in Europe and beyond.

Having mastered the enormous volume of correspondence and other records generated by staffers Lovestone and Brown, Carew presents a lively and clear account of what has largely been an unknown dimension of the Cold War. In impressive detail, Carew maps the international programs of the AFL–CIO during the Cold War and its relations with labour organizations abroad, in addition to providing a summary of the labour situation of a dozen or more countries including Finland, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Greece, and India. American Labour’s Cold War Abroad reveals how the Cold War compelled trade unionists to reflect on the role of unions in a free society. Yet there was to be no meeting of minds on this, and at the end of the 1960s the AFL–CIO broke with the mainstream of the international labour movement to pursue its own crusade against communism.